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The Military Case For Sharing Knowledge

The Military Case For Sharing Knowledge | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

When General Stanley McChrystal started fighting al Qaeda in 2003, information and secrets were the lifeblood of his operations. But as the unconventional battle waged on, he began to think that the culture of keeping important information classified was misguided and actually counterproductive. In a short but powerful talk McChrystal makes the case for actively sharing knowledge.


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Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This piece features an interactive transcript of a talk with this four-star general credited for creating a revolution in warfare that fuses intelligence and operations. ~ D

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 21, 7:47 AM

This is a strong case for personal knowledge mastery.


Powerful reflections from General McChrystal: 


"What we found is we had to change. We had to change our culture about information. We had to knock down walls. We had to share. We had to change from who needs to know to the fact that who doesn't know, and we need to tell, and tell them as quickly as we can. It was a significant culture shift for an organization that had secrecy in its DNA."


"What we did was we changed the idea of information, instead of knowledge is power, to one where sharing is power. It was the fundamental shift, not new tactics, not new weapons, not new anything else."

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Create-Learning » Results vs. Process. Achieving Goals While Improving the Work

Create-Learning » Results vs. Process. Achieving Goals While Improving the Work | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

A video is listed that examines process, vs. problems with Management by Objectives (MBOs) - it's not all about results.  LEAN is about process.   ...Have PDCA, Plan-Do-Check-Act within the leadership team.


___________________
   
Most scoreboards are focused on results.  If we don't have the results we need, what are we going to do about it?

  

___________________
    


Most scoreboards are focused on results.  If we don't have the results we need, what are we going to do about it?


It's not about, like losing weight, measuring more frequently.   What processes do we need to consider?   ...MBO meetings would sometimes includes, "I don't care how you do it, just do it (get the numbers.]"


"Results without a process is luck. Process without results is waste. How are your processes driving the goals you work to achieve?"
 

The need to have people fall in love with the process of working to achieve goals as opposed to the goal itself will allow quick change and more innovation.
 

The goal is not and should not be ignored…the challenge is that the processes being used to achieve the goal need to be evaluated to ensure you are working to achieve the goal.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This timeline shows missing elements with problematic MBOs.  it's good to see this Knowledge Management piece on putting process & results together.

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David Hain's curator insight, February 2, 11:46 PM

Nice matrix on intentional success.

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Open Source Scholarship - Next Steps

Open Source Scholarship - Next Steps | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
The concept is Open Source Scholarship.

Excerpts:

I find it challenging to figure out how to really 
be a practicing open source scholar. To me, Open Source Scholarship is not just about our research, but about our practice as academics–a practice of research, inquiry, teaching, learning, dis/un-covery, and engagement. Practically, politically, ethically, and socially, we face many barriers in opening up our processes as scholars.

___________________________

It is about...build[ing] a commons, while ...dismantl[ing] the histories of oppression...used to promote and the limited knowledge systems we’ve propagated. 

___________________________


As a teacher, I’m limited from opening up my syllabus and course online because it is owned by my school, or owned by my department, and is therefore proprietary.

As a graduate student, if I begin to publish my half-baked ideas and thoughts as I work and invite criticism as I go, I am breaking out of standard academic norms, and am therefore “endangering my future career.”

Open Source Scholarship is a massive attitude and orientation change change for scholars. ... It is about transforming a history in academia of using secrecy, privacy, and private ownership of ideas into one of shared, participatory, co-designed and developed, public, and free work.

It is about...helping to build a commons, while simultaneously attempting to dismantle the histories of oppression that knowledge generated in universities has been used to promote and the limited knowledge systems we’ve propagated.

Open source scholarship is a radical transformation in the universities relationship with ideas, in scholars relationships with students and colleagues, in relationships with communities. It is an explosion of the concept of “inside” and “outside”, of “expert” and “lay”, of privileged knowledge and everyday knowledge.

Whether or not academics and universities want it, this is the coming world. More and more people will be empowered to use and conduct research, ....the state of knowledge will be opened up in new ways we can’t yet even predict


Related posts by Deb:

   

We’re in a Bubble – It’s Higher Education

         

Agile Leader Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through Sharp Rocks
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

With the pressures on higher education to deal with rising tuition, the debt load created by the ubiquitous BA, BS degree, the idea of Open Source Scholarship is radical indeed.   ~ Deb

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 22, 2013 4:43 AM

Open source scholarship

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
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"We help each other be expert." Social Media to learn, teach, research – Full Video

Difficult polymath problem?  "...The discussion would go until they solved the problem.   ...We are all experts...  We help each other be expert."

Autonomy, privacy, platforms, research, complexity, sharing incuding solving a complex math problem - solving problems collaboratively.


Video of the Cristina Costa session, Social Media for learning, teaching and researching at the University of Liverpool on 9th February 2012 - full video.


From the Univ. of Liverpool describing this session:


  • Cristina is the Learning and Research Technologies Manager at the University of Salford and was named the Learning Technologist of the year in 2010 (Association for Learning Technology). the seminar was for teachers-researchers who have heard of social media but do not have a great deal of experience with it.
   
  • Cristina challenged the approach to using the web ‘as a book’ – just as a place to go and ‘look things up’. 
   
  • She encouraged us to view the web as a place to set up challenges and inquiries for students, to use its social personal(ised) potential and overall to use the web to create.  To contribute not just to consume.  
   
  • The session was really well received, full of ideas and links to new practical choices.  


Related posts by Deb:  



     




Via MonVall, juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cristina Costa covers many themes including the problems with using Facebook and what tools work better, and complex polymath problem solving through collaboration.  ~  D

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Pure Peer-to-Peer Learning: Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral

Pure Peer-to-Peer Learning:  Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning."


Toward Peeragogy: the transformative power of high-end, peer-to-peer, global learning via the internet and social media.


From the author of a UC-Berkley post:


I've been invited to deliver the 2011 Regents' Lecture at University of California, Berkeley. I intend to expand the paragogy universe by instigating a peer-created guide to pure peer-to-peer learning. I'm calling it "peeragogy."


While "paragogy" is more etymologically correct, "peeragogy" is self-explanatory.


In my lecture, I'll explain the evolution of my own pedagogy and reveal some of what I've discovered in the world of online self-organized learning. Then I will invite volunteers to join me in a two week hybrid of face-to-face seminars and online discussion.


Can we self-organize our research, discover, summarize, and prioritize what is known through theory and practice, then propose, argue, and share a tentative resource guide for peeragogical groups?


In theory, those who use our guide to pursue their own explorations can edit the guide to reflect new learning.


It's not exactly a matter of making my own role of teacher obsolete. If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning.


This is the last in a very popular series. The previous three posts are: D.I.Y.U.: An Experiment, Pop Up U, and Learning Reimagined: Participatory, Peer, Global, Online.

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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on People , then Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on People , then Results | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 

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See the companion post about Holacracy, here.


As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

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  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams, delivered once a month via email.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

         

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 11:50 AM

Holacracies, wirearchies and feedback rich cultures are one of the key ways organizations can adapt to disruptive change, or so it is beginning to look.   It will take solid leadership to change the nature of control and power in new millenium organizations, with unconventional larger organizations. like Zappos, leading the way.  ~  D

Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 10:46 AM

well worth the reading time.

BhanuNagender's curator insight, March 7, 4:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Socialearning
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Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence”

Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence” | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Fascinating nuggets from the book summary of Collective Intelligence by Pierre Lévy (click through post here to locate & enlarge the chart):

 

The premise: Humankind must acknowledge the potential of cyberspace to enable beneficial new forms of complex collective thought, collective expression, and social organization.
 

Technology makes this feasible (p. 246). The author's ideas are reminiscent of:

  • Vannevar Bush‘s collective memory
  • Marshall McLuhan‘s notion of a forthcoming “global village”
  • Douglas Engelbart‘s vision of the computer as a tool to augment human thought,
  • J. C. R. Licklider‘s plans for symbiotic human—computer networks.

   

Lévy calls for a revolution in society’s understanding of itself – the expansion of subjectivity (cf. Lévy, 2000).

   

Features:

  • Multi-modal and dynamic (p. 120)
  • Virtual worlds instruments of self-knowledge and self-definition 
  • Deterritorialized with self-organization
  • Continuous self-invention of human communities
  • Computer-aided imagination 
  • The collective can choose to foster & encourage individuality
    
From another reviewer:
 
Levy begins with the premise that the prosperity of any nation or other entity depends on their ability to navigate the knowledge space, and ... knowledge space will displace the spaces of the (natural) earth, (political) territory, or (economic) commodity. 

Via Pierre Levy, Frederic DOMON
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

One word: Fascinating! (nod to Mr. Spock)


The language of the post & the book itself is academic, yet the ideas are wonder producing.  I think we are seeing the first signs of what Lévy describes in social media, gaming and in group processes like Open Space Technology, among other things.  ~  D

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, January 14, 1:50 AM

Great one.

Miguel Angel Perez Alvarez's curator insight, January 14, 11:14 AM

Inteligencia colectiva, evolución

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 8:18 PM

Cyberspace big thoughts, and perhaps indicating a fusion or an evolution of knowledge management in a group space.

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Maximizing Business Value
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Learning is the Work ~ The Future of Jobs

Learning is the Work ~ The Future of Jobs | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"...automation is replacing most routine work...[leaving] customized work, which requires initiative, creativity and passion."

Valued work, and the environments in which it takes place, is becoming more complex. Professionals today are doing work that cannot be easily standardized.


______________________________

...the optimal way to do work is to constantly probe the environment and test emergent practices...[which] are dependent on the cooperation of all workers [and]... the free flow of knowledge.

______________________________

 

"In complexity, we can determine the relationship between cause and effect only in retrospect. ...[This] puts into question most of our management frameworks that require detailed analysis before we take action. It also shows that identifying and copying best practices is pretty well useless.


"In complex work environments, the optimal way to do work is to constantly probe the environment and test emergent practices. This requires an engaged and empowered workforce. Emergent practices are dependent on the cooperation of all workers (and management) as well as the free flow of knowledge.

 

"Work in complex situations requires a greater percentage of implicit knowledge,...Research shows that sharing complex knowledge requires strong interpersonal relationships. But discovering innovative ideas usually comes through loose social ties. Organizations need both, and communities of practice can help to connect tight work teams with loose social networks.

    

...this new world of work needs individuals who are adept at sense-making. One framework for this is personal knowledge management."


The most effective learning in the new world of work will be when engaged individuals, working out loud, share their knowledge. Training and education will remain inputs, but minor ones. 


See the other ScoopIt featuring and earlier post from the same author:      Pushing and Pulling Tacit Knowledge


As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.
 

Related posts by Deb:
    

     

    


  

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

     


Via Jim Lerman, midmarketplace
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Harold Jarche make the point of loose -tight structure and customization, dependent on open, sharing environments.  Curation, such as these newsletters on ScoopIt, is a type of personal knowledge management.

Other posts shared in this stream offer the types of open networks and giving, learning, helping environments that can create the needed loose - tight structures for learning.    ~  D

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Laura Rosillo's curator insight, October 13, 2013 5:52 AM

Sobre el futuro del trabajo y la Gestión del Conocimiento: El aprendizaje es el trabajo de Harold Jarche: Muy recomendable su lectura

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What Makes a Good Content Curator?

What Makes a Good Content Curator? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Sharing good content shows you understand what’s interesting and valuable to your target markets. It will help you increase your followers and establish your credibility. "


Excerpted from the article:


A good content curator has to sift through tons of content, quickly and efficiently, finding what is both relevant and good quality.

So what does a good content curator look like?


1) Really Long Arms:
You have the expanded reach to know the smaller players with a unique perspective, the powerhouse publishers, and all of the niche players. This allows for a healthy variety of content, with differing perspectives.

2) Super Fast Scanning Eyes:
An efficient content curator knows how to scan an article for legitimacy, value, and relevance to their target market.

3) A Raised Eyebrow:
Each time you come upon something new, your eyebrow is already up, because you’re there to sniff it out to make sure it’ll pass the test. People will lose interest in what you share and you will hurt your credibility if you share content that isn’t high quality.

4) A Belly Full of Hunger:
Good content curators love what they do and are passionate about traversing the wide expanse of the web to find the best content possible."

Read full article here:
http://socialmediatoday.com/parkerwhite/1236016/what-makes-good-content-curator

 


Via Robin Good, Giuseppe Mauriello, John van den Brink, Ivo Nový, Robin Martin
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Captures the golden nuggets of curation in short form.  Good post.  ~  Deb

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Charlotte L Weitze's curator insight, March 11, 2013 1:43 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

Lindsey Weintraub at SocialMediaToday has a short but valuable guide to four key traits a good curator really needs to have.

 

From the ability to search and tap into sources that should not be what everyone else is looking at, to the ability to know in and out its chosen niche of interest and its players, the good content curator has an uncanny talent for scanning, selecting and triple-verifying anything potentially interesting before even considering showcasing in its selections.

 

Rightful. Good for anyone just starting out with curation. 7/10

 

Article:http://socialmediatoday.com/parkerwhite/1236016/what-makes-good-content-curator#

EsdeGroot's curator insight, March 29, 2013 3:00 AM

This will be used in a course about SoMe

 

Rebeca Lamas's curator insight, November 18, 2013 5:07 AM

¿Qué aspectos hacen de ti un buen Content Curator?