Algae
Follow
3.2K views | +2 today
 
Scooped by CCRES
onto Algae
Scoop.it!

Letters: food for fish

Letters: food for fish | Algae | Scoop.it
We need to grow seaweed and algae on industrial levels to replace the fish feed currently used which is harming the environment
CCRES's insight:

Considering two-thirds of Earth is covered in water, what is keeping us from growing enough algae and seaweed to use as feed for fish?

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Algae
Curated by CCRES
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Algae on Vimeo

Vimeo is the home for high-quality videos and the people who love them.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Survival of the fattest | Peter Mooij | TEDxDelft - YouTube

"Every breath you take, half the oxygen you exhale was produced by micro algae,” say Peter Mooij. He calls them global players, who have been here before all...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

CCRES FUCUS

CCRES FUCUS | Algae | Scoop.it
Fucus vesiculosus, may be an effective alternative treatment for hypothyroidism for some people as it contains iodine found naturally in the sea. Hypothyroidism, also called underactive thyroid, is...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Stuff

CCRES's insight:

Supreme Biotechnologies, founded four years ago, uses algae grown in a Wakatu Estate factory to produce the antioxidant astaxanthin, used in dietary supplements. #CCRES #ALGAE TEAM

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Green algae may brighten outlook for those with macular degeneration

Green algae may brighten outlook for those with macular degeneration | Algae | Scoop.it
The annual symposium on macular degeneration will be held Saturday, Jan. 17. Speakers will discuss the latest technology involving green algae.
CCRES's insight:

The promise is incredible. This is really, really interesting and it’s going to permeate all medicine. #CCRES #ALGAE TEAM

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Muradel Site Video - YouTube

An aerial view of the Muradel Demonstration Plant, Whyalla South Australia.
CCRES's insight:

Renewable fuels company Muradel has launched Australia’s first integrated demonstration plant to sustainably convert algae into green crude, as a step towards a commercial plant with the potential to produce 80 million liters of crude oil a year. The $10.7 million demonstration plant at Whyalla – officially opened Oct. 31, 2014 – is intended to produce 30,000 liters of green crude a year, using Muradel’s Green2Black™ technology. #CCRES #ALGAE TEAM

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Algae

Algae | Algae | Scoop.it
Vimeo is the home for high-quality videos and the people who love them.
CCRES's insight:


Join the movement! Every day, CCRES supporters fight to make environmental education, clean energy solutions, and the green economy a reality. Add your voice to our rapidly expanding network of grassroots activists. Sign up.

"CCRES is a member-based non-profit organization with membership open to research institutions, public and private sector organizations, students, and individuals." says Zeljko Serdar, President & CEO of CCRES.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by CCRES from Algae
Scoop.it!

CCRES algae team

CCRES algae team | Algae | Scoop.it
CCRES's insight:

"Convert waste problems to energy opportunities."

CCRES ALGAE TEAM

more...
CCRES's curator insight, September 2, 2014 3:15 PM

At present, most #astaxanthin is chemically synthesized, costs up to US$7,500 per kilogram, and is only suitable for adding to animal feed, rather than for human consumption, but astaxanthin from the #microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis, the richest known natural source of astaxanthin has the potential to expand for large-scale production said Zeljko Serdar, project leader of #CCRES algae team.

CCRES's curator insight, October 17, 2014 4:14 AM

http://solarserdar.blogspot.com/2014/10/palmaria-palmata-fights-ebola.html

Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Treating Hepatitis C with Chlorella - YouTube

Subscribe for free to Dr. Greger's videos at: http://bit.ly/nutritionfactsupdates DESCRIPTION: Improvements in natural killer cell immune function may explai...
CCRES's insight:

Chlorella is a genus of single-celled green algae belonging to the phylum Chlorophyta. It is spherical, measuring between 2 and 10 μm in diameter. Chlorella contains chlorophyll in its chloroplast. Through photosynthesis it multiplies rapidly requiring only carbon dioxide, water, sunlight, and a small amount of minerals to reproduce.

It was once widely believed that Chlorella should serve as our main source of food and energy because of its highly efficient photosynthetic apparatus. When dried, it is about 45% protein, 20% fat, 20% carbohydrate, 5% fiber, and 10% vitamins and minerals. A Chlorella diet would supply all the essential amino acids. Thus it is a complete protein. However, later studies proved that Chlorella loses most of its nutritional value when altered or processed in any way.

Under certain growing conditions, Chlorella yields oils high in polyunsaturated fats -Chlorella minutissima has yielded EPA at 39.9% of total lipids.

Clinical studies on Chlorella suggest effects including: dioxin detoxification, healing from radiation exposure, reduction of high blood pressure, lower serum cholesterol levels, accelerated wound healing, and enhanced immune function. Chlorella has also been found to have anti-tumor properties when fed to mice. Another study found enhanced vascular function in hypertensive rats given oral doses of chlorella. In 1961 Melvin Calvin, a Nobel Prize laureate, used Chlorella for his research on the pathways of carbon dioxide assimilation. CCRES ALGAE TEAM

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Bioenergy: America’s Energy Future - YouTube

Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United St...
CCRES's insight:

 In smaller countries, like Croatia, where oil demand is low, and emission standards are poor, algae biofuel has the potential to significantly reduce reliance on foreign oil.
 All the best!
CCRES ALGAE TEAM

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Algae - YouTube

In this interview, Dr.Stephen Mayfield , Director of CAL-CAB discusses the future viability of algal based fuel sources.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Algenist Skincare: Biotechnology from San Francisco - YouTube

https://www.algenist.com - Biotechnology unlocking the Genius of Microalgae is at the foundation of Algenist's clinical skincare expertise delivering anti-ag...
CCRES's insight:

Microalgae is at the foundation of Algenist’s clinical skincare expertise delivering anti-aging treatments to maintain youthful, beautiful skin. Solazyme’s 10 years of algal research has led to the discovery of two compounds – Alguronic Acid and Microalgae Oil – forming the basis of this product line. Today, Algenist is positioned to be a global leader in clinical skincare. Here’s the story. CCRES ALGAE TEAM

more...
Alan Marson's curator insight, September 3, 2014 5:44 PM

Investment in of the production of microalgae is reaps more and more rewards 

Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Algae: The New Antibiotic? - Modern Farmer

Algae: The New Antibiotic? - Modern Farmer | Algae | Scoop.it
A Michigan startup is harnessing it as a feed additive to address the pervasive problem of unnecessary antibiotics use on healthy animals in factory farms.
CCRES's insight:

To the average observer, algae may look like a slimy mess. But in the green-tech world, they’re versatile workhorses that can be converted to biofuels, air purifiers and electricity.

#CCRES #ALGAE TEAM

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Farm Based Algae Production - YouTube

The University of Queensland has established an Algae Energy Farm to cultivate and harvest microalgae for a range of uses, including as a feed supplement for...
CCRES's insight:

Farm Based Algae Production

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

CCRES Project : Giving to Your Community

CCRES's insight:

Benefits of Antioxidants
‪#‎Antioxidants‬ come up frequently in discussions about good health and preventing diseases. These powerful substances, which mostly come from the fresh fruits and vegetables we eat, prohibit (and in some cases even prevent), the oxidation of other molecules in the body. The benefits of antioxidants are very important to good health, because if free radicals are left unchallenged, they can cause a wide range of illnesses and chronic diseases.

Antioxidants and Free Radicals
The human body naturally produces free radicals and the antioxidants to counteract their damaging effects. However, in most cases, free radicals far outnumber the naturally occurring antioxidants. In order to maintain the balance, a continual supply of external sources of antioxidants is necessary in order to obtain the maximum benefits of antioxidants. Antioxidants benefit the body by neutralizing and removing the free radicals from the bloodstream.

Different Antioxidants Benefit Different Parts of the Body
There are a wide range of antioxidants found in nature, and because they are so varied, different antioxidants provide benefits to different parts of the body. For example, beta-carotene (and other carotenoids) is very beneficial to eye health; lycopene is beneficial for helping maintain prostate health; flavonoids are especially beneficial for heart health; and proanthocyanidins are beneficial for urinary tract health.

Antioxidants and Skin Health Benefits
When skin is exposed to high levels of ultraviolet light, photo-oxidative damage is induced by the formation of different types of reactive species of oxygen, including singlet oxygen, superoxide radicals, and peroxide radicals. These forms of reactive oxygen damage cellular ‪#‎lipids‬, ‪#‎proteins‬, and DNA, and they are considered to be the primary contributors to erythema (sunburn), premature aging of the skin, photodermatoses, and skin cancers. 

Astaxanthin, followed by beta-carotene combined with vitamin E has been shown to be one of the most powerful antioxidant combinations for helping protect the skin from reactive species of oxygen.

Antioxidants and Immune System Support
Singlet oxygen can compromise the immune system, because it has the ability to catalyze production of free radicals. Astaxanthin and Spirulina have been shown to enhance both the non-specific and specific immune system, and to protect cell membranes and cellular ‪#‎DNA‬ from mutation. Astaxanthin is the single most powerful quencher of singlet oxygen, and is up to ten times stronger than other carotenoids (including beta-carotene), and up to 500 times stronger than alpha tocopherol (Vitamin E), while‪#‎Spirulina‬ has a variety of antioxidants and other substances that are beneficial in boosting immunity. 

Additional Ways Antioxidants Help Benefit One's Health
Increasing one's antioxidant intake is essential for optimum health, especially in today's polluted world. Because the body just can't keep up with antioxidant production, a good amount of these vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and enzymes must come from one's daily diet. Boosting your antioxidant intake can help provide added protection for the body against:

• Heart problems
• Eye problems
• Memory problems
• Mood disorders
• Immune system problems

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Algal open race-way ponds at 10°F (-12°C) - YouTube

The lowest temperature was 10°F (-12°C) at Greensboro, NC during last 5 days. A covered microalgal system or green house is necessary.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Biofuel Opportunity: Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead

Biofuel Opportunity: Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead | Algae | Scoop.it
Tucked away in darkness and almost dead, algae can emerge from a frigid and foggy environment to live again — and perhaps even become the seeds for a new beginning that can provide biofuel for a clean energy future.
CCRES's insight:

“The ongoing support from the private investment community speaks to how strongly they believe in the development of Green Crude as an alternative fuel resource, especially ability to commercialize it,” says Branka Kalle, President of Council CCRES

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

CCRES ENERGY EFFICIENCY COALITION

CCRES ENERGY EFFICIENCY COALITION | Algae | Scoop.it
CCRES ENERGY EFFICIENCY COALITION, by CCRES : Daily Renewable Energy News
CCRES's insight:
TechnologyAeroFarms Plans to Grow 1.5 Million Pounds of Leafy Greens
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by CCRES from Algae
Scoop.it!

CCRES algae team

CCRES algae team | Algae | Scoop.it

Via CCRES
CCRES's insight:

http://solarserdar.blogspot.com/2014/10/palmaria-palmata-fights-ebola.html

more...
CCRES's curator insight, September 2, 2014 3:15 PM

At present, most #astaxanthin is chemically synthesized, costs up to US$7,500 per kilogram, and is only suitable for adding to animal feed, rather than for human consumption, but astaxanthin from the #microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis, the richest known natural source of astaxanthin has the potential to expand for large-scale production said Zeljko Serdar, project leader of #CCRES algae team.

CCRES's curator insight, September 25, 2014 3:32 AM

"Convert waste problems to energy opportunities."

CCRES ALGAE TEAM

Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

CCRES algae team

CCRES algae team | Algae | Scoop.it
CCRES's insight:

At present, most #astaxanthin is chemically synthesized, costs up to US$7,500 per kilogram, and is only suitable for adding to animal feed, rather than for human consumption, but astaxanthin from the #microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis, the richest known natural source of astaxanthin has the potential to expand for large-scale production said Zeljko Serdar, project leader of #CCRES algae team.

more...
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

Leaving Facebook...

CCRES's insight:

Dietary supplements are often used to improve the nutritional status of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV). Arthrospira platensis (Asp), also known as Spirulina, is a cyanobacterium rich in proteins and micronutrients. Cell and animal trials described immune-modulating, antiretroviral and antioxidant activities. This pilot study describes the effects of the supplementation of 5 g/day of Asp on a pre-highly-active antiretroviral therapy (pre-HAART), HIV-infected, adult female population. CCRES ALGAE TEAM

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CCRES
Scoop.it!

AS Microscopic algae against cancer: the challenge of Andalusian scientists to create new drugs - YouTube

More videos at http://www.andalusianstories.com The Marine Microalgae Biotechnology Group of the University of Almería has developed a cultivation system tha...
CCRES's insight:

The Marine Microalgae Biotechnology Group of the University of Almería has developed a cultivation system that permits increased production of dinoflagellates, a type of microalgae with therapeutical properties. The researchers say it is the first step for their future use in the pharmaceutical industry, as these microalgae have anticarcinogenic and analgesic properties that would be useful in the creation of new drugs. CCRES ALGAE TEAM

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by CCRES from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Microalgae-based biofuel can help to meet world energy demand, researchers say

Microalgae-based biofuel can help to meet world energy demand, researchers say | Algae | Scoop.it

Microalgae-based biofuel not only has the potential to quench a sizable chunk of the world's energy demands, say Utah State University researchers. It's a potential game-changer.

 

"That's because microalgae produces much higher yields of fuel-producing biomass than other traditional fuel feedstocks and it doesn't compete with food crops," says USU mechanical engineering graduate student Jeff Moody.

 

With USU colleagues Chris McGinty and Jason Quinn, Moody published findings from an unprecedented worldwide microalgae productivity assessment in the May 26, 2014 Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The team's research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

 

Despite its promise as a biofuel source, the USU investigators questioned whether "pond scum" could be a silver bullet-solution to challenges posed by fossil fuel dependence.

 

"Our aim wasn't to debunk existing literature, but to produce a more exhaustive, accurate and realistic assessment of the current global yield of microalgae biomass and lipids," Moody says.

 

With Quinn, assistant professor in USU's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and McGinty, associate director of USU's Remote Sensing/Geographic Information Systems Laboratory in the Department of Wildland Resources, Moody leveraged a large-scale, outdoor microalgae growth model. Using meteorological data from 4,388 global locations, the team determined the current global productivity potential of microalgae.

 

Algae, he says, yields about 2,500 gallons of biofuel per acre per year. In contrast, soybeans yield approximately 48 gallons; corn about 18 gallons.


"In addition, soybeans and corn require arable land that detracts from food production," Quinn says. "Microalgae can be produced in non-arable areas unsuitable for agriculture."

 

The researchers estimate untillable land in Brazil, Canada, China and the U.S. could be used to produce enough algal biofuel to supplement more than 30 percent of those countries' fuel consumption.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
CCRES's insight:

Microalgae-based biofuel not only has the potential to quench a sizable chunk of the world's energy demands, say Utah State University researchers. It's a potential game-changer.

CCRES ALGAE TEAM

more...
Tekrighter's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:30 AM

Here's a way to produce biofuels that does not compete with food production.

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, May 29, 2014 8:52 PM

Land that is not used for food can be used to produce algae-based biofuel to meet a large fraction of the world's energy needs.  But another alternative is vertical farming in urban areas, where we can create as much space as we need.  

Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, May 30, 2014 2:50 AM

This study highlights the commercial viability of algae biofuels.


The game changing aspect of the technology is that it does not contribute to food insecurity http://sco.lt/5CifIH, a global issue aggravated by climate change http://sco.lt/86HUtl.


However, would we garner enough political will to wrest monopoly from oil and gas companies?