Agricultural Biodiversity
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Agricultural Biodiversity
Genetic and species diversity of crops, trees, livestock, pets, fish, pollinators, microbes etc etc...
Curated by Luigi Guarino
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Agricultural Technology, Crop Income, and Poverty Alleviation in Uganda - Kassie &al (2011) - World Development

Agricultural Technology, Crop Income, and Poverty Alleviation in Uganda - Kassie &al (2011) - World Development | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

This paper evaluates the ex post impact of adopting improved groundnut varieties on crop income and poverty in rural Uganda. The study utilizes cross-sectional data of 927 households, collected in 2006, from seven districts in Uganda. Using propensity score matching methods, we find that adopting improved groundnut varieties (technology) significantly increases crop income and reduces poverty. The positive and significant impact on crop income is consistent with the perceived role of new agricultural technologies in reducing rural poverty through increased farm household income. This study supports broader investment in agriculture research to address vital development challenges. Reaching the poor with better technologies however requires policy support for improving extension efforts, access to seeds and market outlets that simulate adoption.


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Gene Bank Research Back On Track in Post-Conflict Côte-d'Ivoire

Gene Bank Research Back On Track in Post-Conflict Côte-d'Ivoire | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

Gene Bank Research Back On Track in Post-Conflict Côte-d'IvoireAllAfrica.comBy Théodore Kouadio, 4 April 2012 Abidjan — A national project to rebuild Côte-d'Ivoire's capacity to store crop seeds and safeguard agricultural genetic resources is getting...

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Local Food of Nongtraw Village

video project initiated and funded by the Indigenous Partnership for Agrobiodiversity and Food Sovereignty.
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Invest in crop variety - Fiji Times

Invest in crop varietyFiji Times"Changes in temperature, rainfall, loss of agro-biodiversity, saltwater intrusion, extreme weather-related natural disasters and changes in pest and disease regimes will have severe repercussions for agricultural production,"...
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Ghanaian women gain from roots and tubers

With a special emphasis on women, IFAD's Root and Tuber Improvement and Marketing Programme is working to improve the food security and incomes of poor rural households in Ghana by enhancing production of roots and tubers through improved...
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Poverty and food: The nutrition puzzle

Poverty and food: The nutrition puzzle | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

Why do so many people in poor countries eat so badly—and what can be done about it?... Even where there is enough food, people do not seem healthier. On top of 1 billion without enough calories, another 1 billion are malnourished in the sense that they lack micro-nutrients (this is often called “hidden hunger”). And a further 1 billion are malnourished in the sense that they eat too much and are obese. It is a damning record: out of the world population of 7 billion, 3 billion eat too little, too unhealthily, or too much. Malnutrition is attracting attention now because the damage it does has only recently begun to sink in. The misery of lacking calories—bloated bellies, wasted limbs, the lethargy of famine—is easy to spot. So are the disastrous effects of obesity. By contrast, the ravages of inadequate nutrition are veiled, but no less dreadful.


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Wu Weiyang's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:40 AM

There is plenty of food in the world for everyone. The problem is that hungry people are trapped in severe poverty. They lack the money to buy enough food to nourish them. Being constantly malnourished, they become weaker and often sick. This makes them increasingly less able to work, which then makes them even poorer and hungrier. This downward spiral often continues until death for them and their families. Many people are trying to help them problem is still remain unsolved.by donating daily necessaries. However, these things can only last for a short while, the main problem is still remain unsolved. Once they finished the things we donated, how are they going to survive?

 

Poon Ying Ying's curator insight, February 4, 2013 7:15 AM

In this article, we can see that the poor are having difficulty eating proper meals. People living in poverty are starving or malnourished, they do not get enough calories and nutrition from the food they consume or even die from diseases because they consume leftover food found in the bins which are unhygienic and contaminated. We have easy access to food everyday and everywhere, but we are not appreciating it. We tend to waste food and complain about the food we eat. That is not the way, we should think of those living in poverty and spare a thought for them. They have to consume unhygienic food or even starve, when we get to consume the clean food of enough nutrition. I wonder how can we waste food at the thought of those living in poverty? How can this people survive on contaminated food everyday?

Jasmine Tan's curator insight, March 2, 2013 12:36 PM

See. Think. Wonder.

From this article, I can see that children are suffering from the lack of food. In some countries, the children starve for almost the whole day and they will only get food if they come to school. Starving is bad for their health and they will suffer from different malnutrition symptoms in the long run if they do not treat the probolem of lack of food seirously now.

It gets me thinking of the amount of children who die each day because they cannot take the hunger, and die of some diesease or just plainly starvation, although in some countries, food is nothing important to the people because food is taken for granted.

I wonder how will the children feel about their lives, if they knew that they are leading worse lives than those who are more fortunate than them. Would they feel that it is unfair? or are they just contented with what they have?

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Assessing the Rise of Organic Farming in the European Union: Environmental and Socio­ economic Consequences - Konstantinidis (2012) - Univ Mass

Although organic farming is considered the poster child of rural development in Europe, there is little empirical evidence assessing its success in achieving the ambitious environmental and socio-economic objectives that it is purported to assist. This paper presents empirical evidence from the growth of organic farming in Europe over the past two decades that questions the highly optimistic claims of policy makers. Although policies in support of organic impact have had an overall positive environmental impact, their social impact is ambiguous, as organic farming appears to have grown more in areas with larger average farm sizes. Additionally, contrary to what is often assumed, organic farms in Europe display larger average sizes and lower rates of labor intensity than their conventional counterparts, casting doubts on the ecacy of organic farms to allow family farmers to remain in the countryside as high-value producers. I assert that this this development should be viewed as evidence of the "conventionalization" of organic farming, and suggest that policy makers take into account the transformations of the structures of production, which bene t from the support for organic farming. Treating the experience of organic farmers in the EU as a lesson for schemes paying for environmental services, I suggest that the success of organic farming should be evaluated by the numbers of participating farmers, rather than by area covered, as has been the predominant approach so far. Finally, I assert that strong agricultural cooperatives are necessary to secure a long-lasting passage of small farmers to organic methods of production.


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Landscape of the week

Landscape of the week | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
A blog on landscapes selected the Kuk Early Agricultural World Heritage Site as its landscape of the week.
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Mulberry: HIMALAYAN

Mulberry: HIMALAYAN | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
3Point141 has added a photo to the pool:
Himalayan Mulberries in various stages of ripeness, resting on a leaf. High yield, sweet, 4-inch (10 cm) long fruits ripen in the spring.
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Mufhoho for the masses, finger millet for the rest of us

Mufhoho for the masses, finger millet for the rest of us | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
The Gaia Foundation recently featured a slideshow about the work of the Mupo Foundation. The slideshow is all about finger millet (Eleusine coracana) in Venda, a region of South Africa.
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Invest in crop variety - Fiji Times

Invest in crop varietyFiji Times"Changes in temperature, rainfall, loss of agro-biodiversity, saltwater intrusion, extreme weather-related natural disasters and changes in pest and disease regimes will have severe repercussions for agricultural...
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Africa: Unsustainable Harvesting of Prunus Africana Tree Threatens Treatment ... - AllAfrica.com

Africa: Unsustainable Harvesting of Prunus Africana Tree Threatens Treatment ... - AllAfrica.com | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
AllAfrica.comAfrica: Unsustainable Harvesting of Prunus Africana Tree Threatens Treatment ...AllAfrica.comThe World Agroforestry Centre is doing its part preserving these trees and shrubs by holding samples of most of the species with medicinal qualities...
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Moroccan wheat additions to the global genepool

There are times when the whole social media buzz conversation engagement thang is a bit overwhelming. Like today.
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Food for thought, chemical fertilizers in Africa - Gilbert (2012) - Nature

Food for thought, chemical fertilizers in Africa - Gilbert (2012) - Nature | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

Chemical fertilizers get a bad press, with some justification. Their use can pollute water supplies and generate significant greenhouse-gas emissions. But they are an excellent way to boost crop yields: they help to grow food. And in sub-Saharan Africa that means they can help to fill empty bellies and save lives. Parts of Africa sorely need that help. Across the continent, agricultural lands are characterized by red soil that is low in nutrients. Intensive farming has seen the typical hectare of sub-Saharan farmland lose 22kilograms of nitrogen, 2.5 kg of phosphorus and 15 kg of potassium annually over the past 30 years. Impoverished African farmers cannot afford to wait for the international community to deliberate on the long-term, green methods needed for a sustainable global agricultural system. They need to deploy methods that work now — and that means that in the short term, they need access to chemical fertilizers. But there lies the problem. Most of the Malawian farmers interviewed for the Feature on page 525, for example, said that their biggest problem is the high cost and poor supply of fertilizer. Although this evidence is anecdotal, it hints at something more. Farming a smallholding is intensive, backbreaking work that, for the most part, is done out of necessity, not choice. Greener practices such as no-till farming may be cheaper than using fertilizer, but they are less efficient and lack appeal because they add to farmers' already hard labour. By contrast, the quick and easy gains of fertilizers free up farmers' time, and can turn a subsistence existence into a commercial operation, offering a potential way to escape the crushing cycle of poverty... 


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Noah's cider ark - This is Somerset

Noah's cider ark - This is Somerset | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Noah's cider arkThis is SomersetScientists from Copenhagen University have visited West Bradley Orchards, near Glastonbury, as part of their work with the Nordic Gene Bank.
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Farm-fresh infringement: Can you violate a patent by planting some seeds?

Farm-fresh infringement: Can you violate a patent by planting some seeds? | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
One farmer argues that when Monsanto sells a seed, farmers are free to do as they please with it—and its descendants. Monsanto claims patent infringement. The Supreme Court may decide.
Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
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Conservation and Use of Agrobiodiversity in Semi-Arid Tropic ...

Conservation and Use of Agrobiodiversity in Semi-Arid Tropic ... | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Gowda, C L L and Upadhyaya, H D and Sharma, Shivali (2010) Conservation and Use of Agrobiodiversity in Semi-Arid Tropic Regions. Documentation. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics, ...
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Two things about agricultural biodiversity

If the point of a good blog post is to get you thinking, Alan Cann’s over at the Annals of Botany blog certainly worked on me. What are the two things you need to know about a subject?
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Five ways to tackle disastrous diets – UN food expert

Five ways to tackle disastrous diets – UN food expert | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

“Our food systems are making people sick,” warned Olivier De Schutter, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food, on Tuesday. “One in seven people globally are undernourished, and many more suffer from the 'hidden hunger' of micronutrient deficiency, while 1.3 billion are overweight or obese. Faced with this public health crisis, we continue to prescribe medical remedies: nutrition pills and early-life nutrition strategies for those lacking in calories; slimming pills, lifestyle advice and calorie counting for the overweight. But we must tackle the systemic problems that generate poor nutrition in all its forms,” the independent expert said as he presented his report on nutrition to the UN Human Rights Council. “The right to food means not only access to an adequate quantity of food, but also the ability to have a balanced and nutritious diet,” Mr. De Schutter underlined. “Governments must not abstain from their responsibility to secure this right.” Mr. De Schutter identified five priority actions for placing nutrition at the heart of food systems in the developed and developing world: taxing unhealthy products; regulating foods high in saturated fats, salt and sugar; cracking down on junk food advertising; overhauling misguided agricultural subsidies that make certain ingredients cheaper than others; and supporting local food production so that consumers have access to healthy, fresh and nutritious foods.


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From Three Continents: Black-Eyed Peas in Mexico

From Three Continents: Black-Eyed Peas in Mexico | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
This morning’s post is for those obessionistas like me who can’t resist digging into the strange and multiple paths along which people have taken plants, in this case the black-eyed pea (aka the cow pea or Vigna unguiculata).
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The Japanese as a Wheat-Eating Nation

The Japanese as a Wheat-Eating Nation | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Sorry, folks.  I hit the publish on this before I meant to.  In any case an interesting story in Slate.  I’d actually put the beginnings of the Japanese move to wheat at the beginning of the twentieth century.  That established the idea that wheat...
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Diversity in Allium ampeloprasum: from small and wild to large and cultivated

Diversity in Allium ampeloprasum: from small and wild to large and cultivated | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Abstract  
Allium ampeloprasum evolved as a complex of different cyto- and morpho-types widely distributed either in the wild or domesticated range of the
Mediterranean regions.
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It’s all in the name - conserving bananas in the Pacific region

It’s all in the name - conserving bananas in the Pacific region | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Collecting banana diversity is more than just a matter of knowing which accessions (samples) to conserve. Ongoing work in French Polynesia is showing that diversity is not just found in genetic traits, but also the different names given to varieties.
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Phytopathology: The Genus Phytophthora Anno 2012

Phytopathology: The Genus Phytophthora Anno 2012 | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

Plant diseases caused by Phytophthora species will remain an ever increasing threat to agriculture and natural ecosystems. Phytophthora literally means plant destroyer, a name coined in the 19th century by Anton de Bary when he investigated the potato disease that set the stage for the Great Irish Famine. Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato late blight, was the first species in a genus that at present has over 100 recognized members. In the last decade, the number of recognized Phytophthora species has nearly doubled and new species are added almost on a monthly basis. Here we present an overview of the 10 clades that are currently distinguished within the genus Phytophthora with special emphasis on new species that have been described since 1996 when Erwin and Ribeiro published the valuable monograph ‘Phytophthora diseases worldwide’ (35).


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Bioversity International 2012-2021 Strategic Priorities and Research ...

Bioversity International 2012-2021 Strategic Priorities and Research ... | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Bioversity International has recently published its strategic priorities and research agenda for the decade 2012 to 2021. Bioversity International is the only global non-profit research organization that places the use and ...
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