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Al calor del Caribe
Entre lo ecléctico y lo entrópico. Un espacio híbrido donde el desorden es una forma de orden
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Rescooped by Minerva Bueno from SOCIAL MEDIA INTERACTION (bilingual)
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Visualize Your Data in the Age of Distraction For These 6 Reasons [Infographic]

Visualize Your Data in the Age of Distraction For These 6 Reasons [Infographic] | Al calor del Caribe | Scoop.it

This piece was posted by Loren Sorenson for Hubspot, I selected it because as she says "If you aren’t prepared for the visual content revolution, you may be left in the dust.

 

Not convinced? Let's take a look at exactly how visual contentis positively contributing to marketing strategies -- it may just give you the push you need

 

"Learn why visual content is a critical part of your content creation strategy.

 

Here are some highlights:

 

**People remember only 20% of what they read

 

**83% of learning is visual

 

Condenses and Explains Large Amounts of Information

 

**Today, there is too much information on the Internet you have about 3 seconds to catch someone’s eyes so they'll consume your information.

 

Gives Your Brand an Identity

 

**Visual content draws people in, letting viewers better understand your brand's identity

 

Drives User Engagement

 

**If you've ever read a book with a child, you probably know they find pictures more interesting than words; but are adults really that different?

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/Ifujbp]


Via janlgordon, Beth Kanter, Martin (Marty) Smith, Rose Marie DeSousa
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janlgordon's comment, April 11, 2012 3:21 PM
Beth Kanter
Thank you for adding me to the wiki and for your kind words, it's greatly appreciated. Yes this is the conversation of the moment so to speak. I'm sure your presentation was amazing. Would love to hear it if you have a replay.
Beth Kanter's comment, April 11, 2012 10:08 PM
Jan: There's a link in the wiki to the live stream of the session - and a lot of notes and resources ... I love this topic! I'm holding myself back from created another scoop.it on it ...
janlgordon's comment, April 13, 2012 10:05 PM
Beth Kanter
Thanks for looking forward to seeing this info. Knowing you, I can imagine that you want to start another scoopit on this topic but it's not necessary because you're already doing a wonderful job covering it now.
Rescooped by Minerva Bueno from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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The Fallacy of Information Overload | Brian Solis

The Fallacy of Information Overload | Brian Solis | Al calor del Caribe | Scoop.it

Excerpted from this article by Brian Solis:

 

"Information overload isn’t a new phenomenon by any means. The sensation of being overwhelmed by information has been linked to every media revolution. With every new innovation and the mass adoption of disruptive technology, the volume of information available to us grows exponentially.

 

With media now so pervasive and portable, information, of any focus, is available, on demand, and more importantly, resides in our hands to create and consume at will. We are, for better or for worse, always on. And this is both part of the problem and part of the solution for how we evolve as individuals and as an information society.

 

Social media has gifted us a new democracy. And with it, the ability to connect to people around the world and create, share, and devour knowledge, entrainment, and irrelevant information at will. It’s as intimidating as it is beautiful.

 

There is a very real human cost of social connectivity. But, the symptoms of information overload are only a reflection of our inability or lack of desire to bring order to our chaos. See, we are the engineers of the media levees that prevent overflow.

 

The challenge lies not in the realization that we are empowered to curate our social streams and relationships, but in the consciousness of what is and what could be. Meaning, that we must first understand that how we’re connecting, consuming, and creating today is either part of the problem or part of the solution. We, and only we, are in control of information overload and everything begins with acceptance.

 

Information overload is a real phenomenon, but it is I believe, by design. It either works for us or against us and it is our choice as to which way the stream flows. To be clear, information overload is a symptom of over consumption and the inability to refine online experiences based on interest and importance.

 

Access to information and people is intoxicating. Creating an online portrait of who we are or who we want others to see is equality alluring. But without direction, governance, and discipline, we are at risk of giving ourselves to the very networks we value rather than managing the platforms to our advantage.

Our participation must be inspired by purpose and parameters. No, we are not obligated to connect with everyone who connects with us. We are obligated to maintain balance in who we are, what we value, and equally the value we invest in the communities in which we participate.


As Clay Shirky once observed, “There’s no such thing as information overload — only filter failure.”
My take? “Information overload is a symptom of our desire to not focus on what’s important.” It’s a choice.


Perhaps said another way, information overload is a symptom of our inability to focus on what’s truly important or relevant to who we are as individuals, professionals, and as human beings..."

 

Read full interesting article here:
http://www.briansolis.com/2012/05/the-fallacy-of-information-overload/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, k3hamilton, Gust MEES
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Katie Muirhead's curator insight, August 19, 2014 12:05 PM

This article is very important as it brings up a more fundamental question when examining the information overload we experience in the digital age. It questions whether this overload is a result of lack of curation, or whether it is in fact a choice and as a society we are actively changing the way we seek to experience media.