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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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12 Important Trends in the ePortfolio Industry for Education and Learning

12 Important Trends in the ePortfolio Industry for Education and Learning | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"ePortfolios have significantly evolved! New companies, new options.  Learn about important trends in the ePortfolio industry."


Author Trent Batson provides a thorough and informative read on how technology is impacting education, jobs and careers through ePortfolio.  Once a curiousity, it appears now to be a significant force in the education, career building and learning process.  ~  Deb


_____________________________

"The un-tethered learner, the DIY learner, is a new phenomenon: It's the Gap Year taken to a new level..."

_____________________________


Excerpts:


An electronic portfolio belongs to the learner: a Web-based application that can upload and store any file type to serve as evidence such as for graduation or to get a job.


It is thus an electronic record of achievement that can be culled and curated over time. It is a resume-maker with linked evidence.


Trends:


Extensive interviews with 14 ePortfolio vendors revealed 12 intriguing findings.  A sample:


1.  New companies are entering the market:  SchoolChapters, Bedford/St. Martin's and Pathbrite, each is entering this market with realistic expectations as the ePortfolio provider world is less than 20 companies - a significant increase.



2.  Larger implementations. Typical campus implementations have moved to large program rollouts.



4.  Selling to individuals. Until this year, almost all ePortfolio accounts for students were created through an institutions.  Now a couple of companies are primarily or only selling to adult individuals. 



8.  Corporate market interest.   Online self-paced learning may be replacing training and may not be occasional but constant.  To show that an employee is up-to-date, an ePortfolio may be the best tool.



The un-tethered learner, the DIY learner, is a new phenomenon: It's the Gap Year taken to a new level, it's the semester abroad, the year off, the summer experience, the field study--all not as an interlude to "real" learning but as a genuine path to success in life.


ePortfolio providers are there to offer support for this new path. ePortfolios are ideal for the un-tethered learner, both within and without an institutional setting.


Read the full article here.

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Exploring Change Through Ongoing Discussions
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How Did Howard Rheingold Get So “Net Smart”: An Interview (Part One)

How Did Howard Rheingold Get So “Net Smart”: An Interview (Part One) | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Howard Rheingold's progression from work on virtual communities to smart mobs to digital literacies says quite a bit about the evolution of digital culture over the past few decades.


  • Howard Rheingold has been one of the smartest, most forward thinking, most provocative writers about digital culture for the past several decades. 


What has led him to focus on giving everyday people the skills they need to more meaningfully participate in the new media landscape?  Read this post and find out more.




Via jean lievens, janlgordon
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WXW Exchange and Open Space, Room for Introverts & Extroverts

WXW Exchange and Open Space, Room for Introverts & Extroverts | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"If you count introversion as one of your prize attributes, here's my three cents about introversion & extroversion relevant to an Open Space event I'm facilitating at the Women's Exchange of Washtenaw this September."

  

First of all, extroversion & introversion are oversimplified terms, especially through the lens of work of Carl Jung.  Based on Jung, there are levels of understanding including one version, nicely described using the Myers Briggs Type Indicator the MBTI®, a tool to increase access to Jung's work, via Five Levels of Understanding:

  

  • The Five Levels of Understanding™ was created by Katharine Myers, to share her experience of type as a beckoning path of ever deepening knowledge of human behavior and life itself. This is the depth that MBTI type brings.

  

As I posted on the Reveln Consulting Facebook page in July:

  

  • ...using extrovert, introvert to describe a person is like using our known solar system to explain the universe. It's a way to begin, but there's a lot more out there: 
  
  • Using an MBTI approach, those using extroversion gain energy from using it as one of their top two mental functions as a 1st or 2ndary strength. We ALL have a balancing introvert side tied to one of our top two mental functions, based on Jungian theory.
  
  • One of those two mental functions is dominant and one is auxilary, a helper mental function of either perception or judgment.  
   

There's much more here on the nuances of introversion & extroversion via the Personality Pathways website that describes the order of preference using the MBTI.

  

A recent post by blogger and self-identified introvert Maria Ogneva lends itself to a feature of an advantage of Open Space:  choosing when, how and what contribute to a group.  You may chooseto observe, listen in on, or join in full dialog.

  
Read the full post and see all the diagrams & photos here.

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Social Media Learning Lab
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Transliteracy : Constructing Knowledge and Networks, New trends, tech, terms

Transliteracy : Constructing Knowledge and Networks, New trends, tech, terms | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"This hot whiteboard illustration of the nuances of social media is going the distance.  After sharing it on Facebook & Pinterest, it now appears here in a new context, Transliteracy."


Librarians gathered together for a one-day conference on ARLD Day 2012 (27 April) in Minnesota to engage, discuss and connect on the theme “Transliteracy: Constructing Knowledge and Networks and more.


____________________________

   

“Transliteracy is the ability to communicate meaning between media. ...Transliteracy helps us promote literacy across technological barriers.”  

____________________________

     


Lane Wilkinson, Assistant Professor and reference and instruction librarian at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, advocated a new literacy taxonomy in his keynote presentation. Lane shared his views on "What is Transliteracy?


   

See the full presentation with slides & audio, via the original article link here.


Via Sue Thomas, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 24, 2012 3:08 PM
I shared this on Facebook & Pinterest, but it also belongs elsewhere too, obviously. Thanks for the inclusion.
Suggested by Frederic DOMON
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The Stupid Company? Is Collective Intelligence a Myth? Call for papers: The #eCollab Blog Carnival

The Stupid Company?  Is Collective Intelligence a Myth?  Call for papers: The #eCollab Blog Carnival | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

In theory, everyone is for the learning organization or the mobilization of collective intelligence.   How could you be against it? Would that make you in favour of the "stupid organization"?


eCollab Blog Carnival post suggested by Frederic Domon. It looks like a great idea. ~ Deb


Few organizations have developed a model for a sustainable learning organization.


So, is collective intelligence a myth? What are the reasons for successive failures at attempts to implement the learning organization? How can this be fixed?

Please join us in this discussion!

If you wish to participate (2 choices):

Do you have a blog?


  • Respond with an article you publish on your blog. Send an email to fdomon (at) entreprisecollaborative.com or a tweet to @hjarche or @fdomon to make sure we do not forget your article.
 
 
  • If you use Twitter, send a message linked to your post using the hashtag #ecollab
  
  • We will publish all articles, or excerpts of them on the site. This will make for easier reading of the blog carnival. We will link to the original article and will contact you for a short bio and photo to include with the article
  


You do not have a blog but this interests you?

   

Send your article directly to fdomon (at) entreprisecollaborative.com. We will then publish it.
   

Good blog Carnival and thank you in advance for your participation. - Frederic Domon.

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Content Curation World
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Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus

Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Blogging, great content vs. Curation, great topics + great content, AND useful data / content infographic, for your pondering pleasure."


Another great shared curation piece from Robin Good and Deanna Dahlsad at Kitsch-Slapped:


Excerpts:


Robin Good: If curation is all about finding and sharing great content, what's the difference with what so many bloggers have been doing until now?

The difference, according to Deanna Dahlsad at Kitsch-Slapped, is in the focus. While bloggers often cover just about anything that intercepts their online wanderings, curators are characterized by a strong focus on a specific topic.  


Here is a key passage from her article: "Many bloggers spend their time selecting what they consider the best of what other people have created on the web and post it at their own sites, just like a magazine or newspaper.


______________________


Because content curation is expected to be based on such focused filtering, it begins...based on topic selection.

______________________


Or they provide a mix of this along with writing or otherwise creating their own content. Not to split hairs, but curation involves less creation and more searching and sifting; curation’s more a matter of focused filtering than it is writing.


Because content curation is expected to be based on such focused filtering, it begins far more based on topic selection.


This is much different from blogging, where bloggers are often advised to “just begin” and let their voice and interests accumulate over time to eventually reveal a primary theme.


While blogging success may be thought of in many different ways, the success of content curation lies in how well you define, search/research, and stick to your subject."


Rightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/2012/06/facts-questions-on-blogging-curating-collecting/ 


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's comment, June 19, 2012 4:21 PM
Thank you Deanna for writing it!
AnneMarie Cunningham's curator insight, March 14, 2013 2:13 PM

another explanation of curation

Everett Hudson's comment, March 22, 2013 10:50 AM
you have great ideas. more please!
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Content Curation World
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Curating Your Sources Is As Important As Curating Your Content

Curating Your Sources Is As Important As Curating Your Content | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
Yes, it IS about good curation of good content, from good sources that just a repackaging of what's already in the mainstream.
I agree with Robin, along with Gideon Rosenblatt, who I recognize from conversation in Google+.  (His wife and I also do executive coaching.) ~  Deb
_____________________
In the world of the information networker, curating content is only half the game. The other half is curating the curators.

_____________________
Excerpt:
Robin Good: Gideon Rosenblatt has a good article out on his blog Alchemy of Change, explaining how important it is for curators to explore and expand their news and content sources to avoid becoming another megaphone for what everyone else is already sharing.
.

He writes: "...when it comes to networking information, curating content is only half of the problem.

.

The other half is curating people.


When we take the time to build interesting, diverse circles on Google+ or lists on Twitter, we improve the way we filter information. It’s up to us.


We can pursue strategies that concentrate the stream of content into just the same old stuff, or we can go out of our way to increase the diversity – and the quality – of what comes to us.


It’s all in the people we follow.

.

In the world of the information networker, curating content is only half the game. The other half is curating the curators.

.

And in that power to choose our connections, rests our ultimate power to reshape our information filter bubbles and radically improve our perception of reality."

.

Rightful. 8/10


Via Robin Good
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Tom George's comment, June 23, 2012 3:05 PM
Hey Michelle,
Great piece here and so true. We must curate the curators. This belongs on the Billboards can you share it there? I hope all is going well for you.
Michelle Church's comment, June 23, 2012 3:58 PM
I sure will...I meant to earlier really...All is well here. Hope the same is true for you.
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Pros and Cons of Social Media in Education, INFOGRAPHIC > Big Universities today, Disruption Tomorrow?

Pros and Cons of Social Media in Education, INFOGRAPHIC > Big Universities today, Disruption Tomorrow? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Check out the top five schools using social media well, at least today. These are the usual suspects.   ALSO take a look at OmniAcademy and Southern New Hampshire University (profiled in Fast Company.)   These two seem to have more in common in preparing for the disruption in higher education that is already beginning to happen.

Embed the image above on your site Via: Online Universities Blog...


Via Peter Azzopardi
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The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead?

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Is it really about teaching more, in less time, with shrinking budgets?  Or are we doing our brains & our bottom line a disservice, including conference event planning?"  


This is a great post on how to leverage learning that sticks, is sticky, vs. a spray and pray approach that still, unfortunately, dominates training programs and many conference events.


Here's an excerpt of this great post by 


Fresh thinking about how we learn
There are two kinds of learning. Learning physical tasks, like how to snowboard...embedded through repetition in the deeper motor regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia. This is known as procedural memory.


For workplace learning to be useful, we need to be able to recall ideas easily. 


In the last decade, Neuroscientists discovered that whether an idea can be easily recalled is linked to the strength of activation of the hippocampus during a learning task.


Many corporate training programs are the mental equivalent of trying to eat a week of meals in a day.


With this finding, scientists such as Lila Davachi at NYU and others have been able to test out many variables involved in learning experiences, such as what happens to the hippocampus if you distract people while absorbing information.


Over a few months of collaboration, Lila Davachi and I, along with Tobias Keifer, a consultant from Booz & Co., found a useful pattern that summarized the four biggest factors that determined the quality of recall. These are:

  • Attention, 
  • Generation, 
  • Emotion and 
  • Spacing, or the ‘AGES’ model. 

The AGES model was first presented at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit, and then published in the 2010 NeuroLeadership Journal. Read the full post including Learning that lasts through AGES that has a summary of this important research here.


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Capture, Create and Collect: Curate Your Passions into Visual Collections with Kullect

Capture, Create and Collect: Curate Your Passions into Visual Collections with Kullect | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

From Pinterest wildly successful pinboards to a custom mobile tool, like Kullect - with context:  "why people share the things they do, or how they fit into a larger story."

 

Robin Good's summary of Kullect - a mobile publishing tool that allows you to capture, organize and share "collections" about things that interest and inspire you.

 

Excerpted:

From Xconomy: "Open up any of today’s top mobile media-sharing networks on your smartphone—like Instagram or Picplz for photos, Klip for videos, or Path for group sharing—and what you see is a random stream of disconnected items, stretching infinitely from today into last week, last month, and last year.

 

Each individual item in a stream may represent somebody’s special moment or act of curation, but there are no mechanisms within these platforms for ordering things or imposing a theme.

 

No pattern emerges. It’s just one damn thing after another.

 

Which is a little too much like real life, if you ask me. What’s missing is a sense of context.

 

I’d get a lot more out these apps if I understood why people share the things they do, or how they fit into a larger story.

 

That’s the whole point of Kullect.

 

As the name suggests, the app is all about building collections [which are like] extended, multimedia blog posts.

 

...

 

You can have as many collections as you want, and a collection can have any theme you want—I’ve seen Kullect users posting pictures from trips they’re taking, lists of their favorite bars or clubs, and varieties of roses in their gardens.

 

But whatever the theme, a collection amounts to a kind of story about what you’re doing or what you’re passionate about."

 

(Source: http://www.xconomy.com/national/2012/04/13/kullect-reinvents-blogging-for-the-smartphone-era/)

 

Check out this introductory 2min video: http://youtu.be/vsEBko0T05M

 

Android: https://market.android.com/details?id=com.kullect.android 

 

iPhone: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/kullect/id414731330?mt=8 

 

More info: http://www.kullect.com/ 


Via Robin Good
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Min Kim's comment, May 16, 2012 9:18 PM
Hi, Robin
This looks like an interesting tool to share interests of us.
Thank you for sharing.
Min
Robin Good's comment, May 17, 2012 1:16 AM
Thank you Min!
Casey,Go's comment, May 19, 2012 10:16 AM
하는사람이없음!ㅜㅜ
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Transnational Fan Communities: From Information Attention, Abundance to Engagement

Transnational Fan Communities:  From Information Attention, Abundance to Engagement | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Via renee fountain
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Facebook Introduces Interest Lists, 'Your Own Personal Newspaper' | Search Engine Watch

Facebook Introduces Interest Lists, 'Your Own Personal Newspaper' | Search Engine Watch | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Facebook has announced the launch of Interest Lists, a new feature designed to help users curate the content of pages and public figures in which they’re interested."

 

Curation hits Facebook.  You can become the sorter of all that Facebook info to collect and group what is of interest to you.  All my fellow Facebook link posters, this includes you.

 

Excerpted:

 

Facebook new Interest Lists promises to deliver the top posts from each interest group (list) in the user’s newsfeed.

 

Over the coming weeks, users will see “Add Interests” appear in the left-hand sidebar on their newsfeed. Users can also create lists from “Create List” in the “Interests” page.

 

Interest lists can help you turn Facebook into your own personalized newspaper, with special sections—or feeds—for topics that matter to you. You can find traditional news sections like Business, Sports and Style or get much more personalized.

 

Interest Lists are, of course, similar in concept to Google+ Circles, though they are limited to curating content from public figures and Pages..."

 

Read full article here: http://j.mp/xmbXuO


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Robin Good
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Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, March 9, 2012 3:12 PM
Hi Robin,
this is my humble appreciation: You are the king of curation..and we learned by you!
Thanks for appreciation about our curated work!
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Organizing and Curating Content is one of the Best Ways To Learn on a Subject

Organizing and Curating Content is one of the Best Ways To Learn on a Subject | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"There is no better way to learn something than to research, organize and build a personal framework of information, facts, resources, tools and stories around it," says Sam Gliksman.

 

And from Robin Good:

 

Curation can therefore be a revolutionary concept applicable both to learners and their approach as well as to the new "teachers" who need to become trusted guides in specific areas of interest.

 

Robin selected several excerpts to illustrate from Gliksman's post:

 

  • Reliance on any type of course textbook – digital, multimedia, interactive or otherwise – only fits as a more marginal element in student-centered learning models.
  • Lifelong learners need to be skilled in finding, filtering, collating, evaluating, collaborating, editing, analyzing and utilizing information from a multitude of sources.
  • Textbooks are an important gateway - a starting point ...we should encourage the “critical reading” of textbooks)
As a process consultant and facilitator of groups, this quote especially caught my eye:

 

  • ...the process of accessing, synthesizing and utilizing information is often as important as the product.

The full article is here.


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's comment, March 3, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you for being so kind. I am happy to see this resonates with your experience too.
janlgordon's comment, March 3, 2012 5:37 PM
This is another great piece and it certainly resonates with me, thanks for sharing this Robin.
Steven Verjans's curator insight, December 11, 2012 7:19 PM

Not to mention that it's the first step towards research as well.

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Sharing Resources - free PowerPoint templates

Sharing Resources - free PowerPoint templates | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"It's great to share resources for visuals.  Leawo Powerpoint tools is offering free templates & backgrounds - via downloads."


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Living in An Interconnected Society - The Good, the Bad & the Potential, Tiffany Shlain

Tiffany Shlain, founder of the Webby Awards, through video illustrates today's interconnected society at The Economist's 2012 event in San Francisco.

  

_____________________________

   

As we become more connected, we'll be able to see the cause and effect of our actions in real time.

_____________________________



What does it mean to live in a connected world? How is it changing us, our culture and the planet?

 

Her film "Connected"  illustrates:

Technology is changing the way we connect with people around us.

 

We have accumulated so much knowledge, yet we have trouble seeing the bigger picture. Perhaps it is time to declare our interdependence.

 

_____________________________

   

It's the beginning of a participatory revolution.
_____________________________


Close to 2 billion people on-line with 5 billion cell phones. It's the beginning of a participatory revolution. Ideas are free to interact, cross pollinate, creating hybrid perspectives all over the world.

 

As we become more connected, we'll be able to see the cause and effect of our actions in real time. ...Once we understand the supply chains and see their results, we'll be more thoughtful about our behavior.

 

Tiffany Shlain favorite quote:  "Go as far as you can see and when you get there. you'll be able to see even further."

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Exploring Change and Ongoing Discussions"


Video here: [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRTnUKpDGWs]


Via janlgordon
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Ken Morrison's comment, August 17, 2012 9:38 AM
Thanks for sharing this. I took an online course from Howard Rheingold, who is in this film a few times.
Ken
Ken Morrison's comment, August 20, 2012 12:00 PM
Thank you for the rescoops. I really like this quote:
"Go as far as you can see and when you get there. you'll be able to see even farther"

Best of luck on your scoop.it site. I like what I see here.
Ken
Ken Morrison's comment, September 2, 2012 7:53 PM
Thank you for the rescoop. I really hope that this video project is successful for her organization.
Ken
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Comparing Cooperative & Collaborative Learning

"A helpful mini-lecture compares & contrasts cooperative and collaborative learning."


Some good points here, via Regent University Center for Teaching & Learning.


Via Aniya, Jim Lerman, Dennis T OConnor, michel verstrepen
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The Facebook Business Model, Really? University Courses, Build Now, Money Later

The Facebook Business Model, Really?  University Courses, Build Now, Money Later | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Usually glacially-paced universities are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later." Does this "Facebook" style strategy also mean, "Build fast and see who benefits later, as long as it includes the investors?"  


There is some controvery that access to free courses does not a degree make, and that, after all, this could be a grand marketing scheme with questionable motives. Degrees are still in demand as much as they ever were.

_____________________

   

"[It's] a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps ...so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit.  ~  Stacey Simmons

_____________________

    


"By denying qualified people (meaning those who have completed the work) access to degrees or some other endorsement, institutions are establishing a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps by which they might educate themselves so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit, and certainly never enter the world of the elite. ~ Stacey Simmons, one of Fast Companies "Most Creative People"





  

If you've seen the movie: The Social Network, you'll know that that using Facebook as a business model is not unknown to higher education. However something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

   

Excerpted:    

   

Coursera is following an approach popular among Silicon Valley start-ups: Build fast and worry about money later. Venture capitalists—and even two universities—have invested more than $22-million in the effort already.

   

_____________________


   

...does it change their lives for the better?


_____________________

   


"Our VC's keep telling us that if you build a Web site that is changing the lives of millions of people, then the money will follow," says Daphne Koller, the company's other co-founder, who is also a professor at Stanford.

    

====


Deb: But, does it change their lives for the better?  Stanford, of course, had one of the first professors to jump ship to offer a large, free course to the world.  


  • Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


Stacey Simmons, CEO & Founder at Omnicademy, questions the motivation (Free is Not Liberated...) of offering free courses if degrees from prestigious institutions are not accessible to the many.  On the other hand, it could be an amazing new education model, per her TED conversation here.

     
    
My own alma mater, University of Michigan, has been among the first to invest.

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, How an Upstart Company Might Profit from Free Courses

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Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy

Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

What does analysis look like for informal learning? Is it different because it involves technology?  Not really - via Intrepid Learning.


It's useful to look at these data gathering steps as a possible checklist for creating the conditions to facilitate informal learning in your organization.  DPPE is a model I like to use:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate.  This fits right into the planning flow.  ~  Deb


Excerpted:


Analysis for informal learning: Here are a few actions you can take to assess the learner’s needs.


  • Spend time with the learner group in their environment, understand how they go about conducting their work, and look at how they fill learning gaps
.
  • Assess where and when they need the support of others because information is not readily available
.
  • Conduct interviews, ask questions to gain understanding of their needs
.
  • Craft a user story – a “day in the life of” – and vet that with the learner group
.
  • Use focus groups to gain insights including having them walk you through their work processes
.
  • Brainstorm with the learner group to identify where they think informal learning might help them accomplish tasks more easily or to provide context 
.

Once you gain an understanding of their needs for information, support, and learning within their workflow, you can prepare for the next step in building your informal learning strategy.


Read the full article here.

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Strategic Agility? FLIP & use Smart Mobs to thrive in our VUCA world: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous

Strategic Agility?  FLIP & use Smart Mobs to thrive in our VUCA world:  Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"If you stand still, you’ll fall behind in today’s VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous) world. Movement alone, however, doesn’t guarantee success." ~ Liz Guthridge


Great post by Liz!  On her blog, I commented that Liz speaks to a practical tool for VUCA preparedness so well, especially in cultivating a state of strategic agility, a big interest of mine this past year in assisting clients.


Liz is also doing some great things of interest to peer learners via her focus on smart mobs and crowdsourcing.  I've dipped my toe in the water in a parallel way to these practices via my experiences facilitating Open Space and Appreciative Inquiry and soon, my first UnConference.  All of these practices could be considered VUCA-friendly.


Excerpts:

.

By committing to FLIP (focus, listen, involve and personalize), you’re leading from wherever you are. And you’re serving as a role model to encourage others to be active, not passive, about your responsibilities.

.

With #3, INVOLVE, Liz talks about smart-mob organizing, bringing together groups of people for a common business challenge or social change.  This can easily include social media or other technology.

  • Liz is conducting a Best Practice Institute webinar on Change Through Crowdsourcing: How to Use Peer-by-Peer Practices to Transform Organizations on June 19 at 2 pm

.

With smart mobs, you can collaborate and cooperate in new, clever ways faster and more effective than ever before.

.

Rather than be content living with uncertainty and ambiguity in a VUCA world, you’re switching them around. You’re showing “agility” instead of “ambiguity” by seeking “understanding” instead of floundering in uncertainty.


Full post here.

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Google launches New Search Education site with Lesson Plans

Google launches New Search Education site with Lesson Plans | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Google launches a new Search Education site with lesson plans.

 

 


Via juandoming
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The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."


HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see that there may be some updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.


Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:


"...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."


____________________________


How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

____________________________


MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 


What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.


Our data show that great teams:


Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 


...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.


Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.



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De-Mystifying Khan Academy: Screen Capture for Educators

De-Mystifying Khan Academy: Screen Capture for Educators | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Info & a video about free & for fee whiteboard screencasting tools -  all the rage for creating educational videos like those featured in the Khan Academy."


Here's a few excerpts, adapted:


The Khan Academy website provides a FAQ that lists the tools that Salman Khan uses to create his videos:


  • Camtasia Recorder/Studio ($200)
  • ScreenVideoRecorder ($20)
  • SmoothDraw 3 (Free)
  • Microsoft Paint (Free)
  • Wacom Bamboo Tablet ($80)


There are three basic types of tools needed to do a whiteboard screencast:

  • a video screen recorder, 
  • a drawing program, and 
  • an input device. 


The basic concept is very simple: you plan your lesson, then record what you draw using the drawing program and your narration with the video screen capture program.



The input device (use a graphics tablet for best results) allows you to draw or write on a tablet rather than trying to use the mouse.


iPad Video Capture: For those interested in capturing the action on an iPad 2 or 3, this helpful video from MacMost Now will explain how.


====


I'd like to try this for instructional video soon.  Have any of our readers done this on the iPad?  

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Custom Education => Curating Custom Video Learning Courses with Course Hero

Custom Education => Curating Custom Video Learning Courses with Course Hero | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

This goes with my last post, custom education aided by tools like Course Hero.

 

Robin Good: Course Hero is a platform which allows the creation and delivery of online video courses curated from the best existing published content on that topic.

 

There are already ready-made courses to access or you can submit a topic that you would like to video-curate into a course.

 

"You can learn just about anything from YouTube...if you're willing to dig through millions of videos."

 

From Techcrunch: "Luckily, Course Hero has done the work for you, offering coherent classes by hosting collections of the best educational YouTube videos and other content.


The newly launched courses section of the eduTech startup’s site now has classes in entrepreneurship, business plan development, and programming in a variety of languages.

...

By drawing from YouTube and other openly available education, Course Hero plans to set up courses for anything it, or you, can think of.

...

Each course breaks down into roughly 6 chapters of 6 concept YouTube videos, Justin.tv videos, articles, and more. Unlike Udemy‘s one-teacher-per-class approach, Course Hero courses are compiled from content by many teachers.


Rather than put you at the mercy of long-winded professors, Course Hero trims videos and articles down to their most important teachings.

 

Along the way you’ll answer quiz questions, take tests to complete chapters, and face a final exam to finish a course and earn proficiency badges..."

 

Full article: http://techcrunch.com/2012/04/12/course-hero/ 

 

Courses: http://www.coursehero.com/courses/ 

 

More info: http://www.coursehero.com/ 


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Curate Your Fancy: Social Product Discovery Sites Bet on Passionate Curators

Curate Your Fancy: Social Product Discovery Sites Bet on Passionate Curators | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Helpful perspective from Robin Good and the curator of this post: Pinterest is only the tip of the iceberg. Out there there are literally tens of visual pinning and sharing boards covering styles, topics and tribes of all kinds.

 

One such group of product and object curation tools is the one dedicated to the collection and organization of luxury, fashion, art and design.

 

This article highlights and briefly reviews five of these social product discovery services while analyzing their key differences.

 

The services reviewed include:


-> Fancy

-> Discoveredd

-> StyleSaint

-> Spark Rebel

-> Common Bloggers

 

Very useful. 7/10

Full article: http://fashionablymarketing.me/2012/04/four-social-curation-sites-for-luxury-brands/ 


Via Robin Good, janlgordon
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Barriers to Learning in Organizations - Thinking in partnership & systems can make all the difference

Barriers to Learning in Organizations - Thinking in partnership & systems can make all the difference | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

I'll bet you'll be familiar with most or all of these barriers to learning in organizations.  Awareness and systemic, planful action on your preferred future can help us overcome them.  

 

Here's a sample from the 12 listed:

 

Program focus – new programs and services are evaluated in isolation rather than as interdependent parts of the whole organization, e.g., a diversity workshop is evaluated by the participants at the end of the workshop, not by everyone in the organization weeks and months after the workshop

 

Limited resources – learning is not given adequate funding and support, e.g., staff are not given resources to experiment with new ideas before risking large scale implementation


Work-learning dichotomy – producing and selling things is valued whereas learning is merely tolerated, e.g., little involvement of supervisors in the training of their direct-reports

 

Some of the others on this great list include:
Passive leadership, Non-learning culture, Not discussing the un-discussable, Need for control and 


Resistance to change – trying new ways of doing things is not encouraged, e.g., individuals are told to be creative and innovative but not allowed to [work on or] implement their ideas

 

What are your thoughts about a preferred future that makes these barriers irrelevant?


Via Frederic DOMON
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