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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Adaptive Learning is Hot!

Adaptive Learning is Hot! | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Adaptive learning is hot. The technology, loosely defined as data-driven tools that can help professors mold coursework around individual students’ abilities, is developing at a dizzying pace.


And colleges have been hard-pressed to keep up with the mishmash of adaptive offerings from emerging firms.


The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation representatives believe adaptive learning has plenty of potential, both to help more students earn a college credential and to do so more efficiently. So the foundation footed the bill to bring together leaders from a group of a dozen relatively tech-savvy colleges and two associations to share information.


The group has met three times. One attendee calls it the most diverse gathering of institutions he’s seen in 40 years on the job.



Read more:   Inside Higher Ed   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Tailored education?  No wonder it is hot!  ~ D

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Pure Peer-to-Peer Learning: Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral

Pure Peer-to-Peer Learning:  Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning."


Toward Peeragogy: the transformative power of high-end, peer-to-peer, global learning via the internet and social media.


From the author of a UC-Berkley post:


I've been invited to deliver the 2011 Regents' Lecture at University of California, Berkeley. I intend to expand the paragogy universe by instigating a peer-created guide to pure peer-to-peer learning. I'm calling it "peeragogy."


While "paragogy" is more etymologically correct, "peeragogy" is self-explanatory.


In my lecture, I'll explain the evolution of my own pedagogy and reveal some of what I've discovered in the world of online self-organized learning. Then I will invite volunteers to join me in a two week hybrid of face-to-face seminars and online discussion.


Can we self-organize our research, discover, summarize, and prioritize what is known through theory and practice, then propose, argue, and share a tentative resource guide for peeragogical groups?


In theory, those who use our guide to pursue their own explorations can edit the guide to reflect new learning.


It's not exactly a matter of making my own role of teacher obsolete. If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning.


This is the last in a very popular series. The previous three posts are: D.I.Y.U.: An Experiment, Pop Up U, and Learning Reimagined: Participatory, Peer, Global, Online.

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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The Facebook Business Model, Really? University Courses, Build Now, Money Later

The Facebook Business Model, Really?  University Courses, Build Now, Money Later | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Usually glacially-paced universities are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later." Does this "Facebook" style strategy also mean, "Build fast and see who benefits later, as long as it includes the investors?"  


There is some controvery that access to free courses does not a degree make, and that, after all, this could be a grand marketing scheme with questionable motives. Degrees are still in demand as much as they ever were.

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"[It's] a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps ...so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit.  ~  Stacey Simmons

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"By denying qualified people (meaning those who have completed the work) access to degrees or some other endorsement, institutions are establishing a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps by which they might educate themselves so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit, and certainly never enter the world of the elite. ~ Stacey Simmons, one of Fast Companies "Most Creative People"





  

If you've seen the movie: The Social Network, you'll know that that using Facebook as a business model is not unknown to higher education. However something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

   

Excerpted:    

   

Coursera is following an approach popular among Silicon Valley start-ups: Build fast and worry about money later. Venture capitalists—and even two universities—have invested more than $22-million in the effort already.

   

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...does it change their lives for the better?


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"Our VC's keep telling us that if you build a Web site that is changing the lives of millions of people, then the money will follow," says Daphne Koller, the company's other co-founder, who is also a professor at Stanford.

    

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Deb: But, does it change their lives for the better?  Stanford, of course, had one of the first professors to jump ship to offer a large, free course to the world.  


  • Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


Stacey Simmons, CEO & Founder at Omnicademy, questions the motivation (Free is Not Liberated...) of offering free courses if degrees from prestigious institutions are not accessible to the many.  On the other hand, it could be an amazing new education model, per her TED conversation here.

     
    
My own alma mater, University of Michigan, has been among the first to invest.

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, How an Upstart Company Might Profit from Free Courses

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