Africa and Beyond
Follow
2.0K views | +0 today
Africa and Beyond
Africa, the Middle East, Food, Agriculture, History and Culture
Curated by diana buja
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by diana buja from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Africa and Beyond | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 3, 1:17 PM

You hear about how people in Rwanda forgiving the perpetrators that killed their families, parents, husbands, and children.  They can say that they have fully forgiven them and that they are on good terms with each other or they forgave someone and that was it.  Seeing the body language that these people have together really makes it real.  Some people are seen awkwardly next to each other while others are touching, even holding hands.  Seeing the pictures of both perpetrator and survivor together after forgiveness has been granted can do a lot more than words can in telling what kind of relationship these people have together twenty years after the genocide. 

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 11, 3:16 PM

No words can really describe this article! This  is both sad and courageous! These people who murdered and destroyed lives are faced with shame and their own heartache, while the people's lives they destroyed have shown true strenght to not only be photographed with these people, but to also forgive them for what they've done. The human spirit truly is an amazing thing!

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 11:17 AM

In an almost unthinkable arrangement, these pictures feature victims of the Rwandan genocide standing with the perpetrators who often killed their families. In a genocide where most of the killings were committed with machetes and perpetrated by neighbors attacking neighbors, it is difficult to imagine how the survivors feel and how they can stand to forgive the killers. It brings up the question of what right do these killers have to ask forgiveness from their victims?

Rescooped by diana buja from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The 2011 Failed States Index

The 2011 Failed States Index | Africa and Beyond | Scoop.it

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  Foreign Policy, in conjunction with the Fund for Peace, has created a statistical ranking to measure the lack of effective political institutions.  For the 4th year running, Somalia has been statistically measured as the most failed state on Earth. Chad and Sudan are respectively ranked as the 2nd and 3rd most failed states.The 12 metrics that are a part of this index are:

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Illegitimate Govts.

•Brain Drain

•Public Services

•Inequality

•Group Grievances

•Human Rights

•Economic Decline

•Security Forces

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 16, 2012 9:57 PM
The global fallout of the Arab revolutions may be largely determined by demographics and political stability. Unlike Somalia for example which is in total anarchy, the Arab Spring uprisings occurred in more stable but oppressive governments. So this brings up the question, can a failed state rescue itself?
Derek Ethier's comment, November 5, 2012 2:35 PM
Althought sub-Saharan Africa has 5 of the 10 most quickly developing countries, they still lag very far behind the rest of the world in quality of living. Somalia, Chad and Suda are the most failed states on Earth, in order. The governments are unable to protect/provide for their people, brain drains suck the great minds to more developed countries, income inequalities ravage the nations, basic human rights are denied and the economies are pathetic. Overall, it is a sad story as many of these African nations also suffer from drought, famine and massive food shortages.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 4:11 PM

 I wonder why it is difficult for states to be formed. I would think it would be great because the village people won’t be forced to make big decisions they can just hire someone to do it for them. But in the other hand there would be other people who will make it difficult for them and will ruin it for everyone else. Becoming a state can change there live. They should have approved to become a state.

Rescooped by diana buja from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Guns, Germs & Steel

Guns, Germs & Steel | Africa and Beyond | Scoop.it

This video (like the book with the same title) explores the course of human history to find the geographic factors that can help to explain the global inequalities between societies. Jared Diamond’s answer lies in the military strength (guns), superior pathogens (germs) and industrial production (steel) that agricultural societies were able to develop as the critical advantages over hunter/gatherer societies. The raw materials at the disposal of the societies inhabiting particular environments partially explain the economic possibilities before them. Diamond hypothesizes that the orientations of the continents play a critical role in the relative advantages among agricultural societies (East-West orientations allow for greater diffusion of agricultural technologies than North-South orientations since the growing seasons and ecology are more compatible), giving Eurasia an advantage over Africa and the Americas. The Fertile Crescent had native plant and animal species ideal for domestication, which then diffused to Europe. Societies that have more developed animal husbandry develop a resistance to more powerful germs. Consequently, when two societies come in contact those with the best resistance to the worse diseases are more successful. Similarly, industrial production depends on an agricultural surplus since specialization requires that some workers not needing to produce their own food to work on technological innovations. Societies that had agricultural advantages were able to invest in technologies (primarily steel) that would enhance their advantages over other societies, as seen during colonization. Societies that had the best environments had access to large plant eating mammals suitable for domestication and the most productive grains would be poised to produce more dangerous guns, germs and steel—the key resources for economic dominion resulting in global inequalities.


Diamond’s critics argue that the ‘geography hypothesis’ is environmental determinism that does not properly value human choices into the equation. Still, the core of this book is the search for connections between the themes of Geography with a spatial framework and the video is available via Netflix, public libraries and many other outlets.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 5:16 PM

I found this just browsing the suggestions, and I was like "Whoa! We learned this in class!" So I thought that it was really neat. 

Diamond's theory is an example of environmental determinism, because he claimed that the environment and where people lived affected the people, and that's why not everybody is equal. 

I personally agree with his theory, because it makes a lot of sense when I watched the movie/episodes.