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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture,CCRES


Via Seth Dixon
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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 2:13 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Algae biofuels: the wave of the future

Algae biofuels: the wave of the future | Algae | Scoop.it
Researchers at Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have assembled the draft genome of a marine algae sequence to aid scientists across the US in a project that aims to discover the best algae species for producing biodiesel fuel.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built...

Urban Sustainability: The cities of the future will be grown, not built... | Algae | Scoop.it

 

At DLD Cities in London, he said "cities have centers that celebrate previous centuries -- in Europe, the cities celebrated spirituality, with cathedrals. After some time, the cathedrals became downtown cores- and celebrations of capitalism and commercialism".

The cities of the future will celebrate "the belief of what keeps us alive" - or elements of the city that make our lives better.

 

Terreform ONE, a green design company in Brooklyn, explores biohacks for the ecological issues facing modern cities. For instance, the waste New York City produces every hour weighs as much as the Statue of Liberty - in the future that waste could be recompacted into building blocks, or recycled "bales". Looking beyond recycling, though, it would be even better to create a city which didn't produce waste in the first place...

That means growing thousands of homes -- building a new suburb could involve twisting, pruning and manipulating large trees into the frames of buildings. "There would be no difference between the home and nature -- it would be something that would be a positive addition to the ecology," explained Joachim.

 

For more information on these innovative concepts, including biomimicry and new green technology proposals for future cities, stop by to read the complete article and visit referenced links on urban sustainability...


Via Lauren Moss, Rowan Edwards, Kalani Kirk Hausman
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