Agriculture and the Natural World
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Agriculture and the Natural World
This is an exploration of agriculture and how it relates to the environment.  Whether you call it agroecology or eco-agriculture or permaculture these all offer alternative approaches to industrial agriculture that are far more sustainable. This page will highlight good, bad and neutral news related to environmental, economical and socially sustainable agriculture.  
Curated by Darin Hoagland
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Rescooped by Darin Hoagland from FoodHub Las Vegas
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The Next Trend In Landscape Design: Foodscapes


Via Rick Passo
Darin Hoagland's insight:

Facinating, attractive and delicious idea explored through academic study.

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Rick Passo's curator insight, August 15, 2013 10:54 AM

http://www.aila.org.au/lapapers/papers/transform/docs/Zuenert.pdf

The Next Trend In Landscape Design: Foodscapes

http://www.sustainablebusiness.com/index.cfm/go/news.display/id/25081# ;

 

As food security becomes a bigger issue, landscape designers are being encouraged to change their focus from aesthetics to edible fruits and vegetables.

Dubbed "Aesthetic Foodscape Design," it asks designers to look beyond aesthetics, which usually consists of ornamental plants to those that can also bring food sources to the center of their practice.  

Food security is a very real concern around the world, so why doesn't it feature more prominently in the landscapes spreading over our public spaces and civic properties, asks Joshua Zeunert, a member of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects who is a big proponent of this idea.

Rescooped by Darin Hoagland from 100 Acre Wood
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Living Fences: How-To, Advantages and Tips - Modern Homesteading - MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Living Fences: How-To, Advantages and Tips - Modern Homesteading - MOTHER EARTH NEWS | Agriculture and the Natural World | Scoop.it

Your first choice for such a multifunctional homestead necessity may be manufactured fencing: woven or electric wire, welded livestock panels, boards on pressure-treated posts, or even virgin or recycled plastic. As the energy and environmental crises deepen, however, such options are becoming less appealing and more expensive. The chemical preservatives, paints and galvanizing agents used in fence manufacturing and maintenance may have toxic spillover effects in the environment. Furthermore, most manufactured fencing is a “one for one” solution. A woven wire fence meant to contain livestock, for example, provides that service and nothing more. The key to a more self-sufficient homestead that imitates natural systems is finding solutions that simultaneously solve more than one problem, provide more than one service and support more than one project. Enter living fences. Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/living-fences-z10m0sto.aspx#ixzz2Xv2ZmfKE


Via David Rowing
Darin Hoagland's insight:

Think hedgerows instead of artificial fencing.

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