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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Personal Knowledge Mastery
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It doesn’t take 10,000 hours to learn a new skill. It takes 20. And here’s how…

It doesn’t take 10,000 hours to learn a new skill. It takes 20. And here’s how… | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

If you have 20 minutes, watch the video, it's worth it.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The insights thanks to Kenneth Mikkelsen:  

1) Deconstruct the skill.

2)  Learn enough to self correct.

3) Remove barriers [and distractions.]

4) Practice - for at least 20 hours.


Practice could be greatly aided by group coaching and accountability partners, as well as good follow-on structure.


As a team, group coach and someone acquainted with peer learning circles, this reasonates.   ~  Deb

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 20, 2013 10:18 AM

The path to learning:


  1. Deconstruct the skill. Decide what you actually want to be able to do.
  2. Learn enough to self correct. Learn just enough that you can actually tell when you’re making a mistake.
  3. Remove Practice Barriers: i.e. remove distractions, yes, like you, Internet.
  4. Practice at least 20 hours. Finally, yep, practice for 20 hours.


Estelblau's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:27 PM

What's your opinion? Do you agree?

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 25, 2013 11:11 AM

Here's a summary of the TEDx insights, thanks to Kenneth Mikkelsen:


1) Deconstruct the skill.
2) Learn enough to self correct.
3) Remove barriers [and distractions.]
4) Practice - for at least 20 hours.


Practice could be greatly aided by group coaching and accountability partners, as well as good follow-on structure.


As a team, group coach and someone acquainted with peer learning circles, this resonates.

From Agile Learning  ~ Deb

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Content Curation World
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Organizing and Curating Content is one of the Best Ways To Learn on a Subject

Organizing and Curating Content is one of the Best Ways To Learn on a Subject | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"There is no better way to learn something than to research, organize and build a personal framework of information, facts, resources, tools and stories around it," says Sam Gliksman.

 

And from Robin Good:

 

Curation can therefore be a revolutionary concept applicable both to learners and their approach as well as to the new "teachers" who need to become trusted guides in specific areas of interest.

 

Robin selected several excerpts to illustrate from Gliksman's post:

 

  • Reliance on any type of course textbook – digital, multimedia, interactive or otherwise – only fits as a more marginal element in student-centered learning models.
  • Lifelong learners need to be skilled in finding, filtering, collating, evaluating, collaborating, editing, analyzing and utilizing information from a multitude of sources.
  • Textbooks are an important gateway - a starting point ...we should encourage the “critical reading” of textbooks)
As a process consultant and facilitator of groups, this quote especially caught my eye:

 

  • ...the process of accessing, synthesizing and utilizing information is often as important as the product.

The full article is here.


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's comment, March 3, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you for being so kind. I am happy to see this resonates with your experience too.
janlgordon's comment, March 3, 2012 5:37 PM
This is another great piece and it certainly resonates with me, thanks for sharing this Robin.
Steven Verjans's curator insight, December 11, 2012 7:19 PM

Not to mention that it's the first step towards research as well.