Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones
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Remembering the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery | The Christian Century

Remembering the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery | The Christian Century | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
In 1965, MLK asked religious leaders to come to Selma and march. Decades later, plans are taking shape in Montgomery to honor those who came.

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George Washington Carver

Video about the life of George Washington Carver.

 

The Field Museum


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Montgomery Bus Boycott: The story of Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights Movement

A site about Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott


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Plazmapkmn's curator insight, February 27, 2013 9:47 AM

Good resources for my project

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Tuskegee Confederate Monument - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Tuskegee Confederate Monument - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
Monument erected in 1906 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in memory of Confederate soldiers from Macon County. Scene of 1960s civil rights activities.

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Harris Barrett School - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Harris Barrett School - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
Built in 1903 by students of the Tuskegee Normal School, later named Tuskegee Institute and now Tuskegee University. The students made the bricks by hand and built the two room school under the directions of Dr. Booker T. Washington. It was constructed for the descendants of slaves. Located on three acres of land and restored to its originality, today it is a developing historic museum that tells the story of early school life and living in rural Alabama. The school houses the exposition of local African Americans education and achievements from the slave ships to the space ships, highlighting those of Tuskegee Univertity who help develop the NASA project of growing food in space. Tours daily by request.

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What Scalia really has against the Voting Rights Act

What Scalia really has against the Voting Rights Act | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it

by DAVID HORSEY (Baltimore Sun)

 

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is alleged to be one of the great intellects of conservative jurisprudence, but his comments during oral arguments over a challenge to the 1965 Voting Rights Act displayed all the mental acuity of a third-tier talk radio bozo.

 

Shelby County, Ala., is making the case against the voting law. Section 5 of the act empowers the federal government to negate new local and state voting rules if they would lead to discrimination against minority voters. It has been enforced primarily in Southern states that had a long, dismal history of preventing African Americans from voting. Shelby County contends the problem has been remedied and so Section 5 is no longer justified.

 

Georgia's U.S. Rep. John Lewis begs to differ. Lewis was severely beaten in Selma, Ala., during the 1965 "Bloody Sunday" police riot directed against peaceful civil rights marchers. The horror of that scene as it played out on America's television screens led directly to congressional approval of the Voting Rights Act.  MORE

 


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Greg Russak's curator insight, March 5, 2013 9:47 PM

"The right to vote is the core of our constitutional democracy. It is not, as Justice Scalia says, "a racial entitlement," it is an American entitlement. It seems that might be a very useful thing for Congress to watch over and protect. It was eminently important in 1965 and remains important today." - David Horsey, Baltimore Sun

Nadine Hack's comment, March 6, 2013 3:09 AM
I hope the other members of the US Supreme Court will have the common sense to protect the Voting Rights Act!
Nadine Hack's curator insight, March 6, 2013 3:13 AM

I hope the other members of the US Supreme Court will have the common sense and decency to protect the Voting Rights Act!

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Dexter Parsonage Museum opens for tours on special day

Dexter Parsonage Museum opens for tours on special day | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
The Dexter Parsonage Museum opened on Monday in honor of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. It offered discounted rates, and attracted a good size crowd.

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Siblings of the bombing: Remembering Birmingham church blast 50 years on

Siblings of the bombing: Remembering Birmingham church blast 50 years on | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
Fifty years ago, four girls died in a Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church in a moment that would change a nation. Their surviving siblings have their own stories

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Civil Rights Memorial | Southern Poverty Law Center

Civil Rights Memorial | Southern Poverty Law Center | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it

The Civil Rights Memorial honors the achievements and memory of those who died during the Civil Rights Movement, a period framed by the momentous Brown v. Board decision in 1954 and the assassination of Dr.


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Ashley Nicole Kilgore's curator insight, January 17, 2014 3:27 PM

Civil Rights Memorial Center

Rescooped by Chase Jones from Selma to Montgomery Trail Interpretive Center
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March 7, 1965 | Civil Rights Marchers Attacked in Selma

March 7, 1965 | Civil Rights Marchers Attacked in Selma | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
On March 7, 1965, state troopers and a sheriff’s posse in Selma, Ala., attacked 525 civil rights demonstrators taking part in a march between Selma and Montgomery, the state capital.

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Text-Dependent Analysis in Action: Examples From Dr. MLK, Jr.'s Letter from a Birmingham Jail

• In-depth analysis and discussion of Dr. King's Letter from a Birmingham Jail • Explanation of the cognitive requirements of the Standards •  

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TODAY ALABAMA GIVES PROMOTION: SUPPORT THE TUSKEGEE HUMAN AND CIVIL RIGHTS MULTICULTURAL CENTER

TODAY ALABAMA GIVES PROMOTION: SUPPORT THE TUSKEGEE HUMAN AND CIVIL RIGHTS MULTICULTURAL CENTER | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
Help me support TUSKEGEE HUMAN AND CIVIL RIGHTS MULTICULTURAL CENTER on Razoo! Donate or click "Share" below to spread the word.

 

We share an incredible history of tragedy and triumph - from the tragic Tuskegee Syphilis Study to the heroic Tuskegee Airmen, inspirational stories of Native, European and African American history are presented in museum exhibits and programs. Featuring decades of documented history of non-violent action, Tuskegee, Alabama is one of America's best kept civil rights secrets. The Center presents Tuskegee and Macon County, Alabama's influence on cultural, political, legal, and social aspects of American life - past and present.

 

Read More and Donate.

 

http://algives.razoo.com/story/Tuskegee-Human-And-Civil-Rights-Multicultural-Center


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The Stand in the School House

"The Stand in the Schoolhouse Door took place at Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, in a symbolic attempt to keep his inaugural promise of "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" and stop the desegregation of schools, stood at the door of the auditorium to try to block the entry of two black students, Vivian Malone Jones and James Hood.[1]

The incident brought George Wallace into the national spotlight."


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ciara's curator insight, February 6, 2014 2:26 AM

On a scorching june day in 1963, James Hood and Vivian Malone became the first black students to enroll successfully at the university of alabama defying Governor George Wallace Jr.’s symbolic — and vitriolic — ‘‘stand in the schoolhouse door.’’ this is an eample of racial sergregation going on in the south of this time frame

De'Andre King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 9:54 PM

This stand created a very insecure statue between blacks and whites. I feel like the Governor showed a public display of sentiment and he had no right. As a political leader you should not verbally or physically take sides in community disputes, but aim to peacefully negotiate the result.

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Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site | National Parks Conservation Association

Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site | National Parks Conservation Association | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site tells the story of the first African Americans to train as U.S. Army pilots and ground support during World War II.

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We Shall Overcome -- Butler Chapel AME Zion Church

Photographs and description of the

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National Voting Rights Museum and Institute | Selma, Alabama

National Voting Rights Museum and Institute | Selma, Alabama | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
Located in the Historic District of Selma, Alabama at the foot of the famous Edmund Pettus Bridge, the scene of “Bloody Sunday,” the National Voting Rights Museum & Institute is the cornerstone of the contemporary struggle for voting rights and...

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Rosa Parks Library and Museum Dedication - C-SPAN Video Library

Rosa Parks Library and Museum Dedication - C-SPAN Video Library | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
Civil rights activists and other dignitaries spoke at the dedication of the Rosa Parks Library and Museum. The TSU Gospel Choir, directed by Stephen M.

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“Letter from Birmingham Jail” Historical Marker | C-SPAN

“Letter from Birmingham Jail” Historical Marker | C-SPAN | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
50 years ago, on April 16, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. wrote his “Letter from Birmingham Jail” while being held in prison for his involvement in a city-wide civil rights protest called the Birmingham Campaign.

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Viola Liuzzo Historic Marker - White Hall - Alabama.travel

Viola Liuzzo Historic Marker - White Hall - Alabama.travel | Alabama Civil Rights Movements PBL by Chase Jones | Scoop.it
Viola Gregg Liuzzo, a housewife and mother from Detroit, drove alone to Alabama to help with the Selma march after seeing televised reports of the attack at the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

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