AJC's Frogroom
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AJC's Frogroom
All amphibians, all the time.
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Incredible skin helps springtails to keep dry

Incredible skin helps springtails to keep dry | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it

These small studs, arranged in grids and honeycombs, look completely unnatural. If the image was life-sized, you might think that they’re part of a bizarre children’s toy. If they had been photographed from far away, they might be buildings in an alien city. But they are neither. They have been intensely magnified; a thousand of them could fit across a human hair. They studs are part of the skin of a tiny insect-like creature called a springtail. They’re the secret behind its incredible waterproof shell.

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Poor ponds blamed for newt decline

Poor ponds blamed for newt decline | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it

Numbers of great crested newts are continuing to decline, with many threatened by the poor quality of the ponds they call home. A year-long study commissioned by government conservation agency Natural England revealed that although the amphibians are widespread across lowland England, they are now uncommon. The newts, which are protected by UK and European wildlife laws, have declined dramatically in the past 40 years in the face of loss of habitat and numbers are still falling.

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First major survey of amphibian fungus in Asia completed

First major survey of amphibian fungus in Asia completed | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it

An international team of researchers has completed the first major survey in Asia of a deadly fungus that has wiped out more than 200 species of amphibians worldwide. The massive survey could help scientists zero in on why the fungus has been unusually devastating in many parts of the globe -- and why Asian amphibians have so far been spared the same dramatic declines.

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New to Nature: Boulengerula fischeri

New to Nature: Boulengerula fischeri | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
Known as 'living pink spaghetti', this native of Rwanda is perhaps the most unusual caecilian.
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In pursuit of Romanian frogs (Bombina)

In pursuit of Romanian frogs (Bombina) | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
It was at several points along Transylvania’s Valea Cheii River that I observed numerous Yellow-bellied toads Bombina variegata. These small anurans (less than 50 mm) are strongly aquatic and the majority of individuals I saw were at the bottoms or edges of small pools, or sat on stream-side rocks or substrate. It was common to encounter several individuals within close proximity, and indeed the books say that this species is “often sociable” .
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'Lost' Rainbow Toad Rediscovered After 87 Years

'Lost' Rainbow Toad Rediscovered After 87 Years | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
Last seen in 1924, the Bornean rainbow toad (Ansonia latidisca) had been listed as one of the world's top 10 most wanted lost frogs, or those that hadn't been seen in at least a decade. Conservation scientists thought the chances of spotting the spindly-legged toad were slim. Until this rediscovery, scientists had only seen illustrations of the mysterious and long-legged toad existed, after collection by European explorers in the 1920s.
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Getting to grips with sticky frogs

Getting to grips with sticky frogs | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
Tree frog feet may provide a design for self-cleaning sticky surfaces. Although it has been known that tree frogs have sticky feet covered in mucus, the secret of how they keep them sticky has only just been discovered in the laboratory.
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A Beautiful Web of Poison Extends A New Strand

A Beautiful Web of Poison Extends A New Strand | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
The scientific tale of the rough-skinned newt begins five decades ago, with a story about three dead hunters in Oregon. Reportedly, the bodies of the hunters were discovered around a camp fire. They showed no signs of injury, and nothing had been stolen. The only strange thing about the scene was the coffee pot. Curled up inside was a newt.
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Darwin’s Frogs: Gold-Star Fathers

Darwin’s Frogs: Gold-Star Fathers | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
In the vast and wide Animal Kingdom, newborn young of egg-laying species are often left by their parents to fend for themselves after hatching. Sometimes, the newborn animals may even face danger from their own parents, who may attack and eat them! Even when the newborn animals receive care from their parents, it is normally from the mother, who may have incubated them and takes care of them. Yet, the situation is reversed in the case of frog native to the forest streams of Argentina and Chile, Rhinoderma darwinii, better known as Darwin’s Frog. Instead of simply fertilizing the eggs laid by the female and leaving, the male Darwin’s Frog goes above and beyond the call of duty, guarding the eggs for 2 weeks before they hatch, and then taking care of the young tadpoles until they mature and are able to fend for themselves. What is unique about the male Darwin’s Frog is the way in which it takes care of its young: by carrying them within its own throat! This creates the misleading illusion that the male Darwin’s Frog is actually “giving birth” from its mouth when the young emerge from the safety of its vocal sac.
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Tree-frogs act as Amazon warning

Tree-frogs act as Amazon warning | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
Amazon tree-frog biodiversity established over tens of millions of years, suggesting damage to the rainforest could take a similar time to recover.
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Scientists find deadly amphibian disease in the last disease-free region of central America

Scientists find deadly amphibian disease in the last disease-free region of central America | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
Smithsonian scientists have confirmed that chytridiomycosis, a rapidly spreading amphibian disease, has reached a site near Panama's Darien region. This was the last area in the entire mountainous neotropics to be free of the disease.
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A Frog's tale | Nature | The Earth Times

A Frog's tale | Nature | The Earth Times | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it

Australian researchers have found that green tree frogs (Litoria spp.) use condensation in the same way as windows on frosty mornings. During the dry season from June to September, Ozzy water is a precious commodity. These enterprising Amphibia expose themselves in such a way as to gather the air's excess moisture when temperatures plummet.

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Beetle larva lures and kills frogs, while the adult hunts and paralyses them

Beetle larva lures and kills frogs, while the adult hunts and paralyses them | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it

During its lifetime, a frog will snap up thousands of insects with its sticky, extendable tongue. But if it tries to eat an Epomis beetle, it’s more likely to become a meal than to get one. These Middle Eastern beetles include two species – Epomis circumscriptus and Epomis dejeani – that specialise at killing frogs, salamanders, and other amphibians.

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Could zooplankton save frogs from deadly epidemic?

Could zooplankton save frogs from deadly epidemic? | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it

Researchers at Oregon State University found that Daphnia magna will consume the zoopore or the free-swimming stage of the "chytrid" fungus. Encouraging, but not "the" answer to chytrid.

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Norfolk to get natterjack toad colony

Norfolk to get natterjack toad colony | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it

A new colony of rare natterjack toads is to be set up in Norfolk using more than 800 tadpoles from an RSPB nature reserve in Bedfordshire. Tadpoles from the Lodge near Sandy have been transferred to Norfolk Wildlife Trust's reserve at Grimston Warren. John Buckley, from the Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Trust, said it was hoped the tadpoles would become toadlets "within the next few weeks".

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The Incredible Amphibian Diversity of the Appalachians

The Incredible Amphibian Diversity of the Appalachians | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it

Over fifty species of salamanders are found in the southern Appalachians alone, making up ten per cent of the global diversity of salamanders. Many of these salamanders are found nowhere else on the planet and some species may only occur on a few isolated mountain peaks. What makes these misty mountains such an ideal location for salamanders?

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A frog's electric face (video)

This footage shows a frog embryo early on its development. Watch carefully and around nine seconds into the video you'll see a flash of light and dark patterns that looks like a template for where the face will subsequently develop.
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Live Animals In A Climate Change Simulator

Live Animals In A Climate Change Simulator | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
A Brazilian project called ADAPTA will put hundreds of species from the Amazon in conditions that mimic what the world will be like after years of climate change. The mission: to see which animals adapt and which will need our help to survive.
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Newt healing factors unaffected by age and injury

Newt healing factors unaffected by age and injury | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
A newt’s healing powers don’t diminish with age. As long as they live, they retain the ability to efficiently regrow their body parts (or at least, the lenses of their eyes), even if they have to do so over and over again.
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Tree frogs moving into cities

Tree frogs moving into cities | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
Tree frogs are going the way of the country mouse: to the city. This year, experts say, high levels of rain have left pools of water in which females can lay their eggs without fear of fish eating them. Grey tree frogs are typically found in woodsy, wet areas, but this year they can also be found hanging out on decks and crawling up the sides of houses in places that are not located near natural water sources.
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'Extinct' frog was under our noses all the time

'Extinct' frog was under our noses all the time | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
The Vegas Valley leopard frog (Lithobates fisheri), thought to be the only endemic US frog to have died out in modern times, lives on. The frog inhabited the Las Vegas Valley but had not been seen since 1942, after its habitat was drained to build Las Vegas. But when scientists took DNA samples from museum specimens of the Vegas Valley frogs, they found they were indistinguishable from Chiricahua leopard frogs living 400 kilometres away in central Arizona.
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Frog may be answer to finding cancer cure

Frog may be answer to finding cancer cure | AJC's Frogroom | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered that a compound found in the skin of the Waxy Monkey Leaf Frog could be used in the treatment of cancerous cells.
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