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Soil moisture for winter wheat mixed - The Lawton Constitution

Soil moisture for winter wheat mixed - The Lawton Constitution | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Soil moisture for winter wheat mixed
The Lawton Constitution
Soil moisture for winter wheat planting this fall is a mixed bag, according to Jeff Edwards, Oklahoma State University Extension small grains specialist.

Via Kolbie VanDusseldorp
Loran Sneller's insight:

This year for winter wheat they don't know if it is going to grow like it should or not. Soils in central Oklahoma are dry on top, but have good subsoil moisture. However, soils in western Oklahoma and the Panhandle areas are dry all the way down. I don't think that is is going to be a good year. Just from what I read it doesn't sound good.

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Kolbie VanDusseldorp's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:01 PM

In Oklahoma the soil is not in the right conditions for growing wheat. The ground temp. can be up to 90 degrees at some points and it dry at the top. The dry and hot conditions cause the wheat not to germinate and not produce good yield. This causes no crop to be picked and can affect the wellness of the soil. With the hot and dry conditions it makes it hard for crops to yield and for the soil to recooperate itself for crops. Not only does the wheat not germinate but cause bad soil erosion. In the good, agronomists are coming up with new genetics to create a type of wheat to be able to produce in this type of weather. Agronomists are trying to create a wheat with a longer stem in order to reach deeper into the ground.

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Washington state alfalfa crop may be contaminated with genetic ...

Washington state alfalfa crop may be contaminated with genetic ... | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Farmer in Washington state reports his alfalfa shipment was rejected after testing positive for genetic modification.

Via Kolbie VanDusseldorp
Loran Sneller's insight:

The grops are being ready to come out of the ground and now some of then are contaminated. Alfalfa is America's fourth largest crop, behind corn, wheat and soybeans. It is the main feed for the dairy industry. A confirmed case of contamination could hurt the organic dairy industry, which is now worth $26billion a year. Forcing farmers to find new sources of GM-free feed.

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Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 7:58 PM
Farmers are worried too much about yields, and not as much as quality of products anymore. They know that the more they put for sale the more money they will get, and once the product is off their hands, it's no longer their problem. They don't think about the effects that the altercations they do to their plants will actually have on the people or animals consuming them.
Haley van Zante's comment, October 3, 2013 10:03 PM
This topic is very interesting because I don't know much about crops either, but I think that they are wasting their time and energy. People are getting sick, and to me it seems like they don't even notice, and they should.
alex barnett's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:51 AM

A lot of foods in the US have hormones in their products to for longivity, color, and size ect. It's scary to think what these products that contain hormones can do to our bodies in the long run.

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Back to the farm: State Fair puts agriculture front and center - Lynchburg News and Advance

Back to the farm: State Fair puts agriculture front and center Lynchburg News and Advance In other words, “the Farm Bureau is like agriculture on steroids,” so what better way to carry out that mission than “to be able to exhibit and showcase...
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PHL won't import rice beyond WTO commitments in 2014

PHL won't import rice beyond WTO commitments in 2014 | Agriculture | Scoop.it
The Department of Agriculture on Wednesday said there would be no need for Philippines to import rice outside the commitments under the World Trade Organization.
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Dundee Corp.'s push into the world of food and agriculture ...

Dundee Corp.'s push into the world of food and agriculture ... | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Two years on, Dundee Agricultural Corp. continues to build its portfolio of companies.
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Colorado floodwaters menace state's $41 billion agriculture sector - Reuters

Colorado floodwaters menace state's $41 billion agriculture sector - Reuters | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Colorado floodwaters menace state's $41 billion agriculture sector Reuters DENVER (Reuters) - Colorado farmers and ranchers are bracing for widespread damage to the agriculture industry, one of the state's leading economic engines, from deadly...
Loran Sneller's insight:

This is really bad because now none of the farmers are going to have food for any of there animals. The corn will rot and then there cattle will go hungry and anybe even die. Agriculture pumps $41 billion a year into the state's economy and employs.Ron Ackerman, whose family harvests hay in La Salle, Colorado, in flood-stricken Weld County, said he fears their fall crop may be a total loss. This is one of the worst things that could have happened because everybody already has there crops in.

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Makenzie Bossard's comment, September 27, 2013 12:00 AM
This is crazy and sad at the same time. It really sucks that the farmers have lost so much money from the floods.
Paige Anderson's comment, October 3, 2013 5:51 PM
I hope the farm animals will be able to get food.
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Fifty counties get agriculture disaster designation because of heavy rains - al.com (blog)

Fifty counties get agriculture disaster designation because of heavy rains - al.com (blog) | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Trussvilletribune
Fifty counties get agriculture disaster designation because of heavy rains
al.com (blog)
(AP) — A natural disaster declaration has been issued for 50 Alabama counties by the U.S.
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Southwest Idaho growers salvaging crops hit by hail - Capital Press

Southwest Idaho growers salvaging crops hit by hail - Capital Press | Agriculture | Scoop.it
Southwest Idaho growers salvaging crops hit by hail Capital Press Martineau, who farms 7 miles south of Nampa, is among several southwestern Idaho growers now attempting to salvage as much of their crops as possible following the devastating hail...

Via Kolbie VanDusseldorp
Loran Sneller's insight:

Bean acreage had already been cut and laid down, awaiting harvest, when golf ball-sized hail arrived on Sept. 5. Two hours after the hail pounded his beans into the ground. Another front brought an inch and a half of rain, covering his garden pole in mud. Attempting to salvage as much of their crops as possible following the devastating hail storm, which swept through an area 3 miles wide and 25 miles long. This is really bad because some of the farmers won't have anything to combine or harvest.

 

 

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AJ Kingery's comment, October 1, 2013 10:42 AM
This could lose peoples jobs. They lost all their money that they waited for all year but now its all lost. They couldn't of done anything to it but they just lost all their money. That's how they get paid by growing crops but all of them are gone.
Brent Van Der Wiel's comment, October 3, 2013 8:02 PM
Storms are a risk that farmers have to accept and find a way around. If hail and damage hits crops early, they may not continue to grow, but if the hail is late in the season the crops will still be easily salvageable. Hail damage does a lot in terms of bushels harvested, and it can cause the farmers to lose a very large profit. This could put some smaller farmers out of business, but larger fields shouldn't have a problem recovering
Kolbie VanDusseldorp's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:51 PM

In southwest Idaho crops were damaged severely by hail and thunderstorms. Crops were destroyed causing farmers to sell livestock and do other work to make their money. These crops were being salvaged as much as possible  after these storms hit. Not only field crops but family gardens were destroyed. These families were devastated after seeing this damage and knowing they will have to wait till next year to plant again.

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Hog herd growth spurs upgrade to soy price hopes

Hog herd growth spurs upgrade to soy price hopes | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Standard Chartered lifted its forecast for soybean prices to above the futures curve, citing strong demand from pork producers – both in the US and in China, where reviving margins are sparking herd rebuilding.

The comments came ahead of the announcement on Wednesday by the US Department of Agriculture, through its daily reporting system, of the sale of 1.93m tonnes of US soybeans to China, plus a further 182,000 tonnes to an unknown destination. 

The bank recommended investors buy Chicago's September 2014 soybean contract, trading on Wednesday at $12.21 ¾ a bushel, foreseeing it rising to $13.50 a bushel, spurred by tightness injected both by a disappointing US harvest and resilient demand.

Indeed, the bank said it questioned "the rationale" behind a US Department of Agriculture downgrade last week by 35m bushels to its forecasts for the US soybean crush and exports in 2013-14, given hog sector dynamics.

"As we enter the fourth quarter of 2013, the market should receive support from the tightening balance sheet in the US and improving demand from China," StanChart analyst Abah Ofon said.

'Strongly bullish'

In the US, StanChart flagged the appetite to expand the pig herd which has driven hedge funds to take their most bullish position ever on Chicago lean hog futures and options, holding a record net long position as of last Tuesday.

"Investor sentiment towards hogs is strongly bullish," Mr Ofon said, noting industry reports "that producers are enjoying positive margins for the first time in about a year".

Margins are being helped by, besides a retreat in grain prices, decent pork exports.

While down 5% year on year in the first seven months of 2013 to 1.23m tonnes, this includes a mainly accounted for by a slump in shipments to Russia, which has imposed curbs on pork obtained from hogs finished using the ractopamine growth promoter.

"We expect strong US pork exports," Mr Ofon said, flagging China as a "core market, as its improving domestic demand provides momentum to the global supply chain".

Chinese dynamics

Indeed, Chinese pork imports rose 30% year on year to 51,000 tonnes in July, and should maintain growth through 2013 given seasonal patterns and pork prices which are at their highest since April last year.

This rise in prices is encouraging domestic production too, boosting the important hog-to-feed ratio, and driving a sustained increase in the Chinese herd, by far the world's biggest, to 473m head this month, up 1.3% from August.

The quest for soymeal, the high protein feed produced from soybeans, has lifted profits for soy processors, and could continue to "improve crush margins for processors in China, in turn pulling soybean prices higher" and improving the appetite for imports.

Corn vs soybeans

The support for soybean prices contrasts with a soft week for Chicago futures, which on Wednesday set course for a fourth successive negative close.

This has left them underperforming corn, reducing the November soybean futures: December corn futures ratio to 2.95:1 from a historically high level of 3.01:1 reached last week.

Indeed, some brokers, such as Morgan Stanley and Societe Generale, have flagged the potential for corn futures to outperform soybeans, given the extent of risk premium investors have already built into prices of the oilseed.

The forecast of growth in demand from US hog producers comes against a backdrop of a slump in US slaughter rates which last week fell to 2.172m head, down 10.5% year on year.

Analysts have said it is unclear yet whether this reduction is down to one-off effects, such as hot August which may have slowed the growth of hogs to slaughter weight, or to effects such as a decrease in use of ractopamine, or potentially to greater herd losses from PECDv porcine diahorrea virus than had been thought.

"Eventually, slaughter weights will tell us if producers are falling behind on marketings or if the weekly slaughter decline points to a true shortage of hogs on the ground," a report from Paragon Economics and Steiner Consulting said.


Via Stéphane Bisaillon, Kolbie VanDusseldorp
Loran Sneller's insight:

As the crops are coming out of the field some of the soybeans are going up in price. The price now is $12.21 a bussel and some people see it going to $13.50 a bussel.The bank said it questioned "the rationale" behind a US Department of Agriculture downgrade last week by 35m bushels to its forecasts for the US soybean crush and exports in 2013-14, given hog sector dynamics. I think that this is a good thing because then people are making good money from last year when we didn't get anything!

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Kolbie VanDusseldorp's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:29 PM

The more time that goes by the higher prices and demands get. In the hog industry in the U.S. many farmers are struggling to keep on top with raising hogs. It costs more to feed the hog than it does for farmers to profet off of there hogs. The demand for hogs and pork is on the rise. Soybean prices are also on the rise and are being shipped across the world from the U.S. The price for soybeans per bushel is about $13.50. The shortage of feed to the hogs is causing them to fall short of slaughter weights. Eventually slaughter weights will tell us if producers are falling behind on marketings or if the weekly slaughter declin points to a true shortage of hogs on the ground.

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Technology will play a large role in agriculture's future

Technology will play a large role in agriculture's future | Agriculture | Scoop.it

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Technology will be the critical aspect that drives producers to meet the demand of the future. So said Dr. John Fulton, an expert in applying technology to agriculture, to farm media gathered at the annual John Deere new product introduction event here. Fulton, associate professor at Auburn University and Extension specialist in the Biosystems Engineering Department, said agricultural production will need to double by 2050 and, once the math is done, precision ag technology will contribute at least 30 percent to that production growth. 

In his remarks, he listed three components that are critical to getting the most from the technology that is so rapidly developing:

*Efficient use of the machinery, or input stewardship;

*Environmental constraints that are being placed on agriculture; and

*Management of all the data that has been collected.

"We have spent 20 years getting technology into our farmers' hands, now we are on the cusp of trying to get that data in a form to best serve our farmers so they can be profitable," Fulton said.

Big data- Fulton referred to the term "Big Data" as the collection of all of the bits of information that have been accumulated by ag technology over the past few years that often seems to be unmanageable. And to add even more information to that pile, ag technology has now arrived at a point where we are talking about a certain amount of information coming from an individual plant.

Using corn as an example, he said ag technology is now looking at each individual seed; how that seed is oriented when it's placed in the ground; how accurately can the producer control the planting depth; how accurately can the producer control each individual row unit on how it might impact that seed; and then following that seed through the growing process.

"We're not to that point today, but that's how we are thinking. Each individual seed has tremendous value to a farmer," he explained. "It used to be I am buying a bag of seed, but today we are talking about buying seed and looking at the cost of each individual seed."

And this is where Big Data comes into play. An acre of corn is capable of producing about 26 megabytes per year, when seed attributes, weather, environmental and soil conditions data are added into the situation.

Big machinery- Another factor that needs to be considered, especially in recent years, is big machinery. Fulton made reference to a 120-foot planter made by Deere that requires a large amount of technology to do the right job. From using guidance systems to plot the track of the planter, to on-board technology that allows each planter unit to place the seed exactly where it is wanted, despite the changes in terrain across the width of the planter.

"This technology is very sophisticated," he said as he showed a video of sons of a Nebraska farm family, ages 11 and 13, who were planting corn with this planter. In fact, they planted a significant amount of the crop this year and were operating the most important piece of equipment on the farm; since Fulton feels planting is the most critical operation performed in the crop year.

"That starts everything, that establishes where we will eventually end up on the yield," he said. "In the past we used to talk about a single planter being pulled through the field. But in this case we are actually talking about 48 planters on a single tool bar that we are going to operate independently."

This past winter Fulton surveyed farmers across the Midwest and South, asking just one question: what are the five biggest hurdles to data management at the farm level? By far the number one challenge in data management was automatic data transfer. In most cases that data remains on the machine and is never sent to the farm office, or other sites where the data can be analyzed and used to make future decisions.

The second most mentioned obstacle was the fact that growers need help. "They don't know where to get started and it's a culture change in some respect," he said. "Many don't see how the data is accumulated."

Thirdly, the need for software was mentioned. Surprisingly, Fulton noted, the one thing that was never mentioned by those surveyed was data privacy. "No one ever wrote back, from a farmer's perspective, and asked about who owns the data or data privacy," he said, "and I thought that was pretty interesting.

"I think what we have here is some education to understand from the farmer's perspective, that sharing data, sharing it with the right people and having ownership of that data is first and foremost."

Fulton, whose precision ag research focuses on dry and liquid applicators along with planters, also noted that if this data can be presented to a farmer in a visualized form, it will be easier to understand and address the issues that they see more easily.

"We have to have personalized solutions. We have a lot of famers out there and for them to be engaged not only do they have to trust their dealer, their consultant, their ag retailer ... but they have to feel like they are being given personalized solutions," he said. "We know neighbors don't farm similarly and so they want something that is personalized. And I think we will get through that gate and get over some of these hurdles we have."


Via Stéphane Bisaillon
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alex barnett's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:54 AM

How amazing is it that technology can be applied to just about anything now. Modern technology has advanced dramatically. 

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Farmer Style (Gangnam Style Parody)

Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/petersonfarmbros T-Shirts and Online Store: http://thepetersonfarmbros.bigcartel.com Twitter: @gregpeterson33 @npete16...
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10 Big Trends for Agriculture

10 Big Trends for Agriculture | Agriculture | Scoop.it

I’ve got a number of keynotes coming up in the New Year focused on the agricultural sector, and have done quite a few in the past.

My insight resonates with the agricultural crowd, whether farmers, ranchers, or agricultural support and bio-science companies. I recently spoke to the top 100 cattle, stockyard and feedlot operators in the US at a private event in Sonoma County, California. The US Farm Credit Cooperative has brought me in twice. Want to think about opportunity? Read the post, Agriculture 2020! Innovation, Growth & Opportunity — and also read on below.

Massive growth in food demand: The UK Food and Agriculture Association estimates that the world population will increase 47%, to 8.9 billion, by 2050. That’s a potentially huge food marketplace. That fact, more than anything, spells the reality that the agricultural industry is full of potential opportunity!A continuing rampup in efficiency: Simple fact: global agriculture must double in the next 30 years to sustain this type of population growth. Add this reality check: there is little new arable land in the world. The result is that existing producers will have to continue to focus on smarter, better, more efficient growing in order to meeting demand.Hyper-science: One of the realities of the infinite idea loop in which we now find ourselves is this: while there are 19 million known chemical substances today, the number is constantly doubling every 13 years… with some 80 million by 2025, and 5 billion by 2100. Science is evolving at a furious pace, and with science at the root of agriculture, we will continue to see constant, relentless new methods of improving crop and livestock yield.Innovation defines success: Growers that focus on innovation as a core value will find success; their innovation will focus on the triple-feature need for growth, efficiency and ingestion of new science. It will be by adopting new methodologies, products, partnerships and ideas that they will learn to thrive.Retail and packaging innovation drive agricultural decisions: Do this: stare at a banana. Did you know that Chiquita banana has come up with a special membrane that doubles the shelf-life of the product, doing this regulating the flow of gases through the packaging? Take a look at Naturepops: each lollipop is wrapped in fully bio-degradable film made from plant matter, and the bags they come in are made from recycled paper, water-based ink and poly lactic acid made from cornstarch. There’s a huge amount of innovation happening with packaging companies and on the store shelf, and all of these trends have a big impact on agriculture.Intelligent packaging moves front and center: Innovation with packaging will take an even bigger leap in years to come, and will involve hyperconnectivity, a trend that will be driven by food safety, tracability, country of origin and nutrition labelling needs. Our lives are soon to be transformed by packaging that can “connect” to the global data grid that surrounds us; and its’ role will have been transformed from being that of a “container of product” to an intelligent technology that will help us with use of the product, or which will help us address safety and tracability issues.The energy opportunity: Agriculture is set to play a huge role as we wean ourselves away from our dependence on oil and natural gas. The US Department of Energy plans to see alternative fuels provide 5% of the nations energy by 2020, up from 1% today. And it is expected that there will be $1.2 billion in new income for farmers and rural landowners by getting involved with new energy sources such as windpower. Europe plans to have a market that involves at least 20% usage of bio-fuels by 2020, and Feed & Grain estimates that liquid fuels from agricultural feed could replace 25% to 30% of US petroleum imports by that time.Convenience and health take center stage: We will continue to see rapid change in consumer taste and expectations as people comes to place more emphasis or doing their best with the little time that they have. For example, it is expected that fresh-cut snacks grew from an $8.8 billion market in 2003 to $10.5 billion by 2004, according to the International Fresh-Cut Produce Association, as part of a trend in which produce and fruit continue to compete with traditional snacks. Expect such unique trends to growth both in terms of number and rapidity.Direct consumer-producer relationships blossom: As this technology evolves and as people become more concerned about the safety of what they eat, a natural result is a frenetic rate of growth in direct relationships between growers and consumers. Check out SouthDakotaCertifiedBeef– that type of thing defines the future of this trend!Generational transformation: perhaps the biggest trend is that we are about to witness a sea-change in the rate by which new ideas in the world of agriculture are accepted, as a new generation of technology-weaned, innovative younger people take over the family farm.Partnership defines success: If there is one trend I emphasize in every industry I’m involved with, it is that no one individual or organization can know everything there is to know. As I indicated in my I found the future in manure article, this trend is also becoming prevalent in agriculture. We will continue to see an increasing number of partnerships between growers and advisers, suppliers, buyers, retailers and just about everyone else, so that they learn to deal with the massive complexities that emerge from rapid change and innovation.


Via Giri Kumar
Loran Sneller's insight:

In the year 2050 the world population will increase 47%, to 8.9 billion. Global agriculture must double in the next 30 years to sustain this type of population growth.The result is that existing producers will have to continue to focus on smarter, better, more efficient growing in order to meeting demand.One of the realities of the infinite idea loop in which we now find ourselves is this: while there are 19 million known chemical substances today, the number is constantly doubling every 13 years… with some 80 million by 2025, and 5 billion by 2100. There’s a huge amount of innovation happening with packaging companies and on the store shelf, and all of these trends have a big impact on agriculture.

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Jazz VanHemert's comment, September 27, 2013 10:36 AM
I think this should be very concerning to people because if we don't have enough food for everyone. There could be big problems if there isn't enough food. Hopefully with new technology we can figure out a way to prevent that.
amagazinecalledbible's curator insight, October 1, 2013 7:25 AM

#windpower #sustainabledevelopment #renewable

Lydia Dingeman's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:09 PM

This artical is about how the world population is going to increace by 43% by 2050. Agriculture needs to become more efficant in order to keep up with the poplaustion groth of the world.

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Urban agriculture: The potential and challenges of producing food in cities

Urban agriculture: The potential and challenges of producing food in cities | Agriculture | Scoop.it

Chicago IL (SPX) Sep 20, 2013 -
As the concept of local food and urban gardening gains popularity, urban agriculture, with its benefits and obstacles, is coming to many cities. The issues surrounding food production in urban areas are outlined in a paper recently published by Wortman and Sarah Taylor Lovell in the September-October issue of Journal of Environmental Quality.


Via SustainOurEarth
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