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What farms can do for cities

What farms can do for cities | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
The author talks about her new book, Urban Farms, the difference between a farm and a garden, and how city farmers are moving beyond the trend factor.

 

Too often we teach about cities and urban systems one one side of a spectrum and agricultural and rural land use on the other.  Here is some fuel for the gristmill.     


Via Seth Dixon, Harmony Social Studies
Alison Antonelli's insight:

I personally think that farms go unappreciated. If we did not have farms we would not have half or any of the food we have today. This interview puts a lot of things into perspective on how farms can help out our cities and improve the overall food industry. 

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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Harmony Social Studies
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What farms can do for cities

What farms can do for cities | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
The author talks about her new book, Urban Farms, the difference between a farm and a garden, and how city farmers are moving beyond the trend factor.

 

Too often we teach about cities and urban systems one one side of a spectrum and agricultural and rural land use on the other.  Here is some fuel for the gristmill.     


Via Seth Dixon, Harmony Social Studies
Alison Antonelli's insight:

I personally think that farms go unappreciated. If we did not have farms we would not have half or any of the food we have today. This interview puts a lot of things into perspective on how farms can help out our cities and improve the overall food industry. 

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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Agricultural Biodiversity
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Why Is Squash Called Squash?

Why Is Squash Called Squash? | Alie's Page | Scoop.it

It's an adapted version of a Narragansett Native American word that translates to eaten raw or uncooked (RT @SmithsonianMag: Why is squash called squash?


Via Luigi Guarino
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This article was rather interesting because who would think to wonder why we name certain things? When I was reading this article I learned that we name the vegetable "squash" becasue the Narrgannsett Native Americans had the word "askutasquash" which means you can eat it raw or cooked. I did not know that this word came from the Narrgansett Native Americans. 

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Sandy Williams Spencer's curator insight, January 30, 10:05 AM

Pretty interesting article!

Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Political and Urban Organization of Space
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America’s Mood Map: An Interactive Guide to the United States of Attitude

America’s Mood Map: An Interactive Guide to the United States of Attitude | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
West Virginia is the most neurotic state, Utah is the most agreeable and the folks of Wisconsin are the country's most extroverted, a new study says.

Via Karri McGovern
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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from A Cultural History of Advertising
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Ad Recall: Why That Ad Wasn't as Awesome as You Thought-brand linkage

Ad Recall: Why That Ad Wasn't as Awesome as You Thought-brand linkage | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
In 1971, a luggage brand introduced an ad featuring a gorilla beating up on a suitcase that would become one of the most famous in advertising history.

Via k3hamilton
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k3hamilton's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:22 PM

on brand linkage

Cory Kelly's curator insight, December 2, 2013 5:44 PM

#brandlinkage: the difference between good and bad #adrecall

Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Ana's portfolio
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Video: "EAT" by Rick Mereki

Foods from around the world...This is a playful video clip that leads students to have more questions than answers about different places.  The spirit of exploration and experimentation is at the heart of this global traveler's montage of delightful dishes.  Watching this encourages viewers to open their minds to new ideas, cultures and places. 


Via Seth Dixon, Ana Cristina Gil
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This is an interesting video because some people are extremely particular with what they eat. I like this video because it makes the viewers of the video wonder what they actually could be missing out on with all of the wonderful food they could be consuming. 

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Seth Dixon's comment, November 16, 2011 7:05 PM
When younger we are afraid to be anything different...ironic now that we both want to try everything exotic and experience the cultural richness that is embodied by various culinary delights.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:58 PM

Watching this video made me hungry hahaha. This video is a good example of why we should try different food. Living in the united state has giving me the opportunity to learn about different culture. I feel that  if we try different food we are not only becoming less judgmental but we are also contributing economically. We don’t have to go to Italy to enjoy a great pizza. We can go stay here and spend our money here. At the long run it will help our economy to grow more efficiently. Made In America!!!

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:55 PM

Even though this video barely had any words it still said a lot. It showed so many different foods from so many different places. It was pretty awesome to see the different foods that different cultures put together. One thing that I thought was funny was when the guy was eating the candy apple with popcorn attatched to it. I've had a candy apple and I've had popcorn, but never together. It would be intersting to know what country that was from. Also another thing that really cuaght my eye in the video was when the guy ate the cricket! What country eats crickets as part of their meal? That is so crazy. Meals really do tell a lot about the culture of a particular place. It is amazing to me that just from a simple dish you can learn so much about a countries culture. The first thing I always do when I go somewhere new is try the food. I have to say I loved Italy!

Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Geography Education
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Population 7 Billion

Population 7 Billion | Alie's Page | Scoop.it

"Just 200 years ago, there were only 1 billion people on the planet, and over the next 150 years, that number grew to 3 billion. But in the past 50 years, the global population has more than doubled, and the UN projects that it could possibly grow to 15 billion by the year 2100. As the international organization points out, this increasing rate of change brings with it enormous challenges."

 


Via Seth Dixon
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This should definitely be a major concern for the human planet becasue if people are multiplying that quickly and staying alive longer than the futre could be facing some serious problems. For example; the food supply could run low, shelter could definitely become scarce, diease could become a high risk becuase there are so many people that are close which means they could be sharing a number of things. 

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Roman Mirando's curator insight, September 10, 9:17 AM

At first, the world's population did not grow a lot. Now we are growing about 1 billion in 12 years, that is scary compared to the 200 years we grew about 1 billion. These are some pictures of some highly dense populations. It is even scarier that in 2100 the population is suspected to be 15 billion.

jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 9:25 AM

Over the years our world population has grown enormously. Almost  200 years ago there was only 1 billion people in the world, and as time went on the population started to increase dramatically. By 2100, geographers say the population will grow to be 150 million people in the world. The population continues to grow throughout time, we therefore should be cautious on how we are to our environment.

Robert Hardy Simpkins's curator insight, September 10, 9:29 AM

The fact that in just 86 years we will have 15 billion people in our world is a very scary thought.will we have enough resources to account for all the people on Earth. Will there be multiple diseases killing people off. Our population needs to be controlled.

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New York train crash kills four

New York train crash kills four | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
At least four people are killed and dozens injured as a passenger train derails in New York City, prompting a major emergency services response.
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This is a crazy story because some people are blaming the conductor of the train on texting and driving, speed, not paying attention, or just something went wrong with the train. Four people died in this train accident and some left injured. This story is at the top of the list on the news and continues to be with all on the details unravaling.

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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from World Environment Nature News
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A beautiful but deadly liquid metal

A beautiful but deadly liquid metal | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
The world aims to eradicate that quixotic bad boy of the periodic table, mercury, but eliminating the biggest source of emissions is easier said than done.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from World Environment Nature News
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Rising tide of asylum seekers spills into Serbian forests

Rising tide of asylum seekers spills into Serbian forests | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
BOGOVADJA, Serbia (Reuters) - With winter approaching, hundreds of asylum seekers from Africa and the Middle East are living in a forest in Serbia without access to basic amenities, a sign of the Balkan...

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from World Environment Nature News
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EU restrictions on 3 bee-killing insecticides enter into force

EU restrictions on 3 bee-killing insecticides enter into force | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
EU restrictions on 3 bee-killing insecticides enter into force

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Geography Education
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McDonald’s® Packaging

McDonald’s® Packaging | Alie's Page | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:34 AM

It is sad that so much foods gets wasted all the time because it doesn't look appealing to buyers. Just because some potaoe is shaped funny or is a little darker or lighter than what is considered "normal", it is thrown away. To me, that is ridiculous when so many people are starving around the world. Or that these imperfect foods are given to animals for consumption. Why is it acceptable to animals to eat bad food when we are going to eat those animals? Somewhere down the line of history, the way we view food has been changed and not for the better. If we want to be able to sustain ourselves and this world for many more centuries, we need to revalute how we look at food. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 7, 2013 9:58 AM

I have eaten McDonalds fries and bunch of times and never thought about what 'golden standard" actually meant. McDonalds like it says in the article is one of the top potoate buyers in the world. I'm sure most other fast food places aren' too far behind. However since McDonalds is one of the top buyers of potatoes farmers much make sure they produce enough of the potatoes that McDonalds sells. However it doesn't stop there. Not only do farmers have to produce enough potatoes, but they have to produce quality potatoes. All of McDonalds fries look exactly the same. You never really get a french fry that looks extremely different. That is done on purpose. McDonalds only purchases potatoes that meet their "golden standard". This makes you think how much goes to watste. Farmers are probably discarding "bad" potatoes all the time that don't meet the "golden standard". Does it really matter what the fries look like, if they taste the same? There are people in the world who are hungry, yet we waste food like this all the time. I really don't think it is that big of a deal if not every french fry looks exactly the same. We should make an attempt at trying to limit our food waste. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:42 PM

Fries are the essential food that everyone enjoys in the world. But it is a good thing because if a potato has a growth defect probably that would affect someone and that is a law suit waiting to happen. In the United States people love suing for anything that they could probably win and receive money. The fries are delicious but they are so fattening that could really effect people if they have any issues with there health. 

Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Autism News
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High-school football player with autism scores his first touchdown

High-school football player with autism scores his first touchdown | Alie's Page | Scoop.it

Via Autism Daily Newscast
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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Local Food Systems
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Washington State Voters Turn Down GMO Food Labels - TIME

Washington State Voters Turn Down GMO Food Labels - TIME | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
International Business Times
Washington State Voters Turn Down GMO Food Labels
TIME
By nearly ten points, voters in Washington State rejected a ballot initiative that would have required labels on foods containing genetically-engineered ingredients.

Via Bill Palladino - MLUI
Alison Antonelli's insight:

I think that when buying any kind of food there would be everything known about the food on the lable. Consumers should know what is in there food before injesting in into their body and potentially harming themselves in case there was something their body could react to.

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Bill Palladino - MLUI's curator insight, November 6, 2013 12:56 PM

The big test referendum in Washington on GMO labeling failed.

Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Agricultural Biodiversity
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Hunger and malnutrition | Eat This Podcast

Hunger and malnutrition | Eat This Podcast | Alie's Page | Scoop.it

The Jess & Jeremy Show goes on the road. All food security and nutrition, all the time. http://t.co/PI9FJH0MmC


Via Luigi Guarino
Alison Antonelli's insight:

After reading this article, it puts some things into perspective because of how much some people may take their food for granted. There are so many undeveloped countries have such a little food to go around that the countries that have enough food should not waste it. Many people are dying due to hunger and malnutrition.. Some countries should be more aware of this hunger issue and not waste food. 

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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Political and Urban Organization of Space
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These two maps are incredibly important to Obamacare

These two maps are incredibly important to Obamacare | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
They explain the states that oppose Obamacare–and the national groups trying to implement it.

Via Karri McGovern
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This is interesting because these two maps show a significant change in the poverty levels of the United States. The top map shows the coverage of medicad in the US and the lower map clearly doesn't have as much. So many people in the US do not have healthcare that it can show via these maps.

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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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When "Yes" means "No" in cross cultural communication - uGlobaleyes

When "Yes" means "No" in cross cultural communication - uGlobaleyes | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
You’re in a meeting and you ask your teammate if they can get their project done before next week. They say yes and go on to describe their plans with family who are visiting from India this week.  What do you do next?

Via Charles Tiayon
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This is an awesomea article because in so many culturals yes and no can mean so many different things. I enjoyed reading this article because it has so many levels of the truth when you really think about it. 

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 28, 2013 4:51 AM

You’re in a meeting and you ask your teammate if they can get their project done before next week. They say yes and go on to describe their plans with family who are visiting from India this week.  What do you do next? Do you go on with your meeting expecting the work will be done, or do you stop and ask your teammate when they think they can complete their project? If you’re from a low context culture (like the U.S.) the chances are good you will choose the first option, but if your teammate is from a high context culture (like India or China) the chances are good you should have chosen the second.

The concept of high and low context cultures is an important part of cross cultural communication. When low context cultures communicate, most of the information communicated is right there in the verbal message you hear, but when high context cultures communicate there is minimal information in the actual message; the listener is expected to add a lot of personal and environmental information to the message. So you may hear “yes” when someone is really saying “no.”  An article in Quartz entitled How different cultures say “I disagree”  describes some of the surprising ways people from different cultures may say “no.”

“Germans disagree openly, considering it to be the most honest way. Americans and Finns are also admirably frank and direct. French people disagree openly, but politely. In the East Asian cultures, open disagreement is taboo—indeed most Asians are nervous about it. British people also dislike open conflict and use various instances of coded speech to soften their opposition in conversation.”

The article goes on to list some funny, and fairly accurate, examples of how people from different cultures prefer to express their disagreement, and recommends reviewing your message from the other person’s cultural perspective as the solution to better communication.  But trying to understand your message from another cultural perspective is problematic.

Building mutual understanding usually means taking the time to actively listen to one another and check meanings.  You may also want to avoid some things to improve cross cultural communication, such as slang, double questions like; “do you want to go on or shall we stop here?” and negative questions like; “don’t you want to go?”  In English “yes” usually means an affirmative answer and “no” a negative answer, but in other cultures “yes” may indicate right and “no” may indicate wrong, so wording questions clearly may make it easier to mean “no” even if the other person doesn’t say it.

Ultimately underestimating the cultural side of communication can have unexpected consequences, but knowing the impact cultural context can have when you communicate, and  taking the time to listen and check meaning will help you avoid misunderstandings, and missed deadlines.

Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Cayo Scoop! Bestofcayo.com's E-mag.
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Belize Intangible Cultural Heritage Workshop

Belize Intangible Cultural Heritage Workshop | Alie's Page | Scoop.it

Cayo is represented well at the Belize Intangible Cultural Heritage Workshop currently happening at the Banquitas House of Culture in Orange Walk.  NICH is celebrating its 10 year anniversary, and at this event they are working with UNESCO during the workshop.

 

"National Workshop on Community-Based inventorying of Belize Intangible Cultural Heritage happening in Northern Belize for 8 days, brings forth the splendor of the rich cultural vibrancy in our Jewel"

 

https://www.facebook.com/BenqueViejoDelCarmen/posts/232447303578000


Via Best of Cayo
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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Geography Education
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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.


Via Seth Dixon
Alison Antonelli's insight:

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Population Reference Bureau

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Population Reference Bureau | Alie's Page | Scoop.it

The 2013 World Population Data Sheet lists all geopolitical entities with populations of 150,000 or more and all members of the UN. These include sovereign states, dependencies, overseas departments, and some territories whose status or boundaries may be undetermined or in dispute.

 

More developed regions, following the UN classification, comprise all of Europe and North America, plus Australia, Japan, and New Zealand.

 

All other regions and countries are classified as less developed.

 

The least developed countries consist of 49 countries with especially low incomes, high economic vulnerability, and poor human development indicators; 34 of these countries are in sub-Saharan Africa, 14 in Asia, and one in the Caribbean.

 

The criteria and list of countries, as defined by the United Nations, can be found at http://www.unohrlls.org/en/ldc/25/. ;

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Seth Dixon, Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Alison Antonelli's insight:

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Hoopla Surrounding World Cup Draw Continues to Rise - US Soccer.com

Hoopla Surrounding World Cup Draw Continues to Rise - US Soccer.com | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
Bleacher Report
Hoopla Surrounding World Cup Draw Continues to Rise
US Soccer.com
When the draw for the 2014 FIFA World Cup is conducted on Friday, Dec.
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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Dirds: Where nature meets Photoshop

Dirds: Where nature meets Photoshop | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
Photoshop is great for shaving off a few pounds (or ribs), creating a glowing complexion or…letting man’s best friend take flight?

Via Thomas Faltin
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This just looks disturbing.

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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from World Environment Nature News
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African elephant numbers 'could fall by one-fifth' due to poaching

African elephant numbers 'could fall by one-fifth' due to poaching | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
The scale of the elephant poaching epidemic could lead to local populations becoming extinct, an IUCN report says

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This is an interesting article. I never knew that Africa lost one fifth of all of their elephants in a single year. Most of the elephants are dying due to poaching and habitat loss. 

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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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20 Stunning Closeups Of Snowflakes That Will Change The Way You See Nature | Distractify.com

20 Stunning Closeups Of Snowflakes That Will Change The Way You See Nature | Distractify.com | Alie's Page | Scoop.it

Alexey Kljatov is a Moscow-based photographer who takes a special interest in shooting snowflakes.

 

With a camera, a lense, some household objects, and some handiwork, he forges an entire system that enables him to capture amazing, almost surreal images of nature’s most intricate creations.

 

Click headline to read more and view the pix full screen--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This is amazing. I never knew an actual snowflake could actually look like beautiful. By zooming in with a camera you can see all of the wonderful details that this snowflake offers. Theres no much that goes into it and it just simply melts awayw within seconds.

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Rescooped by Alison Antonelli from Gems for a Happy Family Life
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Mothers With Children Under 5 Most Active on Social Media [STUDY]

Mothers With Children Under 5 Most Active on Social Media [STUDY] | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
A new study claims that U.S. mothers with children under the age of 5 are twice as active on social media than the general public.

Via Angie Mc
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Angie Mc's curator insight, November 5, 2013 9:40 PM

The study shows that as children grow older, mothers' social media activity decrease. I'm curious if the dip in use by mothers is when they are tending to the outside activities of their children. Yet, I found that once my children began to drive, my social media time began increasing again.  

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Knowledge and prevention of tick-borne diseases vary across an urban-to-rural human land-use gradient

Knowledge and prevention of tick-borne diseases vary across an urban-to-rural human land-use gradient | Alie's Page | Scoop.it
Knowledge and prevention of tick-borne diseases vary across an urban-to-rural human land-use gradient http://t.co/uRiuwam59e

Via Donna MacPherson Lugar
Alison Antonelli's insight:

This is something important to know. If there is a disease going around then you should know about it to prevent yourself from getting it. 

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