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ALDA E-Newsletter Editorial

ALDA E-Newsletter Editorial | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it

Welcome to our Australian Learning Disability Association (ALDA) E-Newsletter.

 

President's Report

 

 

 

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Are gifted children getting lost in the shuffle?

Are gifted children getting lost in the shuffle? | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
Gifted children are likely to be the next generation's innovators and leaders—and yet, the exceptionally smart are often invisible in the classroom, lacking the curricula, teacher input and external motivation to reach full potential.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, January 8, 2014 2:58 PM

This comes as no surprise to those of us in the educational world who are concerned with the failure of our schools to address the needs of students of every intellectual stripe. We should read this with an eye toward developing appropriate programs for all kinds of learners particularly our twice exceptional learners who possess great intellectual power and curiosity and are hampered by learning differences like dyslexia.--Lou

Excerpt:

"This conclusion comes as the result of the largest scientific study of the profoundly gifted to date, a 30-year study conducted by researchers at Vanderbilt University's Peabody College of education and human development.

David Lubinski, professor of psychology and human development at Peabody, led the study, which tracked 300 gifted children from age 13 until age 38, logging their accomplishments in academia, business, culture, health care, science and technology. The results were recently published in a paper titled "Who Rises to the Top? Early Indicators," in Psychological Science.

"Gifted children are a precious human-capital resource," said Lubinski, who has spent four decades studying talented individuals to correlate exceptional early SAT scores with achievement later in life. "This population represents future creators of modern culture and leaders in business, health care, law, the professoriate and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Our study provides new insight into the potential of gifted children."

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What Extra Time Gives a Dyslexic: A Firsthand Look by Allison Schwartz * The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity

What Extra Time Gives a Dyslexic: A Firsthand Look  by Allison Schwartz * The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it

Extra time wasn’t the entire solution, but with it, I saw my confidence improve, and with that, so did my schoolwork.


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, September 27, 2013 2:11 PM

It is still an issue out there--some believe that allowing extra time to a dyslexic creates an unfair advantage over other students. This poignant story helps to explain how important the extra time is (in Nightmare scenario #2!)  

Recently a close colleague who is an avid and dedicated runner explained the concept of extra time this way: If you can run a marathon in 3 hours, you have a certain expectation of exertion and effort. A person who runs a 3hr marathon does not want or need' extra time'. In fact running a 5 hour pace would be extremely taxing to that 3 hour athlete.  On the other hand someone who runs a 5 hour pace will probably not be able to run significantly faster and needs the time to complete the challenge of the marathon. Both run the same distance. One exerts themselves longer and harder!

 

Share with teachers who worry about the "fairness" issue!--

 

 

Excerpt:

"This nightmare might sound familiar to you:

You walk into an exam. You sit down. You stare at the sheets of paper in front of you as you listen to people scribble answers to questions that you yourself have no idea how to answer. You can hear the clock ticking away. When it seems like an eternity has passed, the teacher calls time. You hand in a piece of paper that may not be completely blank, but might as well be. The panic sets in. You can awake from this nightmare knowing that next time you will be prepared and you will be able to answer the questions. We’ll call this Nightmare Scenario Number 1.

Now imagine walking into an exam, knowing all the answers, but cognizant that you’ll never complete it in time. Rather than spend time answering the questions, you try to strategize about which questions you can answer the fastest, rereading each question a few times. In this scenario, which we’ll call “Nightmare Scenario Number 2,” you’re also dyslexic. So, not only do you have to decode the symbols on the page, you also have to work through the nerves you have from knowing that you have all this extra work to do while taking the test, but not the extra time. Since you’re not a professional spy, who is trained to decode under pressure, you take a little longer than usual to translate the words on the page. By the time you have figured out the questions you can answer the fastest, you have about half the time left. Even though you know the answers to more than half the questions on the test, you only have time to answer some of the questions. You leave feeling frustrated. You studied as hard as anyone else—probably harder—and you start to realize that no amount of studying can prepare you. You could have memorized the entire textbook. But you will never have enough time to translate your knowledge into coherent answers. Now imagine Nightmare Scenario Number 2 repeating, again and again.

You can see how no amount of extra time on tests solves the problems in Nightmare Scenario Number 1. If you don’t know the material, you can’t answer the questions, no matter how much time you have. But the problem is that often educators, students, and testing agencies don’t even consider that extra time might be a solution to Nightmare Scenario Number 2....

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E-readers may help dyslexics read more easily - Today.com (blog)

E-readers may help dyslexics read more easily - Today.com (blog) | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
E-readers may help dyslexics read more easily
Today.com (blog)
What's not clear is whether the new reading method is helping with the dyslexia or with ADD, which often co-exists with the learning disability.
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Dyslexia counted as disability under Better Schools plan - Sydney Morning Herald

Dyslexia counted as disability under Better Schools plan - Sydney Morning Herald | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald Dyslexia counted as disability under Better Schools plan Sydney Morning Herald Students with dyslexia and other learning difficulties will be identified as having a disability under the federal school funding reforms, paving...
ALDA's insight:

Great news but hopefully just the beginning!

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Tracking Dyslexia In The Preschool Brain @TuftsGSAS @MaryanneWolf_

Tracking Dyslexia In The Preschool Brain @TuftsGSAS  @MaryanneWolf_ | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it

Maryanne Wolf, director of the Center for Reading and Language Research at Tufts University, described the work as “amazing.”

“It shows that this brain is differently organized for written language before reading ever occurs,” she said via e-mail. “It is like a missing piece in our understanding of dyslexia.”

Identifying the signs of dyslexia in the brain helps destigmatize the condition, said Wolf, author of “Proust and the Squid: the Story and Science of the Reading Brain.”

“One of the problems in dyslexia is people are saying it doesn’t exist,” she said. “When you look at these brain images you know it exists.”

Wolf said she’s optimistic that dyslexia will eventually be diagnosed before a child falls too far behind. In the meantime, she said, teachers should be better trained in how to identify dyslexia and how to help children who are struggling to read.

“We have to get our professional develop commensurate with our knowledge base,” she said.

 


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, August 17, 2013 7:39 PM

When Professor Maryanne Wolf speaks; I listen!-Lou

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Dyslexia 'Seen' In Brain Scans Of Kindergartners: Earlier Learning ... - Medical Daily

Dyslexia 'Seen' In Brain Scans Of Kindergartners: Earlier Learning ... - Medical Daily | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
Medical Daily
Dyslexia 'Seen' In Brain Scans Of Kindergartners: Earlier Learning ...
ALDA's insight:

Interesting But only part of the puzzle.

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TY! @cdcowen for: Visual System Differences in Dyslexia Do Not Cause Reading Problems

TY! @cdcowen for: Visual System Differences in Dyslexia Do Not Cause Reading Problems | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it

"One by one, science is resolving mysteries, settling disputes, and challenging assumptions surrounding dyslexia, while delving ever deeper into its complexities. The last two decades have produced a remarkable body of work, including the breakthrough findings from Georgetown University mentioned in this article. Examiner readers and those who follow dyslexia-related issues via social media have unprecedented, almost real-time access to this exciting research as it unfolds.

The challenge, of course, is to translate this body of work into effective practices and policies that actually make a difference in the lives of people with dyslexia. In this regard, the work of The International Dyslexia Association (IDA) is more important than ever. IDA is dedicated to both the study and treatment of dyslexia and related difficulties learning to read and write...." 


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, July 22, 2013 3:25 PM

Carolyn writes for the IDA Examiner. I highly recommend you read her blogs and follow her. She gets this exactly right: the challenge to us all is to determine how we get research like this into the classrooms, clinics and education classes and into  pre- and in- service teacher preparation curriculum. --Lou

Excerpt:

 

By Carolyn D. Cowen

" The jury is in on yet another long-standing debate about dyslexia. The verdict is important and nuanced.

The phonological basis for dyslexia’s hallmark difficulties in learning to read has been established for decades as the predominant explanation of dyslexia. Nevertheless, another explanation—a weakness in processing visual stimuli—has persisted and remains a subject of debate. Now, a new study provides strong evidence about the role of the brain’s visual system in dyslexia.

This study, published on line June 6 in the journal, Neuron, found that while a specific difference can be seen in the brain’s visual system in subjects with dyslexia, this difference is not the culprit behind the reading difficulties. More likely, this difference is the consequence of less reading experience. And, to paraphrase Shakespeare, saying that children with dyslexia have less reading experience than their peers is like saying that night follows day. 

This breakthrough study found that, yes, people with dyslexia do have subtle visual system differences—as many of those with dyslexia and their teachers have long reported—but, no, these visual differences do not cause the condition and its associated reading difficulties. In fact, the findings suggest, it may be the other way around; reading difficulties discourage reading, which in turn, probably means that children with dyslexia do not experience the same “reading-induced change in the visual system” that is seen in typical readers.

You may be wondering what this means for intervention. Hold that thought while we dig deeper into the research.

Controlling for Reading Experience: Visual System Differences Not Seen

Researchers used functional brain imaging to show less activity in the “magnocellular” visual system in children with dyslexia compared to non-dyslexic children matched on age. However, this difference no longer was seen when children with dyslexia were compared to younger, non-dyslexics matched on reading ability, suggesting that the observed difference might be tied to reading level. Georgetown University, where the study was conducted, provided a press releasethat sheds additional light on the findings:

“Our results do not discount the presence of this specific type of visual deficit,” says senior authorGuinevere Eden, Ph.D., director for theCenter for the Study of Learning atGeorgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) and past-president ofThe International Dyslexia Association. “In fact, our results confirm that differences do exist in the visual system of children with dyslexia, but these differences are the end-product of less reading, when compared with typical readers, and are not the cause of their struggles with reading.”

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Yale study could lead to early dyslexia diagnosis | WTNH.com Connecticut

Yale study could lead to early dyslexia diagnosis | WTNH.com Connecticut | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
A Yale study on dyslexia could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective intervention.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, June 29, 2013 2:24 PM

If only early diagnosis guaranteed early effective instruction or intervention!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"..NEW HAVEN, Conn. (WTNH) -- A Yale study on dyslexia could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective intervention. 

Teachers typically are the first to recognize a child is having a tough time reading, spelling, reading aloud and understanding what is being said.

"This is a map of the human genome," said Dr. Jeffrey Gruen, Yale School of Medicine.

Now, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have identified two genes, that together, increase the risk for dyslexia and language disabilities.

"This is the second dyslexia risk gene," said Dr. Gruen. "It has a huge effect for risk of dyslexia, that can actually increase the risk for dyslexia almost 8 fold in the general population."

What Dr. Gruen and his research unit have pinpointed could lead to an even earlier diagnosis of kids with dyslexia and impaired language skills..."
 

Kirsten Wilson's curator insight, June 29, 2013 9:28 PM

Very interested in where this may go ahow how it will change the face of identification.

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Explanation: How Brain Training Can Make You Significantly Smarter

Explanation: How Brain Training Can Make You Significantly Smarter | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
As many people hit middle age, they often start to notice that their memory and mental clarity are not what they used to be.  We suddenly can’t remember where we put the keys just a moment ago, or an old acquaintance’s name, or the name of an old...
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Vision, dyslexia not linked

Vision, dyslexia not linked | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
RT @Evie_cc: Even more evidence in favour of synthetic phonics based intervention http://t.co/PMk8nwgLNW
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Brain imaging study eliminates differences in visual function as a cause of dyslexia | Science Codex

Brain imaging study eliminates differences in visual function as a cause of dyslexia | Science Codex | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON — A new brain imaging study of dyslexia shows that differences in the visual system do not cause the disorder, but instead are likely a consequence.
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Study Links Dyslexia to Visual Attention Problems in Preschool

Study Links Dyslexia to Visual Attention Problems in Preschool | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
Researchers find link with pre-readers' visual understanding of symbols, patterns (Study Links Dyslexia to Visual Attention Problems in Preschool http://t.co/7QvkdCCLBR via @educationweek)...
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In dyslexia, less brain tissue not to blame for reading difficulties

In dyslexia, less brain tissue not to blame for reading difficulties | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
In people with dyslexia, less gray matter in the brain has been linked to reading disabilities, but now new evidence suggests this is a consequence of poorer reading experiences and not the root cause of the disorder.

Via Karen P. Kelly
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@anniemurphypaul Do you know these smart learning strategies?

@anniemurphypaul Do you know these smart learning strategies? | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it

".....anytime a student learns, he or she has to bring in two kinds of prior knowledge: knowledge about the subject at hand (say, mathematics or history) and knowledge about how learning works. Parents and educators are pretty good at imparting the first kind of knowledge. We’re comfortable talking about concrete information: names, dates, numbers, facts. But the guidance we offer on the act of learning itself—the “metacognitive” aspects of learning—is more hit-or-miss, and it shows....."


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:05 AM

This is so important especially for students who struggle with dyslexia or ADHD.  ----Lou

Excerpt:

"...In our schools, "the emphasis is on what students need to learn, whereas little emphasis—if any—is placed on training students how they should go about learning the content and what skills will promote efficient studying to support robust learning," writes John Dunlosky, professor of psychology at Kent State University in Ohio, in an article just published in American Educator. However, he continues, "teaching students how to learn is as important as teaching them content, because acquiring both the right learning strategies and background knowledge is important—if not essential—for promoting lifelong learning..."

n their own study, Askell-Williams and her coauthors took as their subjects 1,388 Australian high school students. They first administered an assessment to find out how much the students knew about cognitive and metacognitive learning strategies—and found that their familiarity with these tactics was “less than optimal....”

"...Students can assess their own awareness by asking themselves which of the following learning strategies they regularly use (the response to each item is ideally “yes”):
• I draw pictures or diagrams to help me understand this subject.
• I make up questions that I try to answer about this subject.
• When I am learning something new in this subject, I think back to what I already know about it.
• I discuss what I am doing in this subject with others.
• I practice things over and over until I know them well in this subject.
• I think about my thinking, to check if I understand the ideas in this subject.
• When I don’t understand something in this subject I go back over it again.
• I make a note of things that I don’t understand very well in this subject, so that I can follow them up.
• When I have finished an activity in this subject I look back to see how well I did.
• I organize my time to manage my learning in this subject.
• I make plans for how to do the activities in this subject.

Askell-Williams and her colleagues found that those students who used fewer of these strategies reported more difficulty coping with their schoolwork...."

Say Keng Lee's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:51 AM

According to the research, ''It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know.''

 

The latter is known as ''metacognition'', which is illustrated in the article.

Laura Perez's curator insight, October 16, 2013 6:31 AM

Estrategias que han de estar en la mochila de cualquier docente :)

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Dyslexia Insight #1: Make Dyslexia About Strengths—Not Shame - NCLD

Dyslexia Insight #1: Make Dyslexia About Strengths—Not Shame - NCLD | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
Dyslexia and shame: Why do dyslexic people feel shame about their difficulties with reading and spelling? Dyslexic author Ben Foss shares his experience.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, August 14, 2013 12:30 PM

This is a wonderful piece! Share it with your students!-Lou


"Let me introduce myself: My name is Ben Foss, and I am dyslexic.

When I was a kid, my mother read out loud to me. When I went to college, I’d fax my term papers home to her in New Hampshire so she could read them to me over the phone and help me find spelling mistakes. I know what it's like to feel lonely, and I want to tell dyslexic people—especially dyslexic kids and their parents—that you’re not alone. I’m collaborating with NCLD over the next few weeks to share some of the insights I’ve gained on my path from special education to completing my law and business degrees at Stanford, and eventually becoming the Director of Access Technology at Intel. I’ll be sharing insights that I hope will help you learn the facts about dyslexia, tell your story and build a toolkit that will allow anyone with dyslexia play to his or her strengths."

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Support worry for failing WA kids - The Australian

Support worry for failing WA kids - The Australian | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
Support worry for failing WA kids
The Australian
Dyscalculia, referring to a range of life-long learning disabilities involving maths. - Dysgraphia, a specific learning disability that affects written expression.
ALDA's insight:

In other parts of the world dyslexia is considered to be a civil rights issue but in Australia the sufferer is to blame In particular in our schools.

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Review: The Dyslexia Empowerment Plan: A Blueprint for Renewing Your Child’s Confidence and Love of Learning by Ben Foss. Ballantine, $27 (336p) ISBN 978-0-345-54123-9

Review: The Dyslexia Empowerment Plan: A Blueprint for Renewing Your Child’s Confidence and Love of Learning by Ben Foss. Ballantine, $27  (336p) ISBN 978-0-345-54123-9 | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it

"In a passionate and well-articulated guide that puts to rest the idea that dyslexic people are unintelligent, disabilities advocate Foss (himself dyslexic and the creator of Intel Reader, a text-to-speech device) describes dyslexia as a characteristic and a disability that should be accommodated in the same way as blindness or mobility issues. Foss reframes the use of film, audiobooks, and material read aloud as “ear-reading,” in contrast to the “eye-reading” that is the educational standard."


Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, August 19, 2013 11:51 PM

This is an excellent guide for parents and professionals.- Lou


Excerpt:

" Though, as Foss notes, eye-reading is a useful skill that can be improved by teaching methods like Orton-Gillingham, by mid-elementary school, dyslexic students should be accommodated with auditory materials. He hopes that parents can learn to explain their child’s needs in a way that will win them essential support, and that they can help their child build self-esteem. Foss describes the current state of assistive technology and highlights the availability of material from resources like Learning Ally; he also discusses how to navigate good accommodations in the school environment and determine if a school is inappropriate for your child’s welfare. This extremely practical and motivational book will be welcomed by parents of dyslexic children. "

Lola Jennings- Edquist's curator insight, August 20, 2013 6:23 AM

Yay! Helping people with disabilities. So important. 

 My sister and best friend both have dyslexia, and both felt extremely unsupported by teachers and peers throughout childhood because of it. Even now, both still hold some sense of self-consciousness about their intelligence- despite being two of the smartest people I know. 

Resources like this are very important for teachers and parents. 

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Researchers Debunk Myth of“Right-Brained” and “Left-Brained” Personality Traits

Researchers Debunk Myth of“Right-Brained” and “Left-Brained” Personality Traits | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
New neuroimaging research suggests there is no evidence to indicate "right-brained" or "left-brained" personality traits exist.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, August 15, 2013 1:26 PM

What we associate with 'left ' or 'right' brained may indeed have some common personality traits, but these are not apparently mirrored  in measurable brain activity:

"we just don’t see patterns where the whole left-brain network is more connected or the whole right-brain network is more connected in some people. It may be that personality types have nothing to do with one hemisphere being more active, stronger, or more connected,” said Nielsen."  


So let's beware of inappropriate generalization--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"...During the course of the study, researchers analyzed resting brain scans of 1,011 people between the ages of seven and 29. In each person, they studied functional lateralization of the brain measured for thousands of brain regions —finding no relationship that individuals preferentially use their left -brain network or right- brain network more often.

“It’s absolutely true that some brain functions occur in one or the other side of the brain. Language tends to be on the left, attention more on the right. But people don’t tend to have a stronger left- or right-sided brain network. It seems to be determined more connection by connection, ” said Jeff Anderson, M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the study, which is formally titled “An Evaluation of the Left-Brain vs. Right-Brain Hypothesis with Resting State Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging.” It is published in the journal PLOS ONE this month..."

Linda Alexander's comment, August 16, 2013 12:35 AM
Hah! I've been thinking about this left/right mindset for a number of years, so very glad to have this article. We know so much from TBI (traumatic brain injuries) that the brain is much more complex, integrated and malleable than this age-old generalization.
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The Dyslexic Advantage: Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain: Brock&Fernette Eide

The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain

~ Fernette F. Eide M.D. (author) More about this product
List Price: $16.00
Price: $12.19
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The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain [Brock L. Eide M.D. M.A., Fernette F. Eide M.D.] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, August 3, 2013 10:50 AM

I recommend this book to parents, teachers, legislators and  leaders: It is important that we start to shift our view point from what isn't working with dyslexic kids to what works well. For too long we have tried to make students with dyslexia fit into a school system that we now understand is antiquated and obsolete for all learners. Technology offers access to any child on any subject at any time. Let's quit making kids jump through the hoops we had to jump through to launch into their future.--Lou

 

Excerpt: "..The fundamental point of reading is to gain access to written information. Fortunately, with advances in technology that allow verbal information to be stored and transmitted in many ways, there’s no longer any reason why individuals with dyslexia should lack access to information of any kind. Civil rights advocate Ben Foss is a great example of how viewing dyslexic challenges as an issue of information access rather than as reading issues per se can lead to creative approaches at school and work. Ben is currently executive director of Disability Rights Advocates, a national civil rights organization that seeks equality and opportunity for people with disabilities. But until recently he worked as director of access technology at Intel’s Digital Health Group, where he supervised the development of assistive technologies for individuals 

with disabilities. Ben’s final project was the Intel Reader, a portable device small enough to carry in a purse or backpack that combines a digital camera with a text-to-speech reader. It can be used to read aloud, at up to five times normal speed, any kind of printed text that’s in a location where it can be digitally photographed—whether from books, magazines, package labels, or signs on walls. The idea for the Intel Reader first started with Ben, and his team ultimately received two U.S. patents for technology related to its design...."

Kindle eition Loc: 2645

Eide M.D. M.A., Brock L.; M.D., Fernette F. Eide (2011-08-18). The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain (p. 182). Penguin Group US. Kindle Edition.

Eide M.D. M.A., Brock L.; M.D., Fernette F. Eide (2011-08-18). The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain (Kindle Locations 2646-2652). Penguin Group US. Kindle Edition.

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Learning Disabilities Linked to Slow Brain Development - The Almagest

Learning Disabilities Linked to Slow Brain Development - The Almagest | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
The Almagest Learning Disabilities Linked to Slow Brain Development The Almagest Researchers from Northwestern University, Illinois studied 54 children and adults who had been diagnosed with one of three learning problems (dyslexia, specific...

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Looking Differently at Dyslexia

Looking Differently at Dyslexia | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
Dyslexia is traditionally thought of as a problem that needs solving. But maybe it's a valuable asset instead - a different way of seeing the world which brings business benefits with it. (Looking Differently at Dyslexia...
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NYT David Brooks: Beyond the Brain

NYT David Brooks: Beyond the Brain | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it

"....The next time somebody tells you what a brain scan says, be a little skeptical. The brain is not the mind...."Advances in neuroscience promise many things, but they will never explain everything."


Via Lou Salza
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Linda Alexander's comment, June 18, 2013 8:04 AM
Three cheers for David Brooks! We want to divide, map and conquer the brain. And then there is the mind--a whole different element altogether. I'm tired of the brain-scans, too, Lou. Misinformation is being applied in too many classrooms, and in society. Thanks for posting! The brain is fluid, extremely complex and, as Brooks points out, does not speak for the mind.
Linda Alexander's curator insight, June 18, 2013 8:05 AM

Three cheers for David Brooks (again). An important article for teachers, administrators, and society in general!

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 18, 2013 1:42 PM

A good word of caution: that new studies and insights are unlikely to explain everything.  And despite some of the comments after this article, the idea that the mind IS the brain is at best still very controversial. -Lon

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Brain imaging study eliminates differences in visual function as a cause of dyslexia

Brain imaging study eliminates differences in visual function as a cause of dyslexia | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
A new brain imaging study of dyslexia shows that visual system differences do not cause the disorder, but instead are likely a consequence.
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Can alternative fonts improve learning for students with dyslexia?

Can alternative fonts improve learning for students with dyslexia? | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
The use of more challenging fonts may help all students retain information, but it may be especially helpful for students with learning disabilities, according (Can alternative fonts improve learning for students with dyslexia?
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Teaching dyslexic children: spotting the signs and supporting your students

Teaching dyslexic children: spotting the signs and supporting your students | ALDA E-Newsletter | Scoop.it
With many teachers not trained to spot dyslexia, Sally Bouwman shares her advice for detecting the disorder (Teaching dyslexic children: spotting the signs - With many teachers not trained to spot dyslexia, Sally Bouwman sh...
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