Agua
Follow
Find tag "resources"
89.2K views | +16 today

¿Quieres suscribirte al resumen semanal de noticias?

Add your lead generation form welcome message here
Agua
Agua es vida
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa from The Great Transition
Scoop.it!

Time for some optimism about the climate crisis

Time for some optimism about the climate crisis | Agua | Scoop.it

"There are strong grounds for believing that the climate crisis can be overcome and that many people’s lives, particularly in the poorer countries, could be materially better than they are now because of the work the production of biofuels and biochemicals to replace their fossil equivalents should bring, coupled with the additional fertility that biochar should create. Since the alternative is industrial and societal decline and, after increasing unrest, an eventual collapse, there’s every reason to think the system will incline the right way. But one thing is necessary first: the twin myths that there’s plenty of energy and that economic growth can continue must be exposed."


Via Willy De Backer
more...
Willy De Backer's curator insight, March 9, 2013 3:02 AM

Long but brilliant analysis connecting the ecological, economic and energy crises. Maybe a bit too optimistic in their belief that our elites and institutions will be smart enough to prevent collapse but worth reading.

Rescooped by Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: The Global Water Crisis

Infographic: The Global Water Crisis | Agua | Scoop.it
Despite the critical role that water has in our everyday lives, few people realize that the world’s freshwater supply is facing a major crisis in the near future.

Take a look at this infographic for more details, statistics and data on the 'invisible threat to humanity's future' to help increase awareness with regard to the global water crisis...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Battle for Water

Battle for Water | Agua | Scoop.it

Many experts see water scarcity as a potential looming crisis.  Water scarcity, pollution and mismanagement are going to become increasingly important as the global population continues to rise farther above 7 billion.  AlertNet has put together a dynamic special feature on water with videos, infographics and interactive maps in addition to the following articles:

 

--Water scarcity – Conflicts of interests

--How much “virtual water” do you use every day?

--Water maps spark concern about "liquid gold rush"

--Myanmar in the dark over hydropower for Asia

--Thirsty South Asia's river rifts threaten "water wars"

--EXPERT VIEWS: New water policies are key to tackling scarcity

 

This is a must-see resource with multiple regional (South Asia, Middle East, Central Asia, Southeast Asia, etc.) applications and thematic (political, environmental, resource management, development, etc.) strands as well. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic]

Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic] | Agua | Scoop.it

Ever notice how we ask for “just water” at a restaurant? Like the source of all life is somehow inferior to soda or a glass of wine (both of which are mostly water)? A new infographic gives you just about every fact you need to know about water… including the ways we’re wasting it.

Take a look, and stop by the original article to share any other facts about water you wished more people knew. 


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Agua | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.