Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks
105 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Airbus reveals plane where cockpit windows are replaced by screens

Airbus reveals plane where cockpit windows are replaced by screens | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
Airbus has revealed a design that does away with windows entirely for pilots - instead giving them a huge wraparound screen.
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Wow!! A fully automated flight deck with digital displays as windows will present new challenges in regard to human factor training.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Plane speaking: Are aviation workers losing their hearing?

Plane speaking: Are aviation workers losing their hearing? | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
Airline personnel must endure high levels of noise for upwards of 40 hours a week. How does this constant noise exposure affect their hearing?
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Whether a pilot is flying jumbo jet on an international flight or operating a low capacity turbo-prop aircraft in the outback the effects of noise can produce various occupational health and safety risks. Such risks include hearing loss, increased levels of fatigue and poor crew communication.  Therefore, it is essential that pilots take precautions and wear correct ear protection when walking airside and operating an aircraft on the ground or during flight. 

more...
Courtney Rieck's curator insight, July 14, 2014 10:01 PM

This article show how the health and safety of personal in the aviation industry is important. It also shows that as the industry grows so does the demand for health and safety. This article identifies one of the many occupational health and safety risk involved not only for a pilot but for any whom are working in the area of aviation. 

 

As a training pilot this is important to me in the understanding of where the health and safety has came from to where it will be in the next five to ten years.  There are many other health and safety issues involved with aviation as well as hearing loss though hearing loss is one of the larger health and safety issues.

Brittany Yates's curator insight, July 16, 2014 11:35 PM

As a baggage handler trying to make my way up the ranks I found this article very interesting. Over the past year of being baggage handler I have noticed a decrease in my hearing already. It is great to see that the Airlines are aware of the increase in hearing loss in this industry and they are doing their best to try and assist with this issue. I myself have noticed in my workplace there has been a big push for all staff members to be wearing their hearing protection whilst airside. This is a massive occupational health and safety issue and it is great to see that these issues are being taken seriously.

Julie-Anne Coomer's curator insight, August 2, 2015 4:21 AM

I chose this article because I am currently seeking an apprenticeship in Aircraft Maintenance Engineering and the exposure to aircraft noise and its impact on hearing will affect my own personal health.  After reading it was promising to note that hearing loss was mainly associated with earlier employees but it does make note that hearing protection is still required around aircraft to ensure that loss of hearing is minimised.

Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Barcelona airport near-miss between planes caught on video

Barcelona airport near-miss between planes caught on video | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
A near-miss between two planes at Barcelona's airport in Spain has been caught on camera by an aviation enthusiast.
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

A clear indicator of how important communication is in maintaining safety margins in aviation.  If this situation had occurred in reduced visibility the reaction of the pilot would have been delayed. This is due to the transition phase from instrument flight to visual flight at the end of the instrument approach procedure. This presents a similar scenario that alarmingly echoes the events of world's worst airline disaster in Tenerife , Canary Island on 27 March 1977  where two Boeing 747 collided on the runway. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

SMS For Aviation - Human Factors

Ralph Bancroft's insight:

CASA has released a six part safety management kit covering topics such as safety management basics through to human factors. CASA's strong focus on human factors training is due to a recent study that 75% of aircraft accidents are due to human factors deficiencies.

 

It was traditionally considered that human error was a sign of weakness and an indicator of the quality of a pilot. Though recently it has been accepted that errors though undesirable  are matter of fact and unavoidable. The term error management formalized this theory and focused on management of flight crew errors  rather than prevention.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Former Australian pilot says toxic engine fumes made him sick

Former Australian pilot says toxic engine fumes made him sick | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
A FORMER pilot for Australia's largest airline claims he was paralysed in mid-flight because of "aerotoxic syndrome" - exposure to toxic engine fumes on airliners, The Sunday Telegraph reports.
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Aerotoxic syndrome is an occupational health and safety risk which impacts decision making, effects judgment and can incapacitate flight crew. The air-conditioning system in a modern day aircraft is technically referred to as "bleed air" as the air is bled off the engine or auxiliary power unit (APU). If a leak exists in the system bleed air may introduce toxic chemicals such as synthetic jet oils, hydraulic fluids and fuel vapors directly into the flight deck and aircraft cabin.  The contaminated air displaces oxygen from the red blood cells which leads to oxygen deprivation in the brain resulting in reduced human performance.

 

The occurrence of aerotoxic syndrome in modern jet aircraft may introduce further questions and criticism into planned heavy aircraft maintenance offshore? 

more...
Lizette Greyling's curator insight, May 1, 2015 5:34 AM

Aerotoxic syndrome is a term used to describe the short or long term health effect caused by breathing cabin air which could contain engine oils and chemicals.

 

Concerns over these levels are nothing new but a recent lawsuit between British Airways and a couple of their pilots have sparked new interest in this area. 

 

As with other industries for example a maintenance shop in a mine it is important to measure the levels of chemicals at all times to ensure that the employees and passengers aren't over exposed or suffer long term effects. It is important to monitor the areas before and during flight and to make sure there is proper ventilation and fans are in place.

 

 

Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Language of air travel: How traffic control keeps you safe

Language of air travel: How traffic control keeps you safe | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
Communication mix ups between pilots and traffic controllers occur daily. Here's why you're still safe.
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Effective and standardised radio communication between pilots, air traffic control and ground staff is essential to ensure that the aviation environment remains incident free.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

NTSB faults Asiana pilots for 777 crash, says complex automated controls a factor

NTSB faults Asiana pilots for 777 crash, says complex automated controls a factor | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
Boeing’s statement said it “respectfully disagrees” with the NTSB’s findings on its cockpit automation related to the deadly crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 last July. “We note that the 777 has an extraordinary record of safety.”
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

 Compared to the Wright Flyer in 1903 the Boeing 777-200ER supports automation technology that allows it to fly more efficiently and comfortably. Automation on modern day airline transport aircraft eliminates direct pilot handling error and also affords an increased situational awareness by limiting task saturation. But can too much technology have a negative influence?

 

 Asiana Flight 214 a Boeing 777 crashed short of the runway while making a visual approach into San Francisco. The National Transport Safety Bureau (NTSB) concluded that the crash was directly attributable to flight crew error due to insufficient knowledge of the aircraft's automation systems (specifically auto throttle). The very system that is designed to reduce pilot work load resulted in 20-30 errors prior to the crash.

 

This incident has reignited the importance of Threat and Error Management (TEM) in high work load environments. The TEM model provides a sequential order for the crew to identify and manage occurring errors before an incident can result. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Airtime : CRM Safety Video produced by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, Australia - YouTube

Airtime is a Crew Resource Management training video designed for LCRPT (Low Capacity RPT) and General Aviation operators. It includes a primary story which ...
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Airtime is a Crew Resource Management (CRM) training video produced by CASA to identify key human factor limitations in airline environments. The video looks at various threats and errors that flight crew may face during day to day operations in a low capacity airline.   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

CASA Safety Video - Spatial Disorientation - YouTube

An experienced pilot demonstrates the physical symptoms of spatial disorientation in a ground-based Barany chair. Essential viewing for all pilots. Civil Avi...
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Another great example of how CASA provides interactive safety information for operators and pilots! 

more...
Michael Tomlinson's curator insight, July 15, 2014 12:47 AM

In OH&S it is important to know and understand the human physical limitations in your role. Here is an example of how even experienced professionals can be easily tricked into thinking they are safe, when really they could be in terrible danger.

Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

The JetBlue pilot's breakdown and the high stress of 'safety sensitive positions'

The JetBlue pilot's breakdown and the high stress of 'safety sensitive positions' | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it

Incident reignites concerns about the growing stresses on airline crews and the systems in place for spotting a problem

Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Working as an airline pilot domestically or internationally involves an environment that is forever changing.  A standard A to B flight (sector) may not be as simple as it feels while sitting in row 18 as fare paying passenger. Flight crews manage high work volumes associated with various airspace, maintain flight schedules and airline operational expectations day to day.

 

The JetBlue incident involving a mental breakdown by the Captain on a flight from New York to Las Vegas proves the high stress nature of the job. This incident is a good example of what can happen if suitable mitigators are not put in place to monitor the mental health of flight crew.

 

Human factors training for airline pilots cover stress identification, coping methods and awareness. Despite this, incidents relating to stress are still occurring and can prove to be an occupational health and safety risk . Therefore, stress management should also be implemented into company safety management systems to act as a counter measure in this new age of airline aviation.  

more...
Julie-Anne Coomer's curator insight, August 2, 2015 4:14 AM

I found this article interesting in relation to the current issue of pilot shortage.  A number of my instructors during my Aircraft Maintenance course were ex-commercial pilots over the age of 50 and they frequently commented how much the industry had changed (in a negative way) since they began their career.  As mentioned in this article, the industry is unstable for pilots and the financial rewards are considerably reduced and the stress increased.  This can be attributed to many factors including greater competitiveness among companies, the perceived increased risk of terrorism and greater regulation.

Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

10,000 Qantas jobs could go offshore despite safety fears: unions

10,000 Qantas jobs could go offshore despite safety fears: unions | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
AS many as 10,000 Qantas jobs, including maintenance staff, could be sent offshore, despite fresh concerns about safety.
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Moving heavy aviation maintenance offshore may not necessarily mean that aviation safety is critically compromised but such a connotation may result in an unfavorable public opinion of the operator.  Such undertones in a company may reduce the confidence of its operating flight crew. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Civil Aviation Safety Authority - Casa's role

Civil Aviation Safety Authority - Casa's role | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

CASA's primary role is the implementation of safety regulations outlined in the Civil Aviation Act 1988. The Act provides a regulatory framework for operators, pilots and any personnel operating in an aviation environment.   CASA does an excellent job in promoting safety in aviation through social media, user friendly documentation and interactive learning modules.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

IATA - Dangerous Goods

IATA - Dangerous Goods | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
Ensuring safe transport of dangerous goods by air and that undeclared dangerous goods do not get on board an aircraft is one of many key objectives of IATA's dangerous goods programme.
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Dangerous good training is mandatory in all aviation companies as certain materials are prohibited to be transported by air.  The responsibility of accepting cargo lies with the flight crew however the loading procedures and identification of materials whether "ok to fly” are managed by the ground crew (in larger operations). To avoid occupational health and safety risks from occurring team work between flight and ground crew is essential.    

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Are Airline Pilots Addicted to Automation?

Are Airline Pilots Addicted to Automation? | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
Automated flight systems are causing "automation addiction" amongst today's commercial airline pilots and weakening their response time to mechanical failures and emergency situations according to a new study by safety officials.
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

Similarly to Asiana Flight 214 automation was directly linked to the crash of a Turkish Airlines flight in 2009.  The age of automation is considered to have had a negative influence on pilot "stick and rudder" flying ability. Rory Kay, an airline captain and co-chairman of a Federal Aviation Administration committee on pilot training confirms this suggestion in the article "automation addiction" stating that: "The technology behind the auto-pilot on commercial aircrafts only requires pilots to do approximately three minutes of flying -- during take-off and landing."  Nevertheless, automation should not be solely considered as unconstructive. In an airline environment  it has been proven to reduce stress, increase pilot situational awareness of the external environment and allow the aircraft to fly safely in marginal weather conditions. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

NASA - Modeling Radiation Exposure for Pilots, Crew and Passengers on Commercial Flights

NASA - Modeling Radiation Exposure for Pilots, Crew and Passengers on Commercial Flights | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it

A NASA Langley-led effort is trying to build a better model to predict the amount of damaging radiation pilots, flight crews and frequent flyers are exposed to on commercial airline flights.

Ralph Bancroft's insight:

It is very interesting to think that airline pilots on high altitude routes are considered "radiation workers" and are exposed to radiation levels greater than that of nuclear power plant workers!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ralph Bancroft
Scoop.it!

Pilots fell asleep in cockpit on long-haul UK flight: report

Pilots fell asleep in cockpit on long-haul UK flight: report | Airline Flight Crew - Potential OHS Risks | Scoop.it
Two pilots on a British airliner on a long haul flight fell asleep in the cockpit, leaving the packed jet travelling unsupervised on autopilot.
Ralph Bancroft's insight:

The efficiency and sustainability of modern day jet aircraft has revolutionized the airline industry globally. Unfortunately the advancement of the hardware (aircraft) and liveware (human) have not remained in synchronization.  This has become evident in increased levels of fatigue amongst flight crew, which is becoming a dangerous and common occupational health and safety risk.

 

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), Australia's aviation safety regulator, confirms this theory:

 

"Aviation industry trends suggest fatigue-related accident risk may increase in the future. As the airline industry becomes more competitive, operators are more likely to extend pilot work period limits and utilize more shift work in order to improve productivity. "(Fatigue - The Rules are Changing)

 

The international British Airways flight fortunately resulted in an inconsequential outcome with no procedure or airspace external to the aircraft being directly violated. In comparison to this incident in the last decade eight international airline accidents resulted in fatalities which were directly related to pilot fatigue. Fatigue related accidents are not an isolated event as 64 incidents occurred in Australian airspace alone.

 

CASA is in the process of revamping Australia's  fatigue management regulation (Civil Aviation Order 48.1)  to address the changing 24 hour nature of the aviation industry. The implementation of a three tier approach to fatigue management will generate safety benefits for airline operators and pilots. 

more...
No comment yet.