Veille Scientifique Agroalimentaire - Agronomie
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Veille Scientifique Agroalimentaire - Agronomie
Un concentré de nouveautés dans les domaines de l'Agroalimentaire et l'Agronomie. (AgroSup Dijon, Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté)
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Rescooped by Pierre-André Marechal from Elevage non-conventionnel et mini-élevage
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Nutritional composition and safety aspects of edible insects

Nutritional composition and safety aspects of edible insects | Veille Scientifique Agroalimentaire - Agronomie | Scoop.it
Keywords:Alternative protein source;Edible insects;Entomophagy;Food safety;Nutritive value

Insects, a traditional food in many parts of the world, are highly nutritious and especially rich in proteins and thus represent a potential food and protein source. A compilation of 236 nutrient compositions in addition to amino acid spectra and fatty acid compositions as well as mineral and vitamin contents of various edible insects as derived from literature is given and the risks and benefits of entomophagy are discussed. Although the data were subject to a large variation, it could be concluded that many edible insects provide satisfactorily with energy and protein, meet amino acid requirements for humans, are high in MUFA and/or PUFA, and rich in several micronutrients such as copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, selenium, and zinc as well as riboflavin, pantothenic acid, biotin, and in some cases folic acid. Liabilities of entomophagy include the possible content of allergenic and toxic substances as well as antinutrients and the presence of pathogens. More data are required for a thorough assessment of the nutritional potential of edible insects and proper processing and decontamination methods have to be developed to ensure food safety.


Via Jacques Mignon
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Fear factor seems relevant in decomposing bug's effect on soil

Fear factor seems relevant in decomposing bug's effect on soil | Veille Scientifique Agroalimentaire - Agronomie | Scoop.it
The next time you kill an insect, you might want to do it quickly — for the sake of the environment.

 

When a grasshopper dies, the chemical composition of its decomposing body has a large influence on the microscopic processes going on in the area's soil. And the chemicals in the corpse are influenced by the dread of living near a killer spider.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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