Agricultural Biodiversity
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Saina for genetic conservation of plants to fight poverty - Hindu Business Line

Saina for genetic conservation of plants to fight poverty Hindu Business Line “ICRISAT's RS Paroda Genebank is a treasure trove of genes useful to crop improvement for sustainable food production and improved livelihoods, particularly in marginal...
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Agricultural Biodiversity
Genetic and species diversity of crops, trees, livestock, fish, pollinators, microbes etc etc
Curated by Luigi Guarino
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Screening old peppers (Capsicum spp.) for disease resistance and pungency-related traits

Screening old peppers (Capsicum spp.) for disease resistance and pungency-related traits https://t.co/PCccmqL9z9 @AgroBioDiverse
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The Slow Loss of Endangered Foods - Food and Recipes - Mother Earth Living

The Slow Loss of Endangered Foods - Food and Recipes - Mother Earth Living | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Learn how a lack of agricultural biodiversity is causing dietary issues, and threatens the disappearance of our favorite foods.
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Human management and hybridization shape treegourd fruits in the Brazilian Amazon Basin

Human management and hybridization shape treegourd fruits in the Brazilian Amazon Basin | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Local people's perceptions of cultivated and wild agrobiodiversity, as well as their management of hybridization are still understudied in Amazonia. Here we analyze domesticated treegourd (Crescenti
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Agricultural death spiral

Based on our projections, the world will need only 25 percent to 70 percent more crop output in 2050 than was produced in 2014. This includes grain used to feed livestock and, to some extent, grain used for ethanol production.
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DOI guidelines are open for comment

The Secretariat of the International Treaty is pleased to invite Contracting Parties and Stakeholders to provide comments for the update of the Guidelines for the optimal use of Digital Object Identifiers as permanent unique identifiers for germplasm samples – v.2
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India’s seed-saving farmers who pass down land to their daughters

India’s seed-saving farmers who pass down land to their daughters | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
In north-east India's mountainous state of Meghalaya, youngest daughters inherit the land – and the ancient food heritage of their mothers
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The evolutionary origin of plant and animal microRNAs

The evolutionary origin of plant and animal microRNAs | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
miRNAs are crucial regulators of normal development in plants and animals, but their origins remain obscure.

Via Jean-Pierre Zryd
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Mainstreaming agrobiodiversity in sustainable food systems: scientific foundations for an agrobiodiversity index - Summary

Mainstreaming agrobiodiversity in sustainable food systems: scientific foundations for an agrobiodiversity index - Summary | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
We need to change how we grow!
Mainstreaming agrobiodiversity in sustainable food systems: scientific foundations https://t.co/h3xOXpRiKY
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Agro-biodiversity has increased over a 95 year period at sub-regional and regional scales in southern Quebec, Canada - IOPscience

Agro-biodiversity has increased over a 95 year period at sub-regional and regional scales in southern Quebec, Canada - IOPscience | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

Via MJ Chappell
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Subsistence mosaics, forager-farmer interactions, and the transition to food production in eastern Africa

Subsistence mosaics, forager-farmer interactions, and the transition to food production in eastern Africa | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
The spread of agriculture across sub-Saharan Africa has long been attributed to the large-scale migration of Bantu-speaking groups out of their west Central African homeland from about 4000 years ago. These groups are seen as having expanded rapidly across the sub-continent, carrying an ‘Iron Age’ package of farming, metal-working, and pottery, and largely replacing pre-existing hunter-gatherers along the way. While elements of the ‘traditional’ Bantu model have been deconstructed in recent years, one of the main constraints on developing a more nuanced understanding of the local processes involved in the spread of farming has been the lack of detailed archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological sequences, particularly from key regions such as eastern Africa. Situated at a crossroads between continental Africa and the Indian Ocean, eastern Africa was not only a major corridor on one of the proposed Bantu routes to southern Africa, but also the recipient of several migrations of pastoral groups from the north. In addition, eastern Africa saw the introduction of a range of domesticates from India, Southeast Asia, and other areas of the Indian Ocean sphere through long-distance maritime connections. The possibility that some Asian crops, such as the vegecultural ‘tropical trio’ (banana, taro, and yam), arrived before the Bantu expansion has in particular raised many questions about the role of eastern Africa's nonagricultural communities in the adoption and subsequent diffusion of crops across the continent. Drawing on new botanical and faunal evidence from recent excavations at a range of hunter-gatherer and early farming sites on eastern Africa's coast and offshore islands, and with comparison to inland sites, this paper will examine the timing and tempo of the agricultural transition, the nature of forager-farmerpastoralist interactions, and the varying roles that elements of the ‘Bantu package’, pastoralism, and nonAfrican domesticates played in local economies. This paper highlights the complex pathways and transitions that unfolded, as well as how eastern Africa links into a broader global picture of heterogeneous, dynamic, and extended transformations from forager to farmer that challenge our fundamental understanding of pre-modern Holocene societies

Via Dorian Q Fuller, Eve Emshwiller
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8A ArnonP's curator insight, March 13, 11:49 AM
This article is about the spread of argiculture in Africa. The spread of agriculture across sub-Saharan Africa was cause by the large-scale migration of Bantu-speaking groups out of their homeland in west Central Africa about 4,000 years ago, this is called the Bantu expansion. The Bantus explaned rapidly across the sub-continent, carrying packages for farming, metal-working, and potter, and largely replacing pre-exxisting hunter-gatheres along the way. While the elements of the Bantu model have been analyzed in recent years, one of the main problem the limit the developing a better understanding of the spread of farming. Situated at a corssroads between continental Africa and the Indian Ocean, eastern Africa was not only a major corridor on of the proposed Bantu routes to southern Africa, it was also a recipient of several migrations of groups of farmer from the north.
This article help me understand about Africa by telling me about the Bantu expansion that caused a large group of farmers to migrate from West Africa to southern Africa. This also help me understand African was advanced because 4,000 years ago, they had stuff for farming, metal-working, and pottery. I think that this topic is still a mystery because know one exactly know what caused the Bantu to migrate to souther Africa.  
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Peering at pea data

In Europe, agriculture is highly dependent on imported soybean from South America. Potential alternative sources are protein from peas (Pisum sativum L.) or more local sources like other grain legumes or rapeseed meal (Brassica napus L. subsp. oliefera [sic]). These
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Local Knowledge, Methods, and Manioc Landraces | Anthropology-News

Local Knowledge, Methods, and Manioc Landraces - https://t.co/K2HC0rLnMc
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Africa’s untapped goldmine of food biodiversity

Africa’s untapped goldmine of food biodiversity | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
The sustainability of agrobiodiversity is vital in meeting the food and nutrition needs of present and the future generations in Africa
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Multi-sector inputs towards a solid Agrobiodiversity Index prototype

Multi-sector inputs towards a solid Agrobiodiversity Index prototype | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Last week company, country and investor representatives gathered to consult on the Agrobiodiversity Index – a tool to measure and manage agrobiodiversity across four dimensions: nutrition, production, seed systems and conservation.
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Patterns of Commoning: The Potato Park of Peru | P2P Foundation

Patterns of Commoning: The Potato Park of Peru | P2P Foundation | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
The Potato Park preserves and promotes native potato varieties and protecs the fragile ecosystem by recognizing the role of indigenous biocultural heritage
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Rethinking the approach to viability monitoring in seed genebanks | Conservation Physiology | Oxford Academic

Rethinking the approach to viability monitoring in seed genebanks | Conservation Physiology | Oxford Academic | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
RT @AgroBioDiverse: Rethinking the approach to viability monitoring in seed #genebanks https://t.co/tDhOrvhzN6 @RiceResearch @CGIAR
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Vegetable life on Mars

“Much to our surprise, despite the soil’s high salinity, two of the 75 potato breeds we had brought in were able to produce tubers in this soil. It was inspiring news to all of us,” Dr. Valdivia-Silva said. That would
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Launch of the 14th year of the International PhD Programme in Agrobiodiversity | Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research

Launch of the 14th year of the International PhD Programme in Agrobiodiversity | Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Launch of the 14th year of the International PhD Programme in Agrobiodiversity https://t.co/GAgEyRLrzW #agrobiodiversity https://t.co/rDwdBIdNpa
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Sweet day

On this fine day, meet Dr Janaki Ammal… By manipulating polyploid cells through cross-breeding of hybrids in the laboratory, Janaki was able to create a high yielding strain of the sugarcane that would thrive in Indian conditions. Her research also
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Women are the undeniable protectors of the biodiversity - North East Slow Food & Agrobiodiversity Society

Women are the undeniable protectors of the biodiversity - North East Slow Food & Agrobiodiversity Society | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Women traditionally play a central role in any indigenous communities. NESFAS highlights the role of women as custodians of our agrobiodiversity and foodways. Today, March 8th marks the 106th anniversary of Women’s Day across the globe and for the indigenous … Continue reading →
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Want more crop variety? Researchers propose using CRISPR to accelerate plant domestication - Science Daily (2017) 

Want more crop variety? Researchers propose using CRISPR to accelerate plant domestication - Science Daily (2017)  | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

Out of the more than 300,000 plant species in existence, only three species -- rice, wheat, and maize -- account for most of the plant matter that humans consume, partly because in the history of agriculture, mutations arose that made these crops the easiest to harvest. But with CRISPR technology, we don't have to wait for nature to help us domesticate plants... 


Gene editing could make, for example, wild legumes, quinoa, or amaranth, which are already sustainable and nutritious, more farmable. "In theory, you can now take those traits that have been selected for over thousands of years of crop domestication -- such as reduced bitterness and those that facilitate easy harvest -- and induce those mutations in plants that have never been cultivated"... 

The approach has already been successful in accelerating domestication of undervalued crops using less precise gene-editing methods. For example, researchers used chemical mutagenesis to induce random mutations in weeping rice grass... to make it more likely to hold onto its seeds after ripening. And in wild field cress... scientists silenced genes with RNA interference involved with fatty acid synthesis, resulting in improved seed oil quality.

"All of the plants we eat today are mutants, but the crops we have now were selected for over thousands of years, and their mutations arose by chance... With gene editing, we can create 'biologically inspired organisms' in that we don't want to improve nature, we want to benefit from what nature has already created."

This strategy also has potential to address problems related to pesticide use and the impact of large-scale agriculture on the environment. For example, runoff from excess nitrogen in fertilizers is a common pollutant; however, wild legumes, through symbiosis with bacteria, can turn nitrogen available in the atmosphere into their own fertilizer. "Why not try to domesticate more of these plants?" ... 


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170302133427.htm

 

Underlying article: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2017.01.004



Via Alexander J. Stein
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Tea: A Coffee Drinker's Guide, Food Programme - BBC Radio 4

Tea: A Coffee Drinker's Guide, Food Programme - BBC Radio 4 | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it

A radio program on tea: including a discussion of the archaeobotany.


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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A Sardinian grasspea is recognized

A Sardinian grasspea is recognized | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Congratulations to the Italian company Sa Laurera for receiving the 2016 Arca Deli Award for its Sardinian grasspea variety Inchixa. In 2016, the SAVE Foundation announced the Arca Deli Award which is dedicated to products derived from the cultivation of
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Agricultural biodiversity key to future crop improvement | CIMMYT. International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center

Agricultural biodiversity key to future crop improvement | CIMMYT. International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center | Agricultural Biodiversity | Scoop.it
Conserving and using agricultural biodiversity to create better crops can help meet several sustainable development goals and stave off further species
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