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Nimbes trailer - pure magic

Nimbes Audiovisual piece – 15 minutes by Joanie Lemercier and James Ginzburg Soundtrack out now on Subtext recordings http://subtextrecordings.net Touring…
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Designer Creates Perfectly Useless Product Designs

Designer Creates Perfectly Useless Product Designs | all things creative | Scoop.it
Product designers are often preoccupied with making objects that are as useful as possible.
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so cool!
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Incredible Editing Technique Lets You Turn 2D Objects in a Photo Into 3D Objects You Can Manipulate

Incredible Editing Technique Lets You Turn 2D Objects in a Photo Into 3D Objects You Can Manipulate | all things creative | Scoop.it
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are blowing minds with
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New Photoshop Plugin: welcome live sharing!

New Photoshop Plugin: welcome live sharing! | all things creative | Scoop.it
Designers often need face time to make sure that complex projects are on track. Yet, chat rooms and presentation platforms tend to lack the tools for flexible and in-depth collaborations. If you’re a graphic,...
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davvero interessante!!!
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This search engine shows you 3D models of everything

This search engine shows you 3D models of everything | all things creative | Scoop.it
Are you a digital animator, 3D printmaker, or just like looking at cool rotating 3D models of things? Then Yobi3D is for you. The search engine, which launched in June, is basically the Google of...
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Can the Maker Movement Infiltrate Mainstream Classrooms? | Mind/Shift | KQED.org

Can the Maker Movement Infiltrate Mainstream Classrooms? | Mind/Shift | KQED.org | all things creative | Scoop.it
At the White House Maker Faire recently, where President Obama invited “makers” of all ages to display their creations, the President investigated a robotic giraffe, a red weather balloon and shot a marshmallow cannon made by a student. With so much fanfare and media attention on the event, some educators are hopeful that the idea of tinkering as a way of learning might finally have made it back to the mainstream. But will the same philosophy of discovery and hands-on learning make it into classrooms?“Most of the people that I know who got into science and technology benefited from a set of informal experiences before they had much formal training,” said Dale Dougherty, editor of Make Magazine and founder of Maker Faire on KQED’s Forum program. “And I mean, like building rockets in the backyard, tinkering, playing with things. And that created the interest and motivation to pursue science.”That spirit of play and discovery of knowledge is missing from much of formal education, Dougherty said. Students not only have no experience with making or the tools needed to build things, they’re often at a tactile deficit. “Schools haven’t changed, but the students have,” Dougherty said. “They don’t come with these experiences.”Dougherty often watches kids as they interact with hands-on experiments or materials at Maker Faire events. “It’s almost aggressively manipulating and touching things because they’re not used to it,” he said, which is unfortunate because that kind of work is in high demand in doing engineering or mechanical jobs.Click headline to rad more--
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See Highlights From “1968: Radical Italian Design” - Artinfo UK

See Highlights From “1968: Radical Italian Design” - Artinfo UK | all things creative | Scoop.it
Artinfo UK See Highlights From “1968: Radical Italian Design” Artinfo UK Through certain eyes, Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari's newly published book, “1968: Radical Italian Design” (Deste Foundation/Toilet Paper), with text contributions...
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