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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Connected Learning
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Inquiry Learning Vs. Standardized Content: Can They Coexist?

Inquiry Learning Vs. Standardized Content: Can They Coexist? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it


"Increasingly, any standards-based curriculum is at odds with the outside world.  Is sticking to content standards still appropriate?"


Beyond the core literacies of reading, writing, computation, and research, the world-wide culture of innovation, discovery, multi-polarity, interdisciplinary thinking, and rapid change depends on the explosive potential of the human mind, not entombed truths from the past.


....how can you, as a teacher, help move the dialogue forward? First, you can focus on becoming a highly-effective project based learning (PBL) teacher.


But PBL is the near-term solution. The ultimate destination is to align education with the requirements of a process-based world. 


Via MindShift


Via Stephanie Sandifer
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Intrigued by the question and the process-based recommendation.  What do you think?  ~  D

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Pure Peer-to-Peer Learning: Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral

Pure Peer-to-Peer Learning:  Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning."


Toward Peeragogy: the transformative power of high-end, peer-to-peer, global learning via the internet and social media.


From the author of a UC-Berkley post:


I've been invited to deliver the 2011 Regents' Lecture at University of California, Berkeley. I intend to expand the paragogy universe by instigating a peer-created guide to pure peer-to-peer learning. I'm calling it "peeragogy."


While "paragogy" is more etymologically correct, "peeragogy" is self-explanatory.


In my lecture, I'll explain the evolution of my own pedagogy and reveal some of what I've discovered in the world of online self-organized learning. Then I will invite volunteers to join me in a two week hybrid of face-to-face seminars and online discussion.


Can we self-organize our research, discover, summarize, and prioritize what is known through theory and practice, then propose, argue, and share a tentative resource guide for peeragogical groups?


In theory, those who use our guide to pursue their own explorations can edit the guide to reflect new learning.


It's not exactly a matter of making my own role of teacher obsolete. If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning.


This is the last in a very popular series. The previous three posts are: D.I.Y.U.: An Experiment, Pop Up U, and Learning Reimagined: Participatory, Peer, Global, Online.

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The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead?

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Is it really about teaching more, in less time, with shrinking budgets?  Or are we doing our brains & our bottom line a disservice, including conference event planning?"  


This is a great post on how to leverage learning that sticks, is sticky, vs. a spray and pray approach that still, unfortunately, dominates training programs and many conference events.


Here's an excerpt of this great post by 


Fresh thinking about how we learn
There are two kinds of learning. Learning physical tasks, like how to snowboard...embedded through repetition in the deeper motor regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia. This is known as procedural memory.


For workplace learning to be useful, we need to be able to recall ideas easily. 


In the last decade, Neuroscientists discovered that whether an idea can be easily recalled is linked to the strength of activation of the hippocampus during a learning task.


Many corporate training programs are the mental equivalent of trying to eat a week of meals in a day.


With this finding, scientists such as Lila Davachi at NYU and others have been able to test out many variables involved in learning experiences, such as what happens to the hippocampus if you distract people while absorbing information.


Over a few months of collaboration, Lila Davachi and I, along with Tobias Keifer, a consultant from Booz & Co., found a useful pattern that summarized the four biggest factors that determined the quality of recall. These are:

  • Attention, 
  • Generation, 
  • Emotion and 
  • Spacing, or the ‘AGES’ model. 

The AGES model was first presented at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit, and then published in the 2010 NeuroLeadership Journal. Read the full post including Learning that lasts through AGES that has a summary of this important research here.


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The Future Belongs to the Curious: A Manifesto - Not All who Wander are Lost

The Future Belongs to the Curious: A Manifesto - Not All who Wander are Lost | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

This reminds me that:

"not all who wander are lost."


Skillshare is sharing this manifesto under the banner of the transformative power of curiosity.  The blog post's video includes themes of lifelong learning and curiosity with a focus on early to middle life stages.  


Take a look and see what you think, if you are curious...

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