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Scientists generate 281-gigapixel cell map using electron microscope

Scientists generate 281-gigapixel cell map using electron microscope | Algae | Scoop.it

Electron microscopes can produce incredibly detailed and even 3D views of sub-cellular structures, but often at the cost of losing the bigger picture. Researchers at Leiden University in the Netherlands, however, have leveraged a technique called virtual nanoscopy that enables researchers to observe the whole of a cell and its intricate details in a single image.


Via Anne Osterrieder, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste - Cleantech Solutions

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste - Cleantech Solutions | Algae | Scoop.it

Food waste management is a big problem in all countries, especially affluent ones. There are numerous places which generate large amounts of food waste including hotels, restaurants, malls, residential societies, college/school/office canteens, airline caterers, markets etc .A proper food waste management strategy needs to be devised for them to make sure that either they are disposed off in a safe manner or utilized efficiently.

 


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Solar Energy in South Africa - Cleantech Solutions

Solar Energy in South Africa - Cleantech Solutions | Algae | Scoop.it

The renewable resource with the greatest potential in South Africa is solar energy. The total area of high radiation in South Africa amounts to approximately 194,000 km2, including the Northern Cape, one of the best solar resource areas in the world, as proved by Eskom’s initiative to build 100MW CSP Power Project in Upington.


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Saudi Arabia Biorefinery from Algae (SABA) Project | EcoMENA

Saudi Arabia Biorefinery from Algae (SABA) Project | EcoMENA | Algae | Scoop.it
The primary mission of the SABA project is to develop the Algae Based Biorefinery - ABB biotechnology putting into operation innovative, sustainable, and commercially viable solutions for green chemistry, energy, bio-products, water conservation,...

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CCRES: Invest in Milking Microbes

CCRES: Invest in Milking Microbes | Algae | Scoop.it

From Bacteria to Biofuel

 

What if we could take a soil bacteria and tinker with its genes to create a biofuel much in the same way that a cow produces milk? Well, we can, or at least a team of scientists has figured out how to do it, and the next step is figuring out how to make it happen on a commercial scale.

The common soil bacterium Raistonia eutropha produces complex carbon compounds when stressed, and according to MIT, its scientists have engineered the bacterium’s genes to produce isobutanol, which can be substituted for or blended with gasoline.

 

CCRES ALGAE PROJECT
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CCRES: Free radicals

CCRES: Free radicals | Algae | Scoop.it
Free radicals

In the body, free radicals are produced when oxygen combines with complex
metabolic molecules. Free radicals are highly unstable molecules ready to
react with anything they can. When they react, the result is called “oxidation.”
Once the oxidation process begins, it can produce a chain reaction that generates
more free radicals.
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CCRES: Astaxanthin from Haematococcus pluvialis

CCRES: Astaxanthin from Haematococcus pluvialis | Algae | Scoop.it

Astaxanthin, a member of the carotenoid family, it is a dark red pigment and the main carotenoid found in algae and aquatic animals. It is responsible for the red/pink coloration of crustaceans, shellfish, and the flesh of salmonoids. Algatechnologies produces astaxanthin from the microalga Haematococcus pluvialis, the richest known natural source for astaxanthin.
Astaxanthin however, is more than just a red pigment, it is primarily an extremely powerful antioxidant. It has the unique capacity to quench free radicals and reactive species of oxygen and to inhibit lipid peroxidation. Studies have shown astaxanthin to be over 500 times stronger than vitamin E and much more potent than other carotenoids such as lutein, lycopene and β-carotene.
Astaxanthin was found to have beneficial effects in many health conditions related to the Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders, skin health, joint health, muscle endurance, as well as to the cardiovascular, immune, eye and other systems.

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A Crystal Clear Explanation of How Social Media Influences SEO

A Crystal Clear Explanation of How Social Media Influences SEO | Algae | Scoop.it



"More and more, search engines have begun to incorporate social context into their search results. And it's high time we dive into what role social context is playing in SEO, and how marketers can adjust their strategies to match the changing character of search. So without further ado, let's get into the nitty gritty of what's being called "social search" and learn how it affects marketers.

"Social search" is an evolving term for the way in which search engines factor a user's social network -- also referred to as social graph -- into how results are displayed after a search query. In social search, content that has a social connection to you in some way is prioritized. A social connection could mean someone you are linked to via Facebook, Twitter, or any other major social network. Alternately, some forms of social search prioritize content that has been shared by social media influencers, even if those experts aren't directly tied to you".

Read more: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/33662/A-Crystal-Clear-Explanation-of-How-Social-Media-Influences-SEO.aspx


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Renewable energy job market continues growing - The Desert Sun

Renewable energy job market continues growing - The Desert Sun | Algae | Scoop.it
Renewable energy job market continues growingThe Desert SunAs the green industry continues to grow and evolve, experts say it means not only more construction, installation and maintenance jobs, but also expanding career opportunities that require...

 

 If this is not your field, you NEED a Home Business


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The Outlook for Energy: A view to 2040

The Outlook for Energy: A view to 2040 | Algae | Scoop.it

 

The electricity generation sector is essential to meeting modern energy needs. Utilities and other electricity producers transform different types of primary energy – everything from natural gas to coal to wind and hydroelectric power – into electricity to be used in homes and businesses. Through 2040, global demand for electricity will continue to rise steeply, as the fuels used for electricity generation continue to shift to lower-carbon sources, such as natural gas, nuclear and renewables.


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Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built...

Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built... | Algae | Scoop.it

 

At DLD Cities in London, he said "cities have centers that celebrate previous centuries -- in Europe, the cities celebrated spirituality, with cathedrals. After some time, the cathedrals became downtown cores- and celebrations of capitalism and commercialism".

The cities of the future will celebrate "the belief of what keeps us alive" - or elements of the city that make our lives better.

 

Terreform ONE, a green design company in Brooklyn, explores biohacks for the ecological issues facing modern cities. For instance, the waste New York City produces every hour weighs as much as the Statue of Liberty - in the future that waste could be recompacted into building blocks, or recycled "bales". Looking beyond recycling, though, it would be even better to create a city which didn't produce waste in the first place...

That means growing thousands of homes -- building a new suburb could involve twisting, pruning and manipulating large trees into the frames of buildings. "There would be no difference between the home and nature -- it would be something that would be a positive addition to the ecology," explained Joachim.

 

For more information on these innovative concepts, including biomimicry and new green technology proposals for future cities, stop by to read the complete article and visit referenced links on urban sustainability...


Via Lauren Moss, Rowan Edwards, Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Get ready for solar sharing communities — Cleantech News and ...

Get ready for solar sharing communities — Cleantech News and ... | Algae | Scoop.it

 A bill making its way through the Legislature in California will expand the public's access to solar energy by making it easier for renters and others ...


Via Les Walgreen
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Unusual symbiosis found between algae and nitrogen-fixing bacteria

Unusual symbiosis found between algae and nitrogen-fixing bacteria | Algae | Scoop.it

The partnership plays an important role in fertilizing the oceans by taking nitrogen from the atmosphere and "fixing" it into a form that other organisms can use.


Via Laran, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture,CCRES


Via Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Production of Cellulosic Ethanol - BioEnergy Consult

Production of Cellulosic Ethanol - BioEnergy Consult | Algae | Scoop.it
Cellulosic ethanol technology is one of the most commonly discussed second-generation biofuel technologies worldwide. The production of cellulosic ethanol from biomass can be achieved through biochemical or thermochemical methods.

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A Glance at Bioenergy Technologies - Cleantech Solutions

A Glance at Bioenergy Technologies - Cleantech Solutions | Algae | Scoop.it

Bioenergy generation can be tailored to rural or urban environments, and utilized in domestic, commercial or industrial applications.


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Biogas from Animal Wastes | EcoMENA

Biogas from Animal Wastes | EcoMENA | Algae | Scoop.it

Anaerobic digestion is a unique treatment solution for animal wastes as it can deliver positive benefits related to multiple issues, including renewable energy, water pollution, and air emissions. Anaerobic digestion of animal manure is gaining popularity as a means to protect the environment and to recycle materials efficiently into the farming systems.

 


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CCRES: Invest in Milking Microbes

CCRES: Invest in Milking Microbes | Algae | Scoop.it

From Bacteria to Biofuel

 

What if we could take a soil bacteria and tinker with its genes to create a biofuel much in the same way that a cow produces milk? Well, we can, or at least a team of scientists has figured out how to do it, and the next step is figuring out how to make it happen on a commercial scale.

The common soil bacterium Raistonia eutropha produces complex carbon compounds when stressed, and according to MIT, its scientists have engineered the bacterium’s genes to produce isobutanol, which can be substituted for or blended with gasoline.

 

CCRES ALGAE PROJECT
part of 
Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources (CCRES)

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CCRES: CCRES Low Carbon Fuels in Aviation

CCRES: CCRES Low Carbon Fuels in Aviation | Algae | Scoop.it
Biofuels are key to industry’s future  In a bid to reduce its dependency on imported oil and tackle global warming, the EU has committed to raising the share of fuels from renewable sources in transport to 10% by 2020 – including biofuels, hydrogen and green electricity. For the growing aviation industry, the switch to plant-based fuel is seen as not only environmentally smart, but a sensible financial move in an era or rising conventional fuel prices and worries about supply security. Biofuel use in passenger aircraft is still a novelty, and industry officials are urging governments to help lift supplies, much as policies in the EU and United States have created a flourishing market in plant-based oils for motor vehicles. The industry contends that sustainable fuels will reduce emissions even as passenger traffic grows. The airline sector has committed to meet 10% of its overall fuel consumption with biofuels by 2017 – though the goal is ambitious given that it is to account for just 1% by 2015... Meanwhile, more doubts are being raised about the environmental benefits of biofuels.
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CCRES: Astaxanthin carotenoid

CCRES: Astaxanthin carotenoid | Algae | Scoop.it

Astaxanthin, unlike several carotenes and one other known carotenoid, is not converted to vitamin A (retinol) in the human body. Like other carotenoids, astaxanthin has self-limited absorption orally and such low toxicity by mouth that no toxic syndrome is known.

CCRES ALGAE

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AUSTRALIA: Farmers urged to embrace algae crops

AUSTRALIA: Farmers urged to embrace algae crops | Algae | Scoop.it

 

 

Science writer Julian Cribb says it is an essential future industry.

 

Mr Cribb has presented his idea to the International Rural Network conference at Whyalla in South Australia, saying algae farming can provide fuel and the food supply for fish farming.

He said it was being done overseas but yet to be embraced in Australia.

 

"We need to double food production worldwide to feed 10 billion people by about the 2060s," he said.

 

"The trouble with that is that everything we need to double food production is running out."

He said essential elements of food production, such as fresh water, available land, fertilisers and stable climates were in decline.

 

But Mr Cribb said algae could be a way forward.

 

He said it could be cultivated in states such as South Australia with sunlight, large areas of flat land and use of salt water.

 

"People in Australia need to realise that we've got the largest resource of sunlight on Earth," he said.

 

"Sunlight grows crops, it grows things like algae."

 

Mr Cribb said each hectare of algae could produce 50-100 barrels of oil.

 

"You could probably grow the whole of South Australia's liquid fuel requirements," he said.

"That's [for] every car, every truck, every ship, every train and every plane from an area no bigger than a single large sheep station."

 

Aquaculture boost

 

Mr Cribb said aquaculture could achieve huge benefits.

 

"To feed those fish you're going to have to grow algae because it's going to be too expensive to feed them on grain," he said.

 

He said fish farming could help overcome depletion of fish numbers in the oceans.

"The world catch has been declining every year since 2004. We've already gone through the oceans," he said.

 

Mr Cribb said people would need to change their diets and embrace species best suited to farming.

 

"You can get 10 tonnes of barramundi from one hectare of pond, so it's a very high-yielding and highly-productive industry," he said.

 

"South Australia's already very good at farming fish, but the future aquaculture industry is going to be worth $5 billion - it's going to be bigger than beef, sheep, pork and poultry put together."

Mr Cribb said countries such as Israel, China and the United States were already embracing algae for fuel production.

 

He said algal fuels were being used by the US air force and navy.

 

"There was a big American military exercise about a month ago where every plane that took off from an aircraft carrier was fuelled by algae," he said.

 

He said imagination and investment would allow an industry to develop and expand in South Australia.

 

"We need the imagination to understand that South Australia is actually the best place in the world to do this because you've got open skies and more sunlight than almost anywhere in Australia," he said.

 

"There are a lot of very innovative farmers in SA and I think some of them would think about growing water crops, beside growing land crops.

 

"That is the opportunity of the future, instead of the big oil companies drilling for stuff, it is for farmers to actually grow it."

 

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Designing an Olympic Village with a green afterlife for Rio 2016 | SmartPlanet

Designing an Olympic Village with a green afterlife for Rio 2016 | SmartPlanet | Algae | Scoop.it
The winning design of the Olympic Village for the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio call for a green neighborhood to replace the village when the games end.

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Lamp powered by sun and wind

Lamp powered by sun and wind | Algae | Scoop.it
ANOTHER first for Lismore: we are hosts to the first hybrid solar and wind powered streetlight to be trialled in Australia.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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New Method of Turning Sewage Sludge into Biodiesel is Low-Cost, High-Yield

New Method of Turning Sewage Sludge into Biodiesel is Low-Cost, High-Yield | Algae | Scoop.it

But if a new process for making biodiesel from sewage sludge gets commercialized, every flush of the toilet could be helping to fuel some of our energy needs.


Via Hans De Keulenaer, SustainOurEarth
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Algae 101: Part 50 : U.S. Farm Policy, Algae and Our Children

Algae 101: Part 50 : U.S. Farm Policy, Algae and Our Children | Algae | Scoop.it

 Farm policies endow government-sponsored research to Land Grant Universities, extension service agents...


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