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Rescooped by Shirley Williams (XeeMe.com/ShirleyWilliams) from Internet Marketing Strategy 2.0
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Engagement Publishing is the New Content Marketing - Here's Why - John Battelle

Engagement Publishing is the New Content Marketing - Here's Why - John Battelle | All Things Curation | Scoop.it

I selected this piece today because it is timely and relevant, social media is part of the equation but the focus should be on social business, which is the bigger picture. It's important to package your content and repurpose it to fit the social network(s) where your audience resides. This interview talks about   

 

In this interview with McKinsey and Compay, John Battelle, founder & chairman of Federated Media Publishing says.....

 

**Marketers need to shift their mindset from being a publisher to engaging an audience.

 

To paraphrase:

 

Marketers are starting to see an ecosystem of paid, owned and earned media that they're very interested in feeding through social interactions and content marketing.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

Marketers have always created content, print and radio ads, 30-second spots, display banners

 

****But they never have really seen these elements as an integrated corpus of content living in a digitally driven ecosystem

 

**Marketers need to become engagement publishers

 

**"Increasingly, [marketers] are realizing that this social media space involves an ongoing conversation. Assets never really go away."

 

**Building conversation “inventory” at scale

 

I agree that all brands probably should be on Facebook, but what you really need is an integrated strategy that has – at its root – the brand's own domain, independent from any platform other than the Internet itself.

 

Measuring the success of conversational engagement

 

These things are very hard to directly measure from a simple click. And often, as we know, the people who click are not the people you want as customers anyway.

 

**So you need a bridge to that kind of insight that gives a media buyer the justification to say that this new technology is worth the investment.

 

**Marketers have been very interested in understanding how their content is amplified in the past few years

 

**Now there is technology that allows us to automatically collect and present this data (More in detail in interview)

 

**The best companies create communities of interest that are independent:

 

**they are rooted in the independent Web, with expressions on Facebook, or as an iPhone or Android app – those all become instances of their brand.

 

** Companies should create a circulatory system through which they can promote different aspects of their messaging and interactions with their community.

 

**If you're going to be a brand with a publishing approach to marketing, you must have an independent taproot that isn’t controlled by anyone but you. 

 

Put out your branches and feelers everywhere. Integrate that experience and let your content and messaging flow through it.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full interview here: [http://bit.ly/x7mHwm]


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Rescooped by Shirley Williams (XeeMe.com/ShirleyWilliams) from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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The Future of Social Media: 38 Experts Share Their Predictions For 2012

The Future of Social Media: 38 Experts Share Their Predictions For 2012 | All Things Curation | Scoop.it

Brian Rice wrote this piece for Business 2 Community

 

 

"What is in store for 2012? With only two months remaining until the end of the year, there is no better time than now to pause and take a look towards the future."

 

 

 

Here are a few things that caught my attention:

 

Elias Roman, CEO and co-founder of Songza

 

First, the easy prediction: more and more of the information we consume on a daily basis (from news to product reviews to entertainment) will come via the social media channels we have opted into and, more specifically, from the information filters we have chosen to subscribe to in those channels.

 

****In the short term, more information will come from more sources delivered through fewer channels.

 

Tony Ellison CEO from Shoplet.com

 

****Social media can insert the missing human touch and allow mankind to tap into the full potential of the internet. Because of this, it is going to transform eCommerce as we know it.

 

Loren McDonald, VP of Industry Relations at Silverpop

 

The convergence of mobile, social, local and email, or “mocial,” is forcing marketers to change the way they interact with customers and prospects to ensure that they are where their customers and prospects are, all the time. In 2012 and beyond, savvy marketers will need to cross promote between all channels.

 

Read full article [http://bit.ly/um8j7u]

 


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Karen du Toit's comment, November 3, 2011 5:07 AM
Thanks for this! I have rescooped it!
janlgordon's comment, November 3, 2011 8:21 AM
Hi Karen, Thanks for rescooping this, nice to meet you here:-)
DiTesco's comment, November 3, 2011 12:33 PM
Thumbs up! Rescooped
Rescooped by Shirley Williams (XeeMe.com/ShirleyWilliams) from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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When Everyone is Tweeting, Who is Paying Attention?

When Everyone is Tweeting, Who is Paying Attention? | All Things Curation | Scoop.it

Food for thought from Toddi Gutner for Business2Community:

 

I found this piece particularly interesting and wanted to call your attention to it. It's one of those things we all experience everyday, but do we really stop to ask ourselves this question:

 

****Are You Mobilizing Communities or Just a Voice in the Crowd?

 

I've personally covered events online, tweeting the main points live and although I was able to filter and capture the essence of what was going on, I had to go back and really absorb the information and then try to apply it to my business effectively. (not always an easy task) :-)

 

It's a juggling act but one I think we're all experiencing on one level or another.

 

Excerpt:

 

Continuous Partial Attention (CPA) is the process of paying simultaneous but superficial attention to a number of sources of incoming information.

 

This term, coined by writer and consultant Linda Stone in 1998, aptly describes the scene at the recent Council of Public Relations Firms Critical Issues Forum on Social Revolution:

 

This is what particularly caught my attention:

 

**What was the unintended consequence (UC) - these being outcomes that are not intended by a purposeful action?

 

**They can be positive, negative or have a perverse effect contrary to what was originally intended.

 

 

****So are there any unintended consequences to compulsively tweeting from an event or otherwise?

 

This is a question I have yet to answer. It is sort of like waiting to see what the side effects of a drug will be years after it has been approved.

 

One UC of CPA may be that peoples’ attention spans (already truncated by USA Today and sound bite television) and

 

**related ability for analytic thought will be reduced to nanoseconds.

 

I'd love to hear your Thoughts?

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/vNC1cn]


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Beth Kanter's comment, November 28, 2011 12:20 PM
I just rescooped this article because I found it in another source, but here I look further into your collection and find it. I'm curating on the topic information overload and coping skills. I believe that curation can help you pay attention. I experienced this myself .. I was a conference. Many people were tweeting. I was tracking it with storify - doing content curation in real time with twitter versus tweeting helped me pay attention, quickly put together a coherrent record of what happened and make it unstandable to people not in the room.
janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 12:59 PM
@BethKanter
I have covered a few conferences in real-time and it definitely makes you pay attention on more than one level. Being able to put it in a cohesive manner helping people understand what's happening is an art in itself and something you do very well.
Rescooped by Shirley Williams (XeeMe.com/ShirleyWilliams) from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Can Newspapers Re-Invent Themselves As Data Curated Platforms?

Can Newspapers Re-Invent Themselves As Data Curated Platforms? | All Things Curation | Scoop.it

Robin Good curated this piece and has some very interesting observations in addition the article.

 

 

Mathew Ingram makes a great point in this post I discovered thanks to Morten Myrstad: one way for Media groups to re-invent themselves is to think of themselves as data platforms and not newspapers any more.

 

 

Great point.

 

But I see one more: opening up to other news platforms too even if competing.

 

I appreciate this clearly faces cultural resistance but if you think of it really as a platform, you shouldn't be afraid to interface it with your competitors' just like Twitter has a LinkedIn App.

 

One missed opportunity I see that reflects this is the WSJ Facebook App: it's a great concept to let your readers remix the headlines but why not do it with non-WSJ content too? I'd love to see through a crowd sourced effort from the most WSJ active readers and curators how some WSJ-news relate to other news from say the FT or the Economist.

 

I’m going to make my music-industry analogy again (can’t escape my background…) but right now media groups think of building a record store or a radio station with their own artists. Imagine a radio that would play only Universal Music Group artists? It would suck, right? Yet, that’s what most media are today.

 

Don't you think the industry needs bold moves like this?


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etsyspot's comment, November 3, 2011 5:45 PM
good read. thnx designdrool abides.