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All genetics
The page where you will find all best curiosityes about genome
Curated by Miguel J. Not
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FDA Panel Backs HCV Drugs - MedPage Today

FDA Panel Backs HCV Drugs - MedPage Today | All genetics | Scoop.it
Fox Baltimore
FDA Panel Backs HCV Drugs
MedPage Today
Simeprevir, another protease inhibitor, would be the third drug in the class, while sofosbuvir -- a nucleotide analog NS5B polymerase inhibitor -- would be the first in its class to get the nod.
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DNA untwister is a new tumour suppressor - Cancer Research UK ...

DNA untwister is a new tumour suppressor - Cancer Research UK ... | All genetics | Scoop.it
You have a lot of DNA in your cells, and we mean a lot. Every cell packs around two metres of the stuff into a space smaller than the head of a pin, thanks to an incredible feat of biological engineering.
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Epigenetics & Chromatin | Abstract | Gene dysregulation by histone ...

Epigenetics & Chromatin | Abstract | Gene dysregulation by histone ... | All genetics | Scoop.it
The incorporation of histone variants into nucleosomes is one of the main strategies that the cell uses to regulate the structure and function of chromatin. Histone H2A.Z is an evolutionarily conserved histone H2A variant that is ...
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DNA fingerprinting expert to deliver lecture - Times of India

DNA fingerprinting expert to deliver lecture - Times of India | All genetics | Scoop.it
DNA fingerprinting expert to deliver lecture
Times of India
He is known for his contribution to development of DNA fingerprinting techniques in the country.
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Genetics make black women more susceptible

Genetics make black women more susceptible | All genetics | Scoop.it

"New evidence suggests that black women have higher rates of breast cancer at younger ages due to a greater incidence of BRCA gene mutations.

BRCA mutations, which made headlines recently when they were linked to actress Angelina Jolie’s decision to get a preventive mastectomy, raise the risk of breast cancer considerably.

Research has shown that mutations in one of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 tumor-suppressing genes can raise a woman’s risk of breast cancer to 87 percent.

BRCA mutations are a problem typically associated with women of Eastern European Jewish descent. But it appears black women are at significant risk as well.

According to Dr. Jane Churpek, a cancer specialist and professor of medicine at the University of Chicago, past genetic studies regarding BRCA gene mutations have not included black women. 


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, October 17, 2013 7:54 PM

According to the article there are some alaming statistics about breast cancer for black women.

ASCO - 1 in 5 black women have BRCA mutations

CDC - breast cancer is the leading cause of death for black women aged 45-64

Back women are 60% more likely to die of breast cancer compared to white women even though there is less incidence of breast cancer with black women. 



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Your Digital DNA – The Physician’s Presence on the Internet

Your Digital DNA – The Physician’s Presence on the Internet | All genetics | Scoop.it

Remember that 5k that you ran in residency? The political article you wrote for an alternative newspaper as an undergrad? The pictures your friend recently posted of you on Facebook?

 

It all exists on the Internet.

According to a recent study by BrandYourSelf.com, there are over one billion names searched for on Google every single day. Of the people that search those names, 94% of them look only at the first page on Google. One in four people do not have any positive content on the first page of Google at all.

 

Positive or negative, it is an almost certainty that there is some information available about you digitally.

The problem? There is nothing you can do about it.

 

Before any speaking engagement, I always visit review sites (like ratemds.com) for physicians to find out more about the attendees in the audience. It helps me understand their digital footprint and where they stand on the Internet. At this particular engagement there was a very well respected physician known throughout the community as a brilliant doctor. You can imagine my surprise when I saw absolutely horrible reviews for this physician. Upon further inspection I realized that it was a different doctor in the same specialty practicing in a different state. They both had the same name and they were both M.D.’s.

 

The difference between the well-respected physician in the audience and the poorly reviewed doctor in a different state is the ladder had a strong digital footprint. He had a web page, a blog, articles published and a social media presence that went along with his poor reviews. The fact of the matter is, this poorly reviewed physician owned the first page of Google.

 

So what is the implication of a patient searching on Google for this well-respected physician’s name? If they do a cursory glance and don’t recognize the state where he practices, they could be confused into thinking that he’s a terrible physician without ever being seen as a patient.

 

Because no one has a completely unique name, your reputation of and a colleague’s poor Digital DNA can be completely confused.

While it is impossible to completely “push” someone down a Google search, it is possible to be proactive and start taking command of your digital footprint.

 

We’ll talk in a later post about steps you can take to strengthen your Digital DNA immediately. But first, it’s time to listen. What are people saying about you or your physicians on the Internet? What information is freely available about you on the first page of Google? I guarantee it’s not just the stagnant web page the hospital or practice has.

 

Action Steps:
1. Google your full name with and without your degree behind it
2. Google any variation of your name (ie, Ken or Kenneth)
3. Login to ratemds.com, healthgrades.com and Yelp!. Search for your name and see if anyone has reviewed you or one of your physicians
4. Write down the positive, negative and neutral information about you
5. Write down any links that are associated with your name but aren’t about you

How does it look? Leave your thoughts in the comments below. I’d love to hear from you!


Via Plus91
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Multiple, distinct Y chromosomes associated with significant excess risk of ... - Medical Xpress

Multiple, distinct Y chromosomes associated with significant excess risk of ... - Medical Xpress | All genetics | Scoop.it
Multiple, distinct Y chromosomes associated with significant excess risk of ...
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Gene regulation differences between humans and chimpanzees ...

Gene regulation differences between humans and chimpanzees ... | All genetics | Scoop.it
Changes in gene regulation have been used to study the evolutionary chasm that exists between humans and chimpanzees despite their largely identical DNA. However, scientists from the University of Chicago have ...
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X chromosome actually looks like pasta, not the letter X - USA TODAY

X chromosome actually looks like pasta, not the letter X - USA TODAY | All genetics | Scoop.it
9NEWS.com
X chromosome actually looks like pasta, not the letter X
USA TODAY
Here's your fun fact for the day: Contrary to popular belief, the X chromosome isn't shaped like an X at all — something that scientists have actually long been aware of.
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What Are Genetically Recoded Organisms?

What Are Genetically Recoded Organisms? | All genetics | Scoop.it

Researchers have developed a new kind of genetic engineering that may be safer, with the power to make never-before-seen types of protein.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Nick Roberts's curator insight, October 17, 2013 11:55 PM

Genetically, all of life on Earth speaks the same language. Our genetic material is essentially made up of our DNA. All living things on Earth can see that the same way. Cells from other species are able to read each other's DNA. Example: biologists put the human gene for eyes on a fruit fly's leg and the fruit fly's cells made a fruit fly eye.

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Data-driven medicine: understanding the link between genetics and disease - Telegraph

Data-driven medicine: understanding the link between genetics and disease - Telegraph | All genetics | Scoop.it
Activities that involve gathering vast quantities of data are often portrayed in a negative light, but Sophie Curtis reveals how 'big data' is also being used to identify the links between genetics and diseases such as cancer, diabetes and...

Via Thomas Faltin
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