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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
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"We help each other be expert." Social Media to learn, teach, research – Full Video

Difficult polymath problem?  "...The discussion would go until they solved the problem.   ...We are all experts...  We help each other be expert."

Autonomy, privacy, platforms, research, complexity, sharing incuding solving a complex math problem - solving problems collaboratively.


Video of the Cristina Costa session, Social Media for learning, teaching and researching at the University of Liverpool on 9th February 2012 - full video.


From the Univ. of Liverpool describing this session:


  • Cristina is the Learning and Research Technologies Manager at the University of Salford and was named the Learning Technologist of the year in 2010 (Association for Learning Technology). the seminar was for teachers-researchers who have heard of social media but do not have a great deal of experience with it.
   
  • Cristina challenged the approach to using the web ‘as a book’ – just as a place to go and ‘look things up’. 
   
  • She encouraged us to view the web as a place to set up challenges and inquiries for students, to use its social personal(ised) potential and overall to use the web to create.  To contribute not just to consume.  
   
  • The session was really well received, full of ideas and links to new practical choices.  


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Via MonVall, juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cristina Costa covers many themes including the problems with using Facebook and what tools work better, and complex polymath problem solving through collaboration.  ~  D

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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A Whopping 47% is Peer Group: 7 compelling arguments for Peer Learning

A Whopping 47% is Peer Group:  7 compelling arguments for Peer Learning | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Peer learning is on the rise!

 

1. Powerful theoretical underpinning
Ref:  Judith Harris’s wonderful The Nurture Assumption, for which she received the George Miller Medal in psychology. 

 

In a deep look at the data she found something surprising: that 50% was genetic, just a few per cent parents and a whopping 47% peer group.

 

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2. Massively scalable
Peer learning may actually be better with large classes


3. Learning by teaching is probably the most powerful way to learn
Peer learning involves high-order, deep-processing activity.  The teacher may actually gain more than the learner.


4. Encourages critical thinking

5. Group bonding a side effect

6. Dramatic drops in drop-out rates

7. Higher attainment

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