Graphene is thinnest known anti-corrosion coating | Agoria's technology review | Scoop.it

The “miracle material” graphene is the world’s thinnest known coating for protecting metals against corrosion. In the study, Dhiraj Prasai and colleagues point out that rusting and other corrosion of metals is a serious global problem, and intense efforts are underway to find new ways to slow or prevent it. Corrosion results from contact of the metal’s surface with air, water or other substances. One major approach involves coating metals with materials that shield the metal surface, but currently used materials have limitations. The scientists decided to evaluate graphene as a new coating. Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms, many layers of which are in lead pencils and charcoal, and is the thinnest, strongest known material. That’s why it is called the miracle material. In graphene, the carbon atoms are arranged like a chicken-wire fence in a layer so thin that is transparent, and an ounce would cover 28 football fields.

 

Videos about Graphene: http://tinyurl.com/74eelyy

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald