Africa and Beyond
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Africa and Beyond
Africa, the Middle East, Food, Agriculture, History and Culture
Curated by diana buja
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Business Languages In Africa

Business Languages In Africa | Africa and Beyond | Scoop.it

"The Main Languages of Business in Africa."


Via Seth Dixon, gawlab
diana buja's insight:

Well, so - now we are to call languages that were introduced in the 19th century *and some earlier * by colonialists - BUSINESS LANGUAGES.  ...

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Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:46 PM

This map is a simple but powerful one. Africa is the continent that contains the most nations (53), yet it uses only six languages for business. Not surprisingly, all of the languages (with the exception of Arabic) are European in origin. Clearly, the effects of colonialism are still felt around the world in former colonies. The languages that were forced upon various African countries by their colonizers have endured and become the main languages of business in their respective countries. What is just as unfortunate as the roots of colonialism holding fast, if not more so, is the absence of any indigenous languages being used as the language of business in any of the countries of Africa. While using a business language that is spoken by much of the world is surely a matter of practicality and logistics, it is still robbing African countries of their heritage and culture to some degree.

 

This brings up the issue of globalization and how it is constantly at odds with the preservation of culture and tradition. In order for Africa (or any continent or region or country) to function in the modern world, it must be capable of conducting business in a language that is spoken by its business partners. The ability to do business with virtually any person, company, or country in the world is an obviously invaluable one. At the same time, however, it allows for the subtle and gradual erasure of unique culture and traditions. So while it would be ideal for cultural preservation for countries to conduct business in their indigenous languages, it seems to be a necessary evil for smaller and less influential countries to adopt the languages of their more powerful and influential business partners if they wish to survive in today's world. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 29, 2015 4:24 PM

The lingering effects of colonialism, so strongly relevant in every aspect of African ways of life, are perhaps most evident in the "lingua franca" of African nations today. With a multitude of different ethnicities and languages in use in every African nation today, the result of the arbitrarily drawn national borders made by European colonizers, necessitates the use of the one language that's commonly spoken across every independent nation- a European tongue. This system, while a necessity in today's world, is a solution that no one is quite happy with. It reminds Africans of all ages of the power still held by their colonizers over their everyday lives, a stark reminder of the horrors of the previous century at every business meeting and every exchange of goods. This harms the national psyche of each nation, as well as undermining the importance and pride Africans deservedly maintain in their own native languages. European-made borders, however, make it difficult to find another, native language that every ethnic group can agree upon. As a result, the European languages are still in use in Africa, and will most likely still be in use for some time to come. It's a system that no one likes but, for the time being, everyone must accept as reality.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:26 AM

This map is a great resource in showing the diversity of language in Africa. Of course, this map discounts the many native African languages. It instead focuses on the language of business in the continent. That language, has been influence by the European colonization of Africa. The chosen language of business is often tied to the colonizer of the region. The diversity of language in Africa is staggering to say the least.  

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No, a nation’s geography is not its destiny

No, a nation’s geography is not its destiny | Africa and Beyond | Scoop.it
One of the most widely accepted alternative theories of world inequality is the geography hypothesis, which claims that the great divide between rich and poor countries is created by geographical differences.

 

This article is an excerpt of the forthcoming book "Why Nations Fail" that should serve as an ideological counterweight to the book "Guns, Germs and Steel."  The authors argue that the wealth of a country is most closely correlated with the degree to which the average person shares in the overall growth of its economy, meaning that political institutions are more relevant to economic success and development than physical geographic resources. 

 

For more on this upcoming book and it's hypothesis see this NY Times review: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/18/magazine/why-countries-go-bust.html


Via Seth Dixon
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mb's comment, March 20, 2012 1:23 PM
the authors write a blog as well: http://whynationsfail.com/
Tony Burton's comment, March 20, 2012 1:38 PM
Thanks for the link!
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The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate)

The world map of chocolate (made out of chocolate) | Africa and Beyond | Scoop.it
You may be focussing on chocolate over the weekend - but where does it come from? A global trade analysed. In chocolate (this is what maps are made for!

 

What is the geography of chocolate like?  There is a dark side (no pun intended) to the production of cocoa in many places such as West Africa. 


Via Seth Dixon
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ethne staniland's curator insight, May 16, 2013 11:33 AM

Interesting for our KS1 chocolate topic.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:43 PM

We all love chocolate.  We all love diamonds and jewels.  In western worlds, these items are easily come by in grocery stores and elsewhere, but what got them there was a challenge.  People in poorer tropical regions around the world worked to get the raw goods of these delicate items we all enjoy.  The payout difference is immense from cocoa to chocolate.  It is sometimes a very crooked market where if it wasn't for the hard working people who get the raw ingredients, chocolate as we know it wouldn't be the same.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:06 AM

I hope the production keep growing up. We need more chocolate and specially in Africa. 

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Agribusiness Suffers 'Pink Slime' Fallout

Agribusiness Suffers 'Pink Slime' Fallout | Africa and Beyond | Scoop.it
Beef Products Inc. permanently closed its plants at Waterloo and two other locations on Monday, saying it could not overcome the damage from a controversy over beef trimmings. The closings will affect 650 workers, including 220 in Waterloo.

 

This is an interesting issue coming out of Iowa. The governor and former governor (the current Secretary of Agriculture) have been putting on a full-court press of positive PR for "pink slime." How does this decision impact the local agriculture industries?  What other impacts will this plant closure have beyond agriculture?  While the market compel agribusiness to reform long term?

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No, a nation’s geography is not its destiny

No, a nation’s geography is not its destiny | Africa and Beyond | Scoop.it
One of the most widely accepted alternative theories of world inequality is the geography hypothesis, which claims that the great divide between rich and poor countries is created by geographical differences.

 

This article is an excerpt of the forthcoming book "Why Nations Fail" that should serve as an ideological counterweight to the book "Guns, Germs and Steel."  The authors argue that the wealth of a country is most closely correlated with the degree to which the average person shares in the overall growth of its economy, meaning that political institutions are more relevant to economic success and development than physical geographic resources. 

 

For more on this upcoming book and it's hypothesis see this NY Times review: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/18/magazine/why-countries-go-bust.html


Via Seth Dixon
more...
mb's comment, March 20, 2012 1:23 PM
the authors write a blog as well: http://whynationsfail.com/
Tony Burton's comment, March 20, 2012 1:38 PM
Thanks for the link!