All Things Geography
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All Things Geography
Teaching and learning material for geography education or for curious minds
Curated by Tom Rees
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Sustainable Development in the Olympics: Report from Jones Lang LaSalle - MarketWatch (press release)

Sustainable Development in the Olympics: Report from Jones Lang LaSalle - MarketWatch (press release) | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Sustainable Development in the Olympics:

The 2012 Summer Olympics in London this July will be the greenest Games in history, expanding on the legacy of sustainable development that has expanded in past Olympics. A new report from Jones Lang LaSalle traces the path of sustainable development as Olympic planners and host cities over the past 20 years have increasingly recognized the synergy between economic and environmental sustainability.
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“Don’t complain about things that you can’t change”

“Don’t complain about things that you can’t change” | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
THE greatest wave of voluntary migration in human history transformed China’s cities, and the global economy, in a single generation.

 

After a generation of intense rural to urban migration in China, barriers to social mobility still remain intact. 


Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton
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Hua YAN's curator insight, February 6, 2014 5:15 PM

阶层固化到了如此地步,和谐社会,从何谈起?!

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 2014 11:10 AM

China's system of classification in this article is what really struck out at me. People are classified as "Rural" or "Non-Rural" and it runs through the family line. So even if a child is born in a city to rural parents, he or she is counted as rural and therefore is treated a bit like a second class citizen.

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Sustainability hinges on local policies, not global goals - SciDev.Net

Sustainability hinges on local policies, not global goals - SciDev.Net | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Sustainable development targets will work only if they engage with the realities of national politics, says policy expert Matthew Lockwood.

In the run-up to this month's UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in Brazil, much has been written about how to define sustainable development; the balance between environmental sustainability and human development; the kinds of goals and targets that might be adopted; and how these might then relate to goals that follow on from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
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Rwanda: The Land of Gender Equality? | Think Africa Press

Rwanda: The Land of Gender Equality? | Think Africa Press | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
With a female majority in parliament, women at all levels of government and equal literacy rates for boys and girls, Rwanda looks to be a model of equality.
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Declining Birthrates Key to Europe's Decline | Newgeography.com

Declining Birthrates Key to Europe's Decline | Newgeography.com | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
The labor demonstrators, now an almost-daily occurrence in Madrid and other economically-devastated southern European cities lambast austerity and budget cuts as the primary cause for their current national crisis. But longer-term, the biggest threat to the European Union has less to do with government policy than what is–or is not–happening in the bedroom.

In particular, southern Europe’s economic disaster is both reflected — and is largely caused by — a demographic decline that, if not soon reversed, all but guarantees the continent’s continued slide. For decades, the wealthier countries of the northern countries — notably Germany — have offset very low fertility rates and declining domestic demand by attracting migrants from other countries, notably from eastern and southern Europe, and building highly productive export oriented economies.
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Going nuclear-free: Germany smashes solar power world record (PHOTOS) — RT

Going nuclear-free: Germany smashes solar power world record (PHOTOS) — RT | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Germany’s solar power plants produced a record 22 gigawatts of energy on Friday, equivalent to the output of 20 nuclear plants. The country is already a world-leader in solar power and hopes to be free of nuclear energy by 2022.
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Crystal Composition Could Predict Volcanic Eruptions - Science News - redOrbit

Crystal Composition Could Predict Volcanic Eruptions - Science News - redOrbit | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
By studying crystals formed in volcanic rock, experts may be able to predict an impending eruption up to a year in advance, researchers from the University of Bristol have discovered.
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How green is shale gas?

How green is shale gas? | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

The rise of 'fracking' means the IEA is hailing a 'golden age for gas'. But what impact does shale gas have on the environment? Leo Hickman, with your help, investigates.

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Wind turbine creates water from thin air - CNN.com

Wind turbine creates water from thin air - CNN.com | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Wind turbines already produce electricity in an environmentally friendly way but a new eco-purpose has been discovered for the towering structures.
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Pakistan energy shortfall fuels row over coal power plants

Pakistan energy shortfall fuels row over coal power plants | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Power cuts are routine in Pakistan, which cannot meet its energy demand, but environmentalists insist 'dirty' coal is not an option...

 

According to an official source, gas accounts for 45% of Pakistan's energy mix while 35% comes from imported oil and the rest comes from hydroelectricity at 12%, coal at 6% and nuclear at 2%. The Pakistan Energy Yearbook 2010 predicts that by 2030 the country's energy generation will increase to 162,590 megawatts and consist of 45% natural gas, 19% coal, 18.5% oil, 2.5% renewable, 10.8% hydropower and 4.2% nuclear.

 

Pakistan's current demand is 15,000 megawatts but production is just 9,000 megawatts, resulting in a shortfall of 6,000 megawatts. Little wonder then that leading economist Kaiser Bengali says: "For Pakistan, there is no alternative but [to turn to] coal. We cannot afford to be romantic."

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Some Like it Cold: effects of global warming

Some Like it Cold: effects of global warming | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

Polar regions have suffered dramatically the consequences of global warming: ice melting, rising temperatures and the consequent transformation of flora and fauna are just few of the deep changes that marked these regions in an irreversible manner and will influence future human life and activities.
This visualization aims to highlight the main factors that have brought these changes. The top graph shows the relationships data between temperature, carbon dioxide concentration & sea-ice in the last century- we have then developed two different future trends.
The polar regions system map, designed as the structure of an ice crystal, shows the complex tangle of relationships and flows, highlighting the importance of each element for the whole system's balance.
Ice is in the centre of the visualization, as it’s the core of the entire polar environment and influences all other characters, while on the top are greenhouse gases- the primary responsible of increasing temperature and of climatic mutation in Arctic and Antarctic.
The analysis shows crearly how polar regions heavily suffer a phenomenon to which they contribute minimally, but provoking chilling consequences which involve the whole world...


Via Lauren Moss
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Mapping Global Water Stress

Mapping Global Water Stress | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

Water scarcity is likely to be one of the great problems facing the planet this century. Various risk factors contribute to the scarcity of clean water. A new mapping tool from the World Resources Institute visualizes how those risk factors can combine to create large problems, or how conditions can be improved to reduce the potential for water shortages between now and 2095.

The Water Risk Atlas shows how variable environmental conditions, human activities and regulatory environments affect the stability of water sources all over the world. One-year and three-year socioeconomic droughts can be displayed, as can baseline water stress, seasonal variability, inter-annual variability, and flood frequency. The tool also shows projected water stress levels for the years 2025, 2050 and 2095, under three different climate change scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.


Via Lauren Moss
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Iran discovers 26 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in Persian Gulf  |  Peak Oil News and Message Boards

Iran discovers 26 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in Persian Gulf  |  Peak Oil News and Message Boards | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
The latest exploration operations at the Kish gas field, which is located in the Persian Gulf, show that it contains at least 66 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, which is a rise of 26 trillion cubic feet over previous estimates, according to an official of the National Iranian Oil Company
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The wealth of nations

The wealth of nations | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
An alternative approach to measuring national well-being GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT, better know by its initials, GDP, has been economists' chosen measure of a nation's well-being for over 70 years.

Via Mr. David Burton, Josh Kettell
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Rising populations may be driving Earth towards an irreversible 'tipping point ... - Daily Mail

Rising populations may be driving Earth towards an irreversible 'tipping point ... - Daily Mail | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
An apocalyptic, malthusian view on how rising populations may be driving Earth towards an irreversible 'tipping point ...Daily MailBy Rob Waugh Rising populations are driving Earth towards a 'tipping point' where species we depend on die out, says a committee of 22 scientists - hitting...
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World's urban waste mountain a 'silent problem that is growing daily'

World's urban waste mountain a 'silent problem that is growing daily' | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
World Bank report urges city authorities to reduce, reuse, recycle or recover energy from growing mountain of urban waste...
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Peoples under threat around the world: map

Peoples under threat around the world: map | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
How safe are indigenous peoples around the world? This map shows country rankings according to the latest Peoples Under Threat index from Minority Rights Group International. South Sudan is the highest riser, although it has only just come into existence. A history of cattle raiding between the Lou Nuer and the Murle, as well as other groups, has developed into inter-communal violence affecting 120,000 people, and tens of thousands of refugees have also fled across the border in recent months.
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Why is there more oilseed rape being grown?

Why is there more oilseed rape being grown? | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
Farmers in the UK are growing more vivid yellow oilseed rape than ever before. Why?

 

Travelling up and down the railways and motorways of the UK in recent weeks, it seems like the surrounding fields are yellower than ever.

 

The bright dandelion-yellow flowers of oilseed rape have been a familiar sight across farmland in spring across the country for years.

 

But now experts say farmers are growing more than ever before.

 

The boom is being driven by rocketing prices as it becomes more desirable for food, and other producers in Europe suffer the effects of bad weather.

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How to feed a planet, continued | The Economist

How to feed a planet, continued | The Economist | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

Without the revolution in Brazil’s cerrado and the transformation of inefficient collective and state farms after the fall of communism, it is hard to imagine how the cities of Asia and Africa would have been fed. That raises disturbing questions about the future. The dramatic increase in imports in Asia and the Middle East and Africa seems certain to continue.


Via CGIAR Climate
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Exclusive Interview: Why Tar Sands Oil Is More Polluting and Why It Matters | InsideClimate News

Exclusive Interview: Why Tar Sands Oil Is More Polluting and Why It Matters | InsideClimate News | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

Adam Brandt, global expert on the carbon footprint of fuels, explains why oil sands' 20% greater greenhouse gas emissions are significant.


Via Cathryn Wellner, Tony Burton
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Earth’s Core: The Enigma 1,800 Miles Below Us

Earth’s Core: The Enigma 1,800 Miles Below Us | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
New research suggests the existing models of Earth’s core may not explain its complexities.

Geologists have long known that Earth’s core, some 1,800 miles beneath our feet, is a dense, chemically doped ball of iron roughly the size of Mars and every bit as alien. It’s a place where pressures bear down with the weight of 3.5 million atmospheres, like 3.5 million skies falling at once on your head, and where temperatures reach 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit — as hot as the surface of the Sun. It’s a place where the term “ironclad agreement” has no meaning, since iron can’t even agree with itself on what form to take. It’s a fluid, it’s a solid, it’s twisting and spiraling like liquid confetti.

Researchers have also known that Earth’s inner Martian makes its outer portions look and feel like home. The core’s heat helps animate the giant jigsaw puzzle of tectonic plates floating far above it, to build up mountains and gouge out seabeds. At the same time, the jostling of core iron generates Earth’ magnetic field, which blocks dangerous cosmic radiation, guides terrestrial wanderers and brightens northern skies with scarves of auroral lights.

Now it turns out that existing models of the core, for all their drama, may not be dramatic enough. Reporting recently in the journal Nature, Dario Alfè of University College London and his colleagues presented evidence that iron in the outer layers of the core is frittering away heat through the wasteful process called conduction at two to three times the rate of previous estimates.
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Women should be focus of energy expansion plans, says UN

Women should be focus of energy expansion plans, says UN | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

Access to energy alone is not enough to combat poverty, says UN report, it needs to be allied with microfinance and education programmes...

 

Women should be the focus of efforts to bring access to modern energy to those who lack it, a new United Nations report has found, as bringing energy to women and girls helps lift communities out of poverty and improves health.

 

But the report also warned that providing energy alone was not enough to combat poverty, and programmes to provide energy access work best when they are accompanied by help for people to access other key services such as microfinancing and education.

 

Providing energy to the poor has long been seen as key to addressing poverty levels, and over the last 20 years there have been scores of programmes that attempt to bring energy services for lighting and cooking to deprived communities, particularly in rural areas. But too many of these have focused only on supplying access to villages, towns and homes – often a question of just putting in the cabling or generating equipment.

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Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia

With desertification, drought and a booming mining industry, Mongolians are leaving the traditional life of herding. Herdsman Bat-Erdene Badam says he will be the last in his family to tend livestock. 

 

How is globalization changing the traditional pastoral society of Mongolia?  As China's industrial production was ballooned, their need for mineral resources has need towards more mining jobs in Mongolia.  For more information and pictures on this topic, see: http://www.npr.org/series/152995168/mongolia-booms


Via Seth Dixon
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Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future?

Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future? | All Things Geography | Scoop.it

The debate on aquifers continues as new technologies designed by oil companies are able to tap historic water reserves deep in the Earth's crust.  The geopolitical significance of water rises as population growth within dry climates continue to rise.   As more countries (and people) compete for limited resources, outbreaks of armed conflict becomes more likely.   The more pertinent question might not be 'if' but 'when.'


Via Kyle M Norton, Seth Dixon, Lauren Moss
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Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2012 11:55 PM
My colleagues at the National Council for Geographic Education LOVE this link...many people have seen your work and it's impacted teachers all over the country.
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Oxygen Depletion and Acidification Accelerate Coral Death

Oxygen Depletion and Acidification Accelerate Coral Death | All Things Geography | Scoop.it
To better understand how to protect coral reefs, a team of microbiologists are investigating how environmental changes, such as oxygen depletion and ocean acidification, create a chain reaction that leads to coral death.
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