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How learning and education is changing to meet our needs today and tomorrow.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Exposing Corruption, Injustices, & The Good, the Bad & the Ugly
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5 Brain Myths That Won't Go Away, Getting the Facts Right in 2014

5 Brain Myths That Won't Go Away, Getting the Facts Right in 2014 | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Scientists are not only far from a comprehensive explanation of how the brain works, they can't even agree on the best way to study it. So it's not surprising that myths and misinformation continue to persist.  Why do we continue to buy into these falsehoods?"
 

Myth: You are either right- or left-brained dominant.

    

"In reality, we are all whole-brain users." said Shelton. "But this myth helps people define their differences, similar to calling someone male or female. So if you define yourself as right-brained, it immediately connects you with a set of predetermined qualities."

     

Other debunked myths in this useful piece:

   

Myth: You only use 10 percent of your brain.

Myth: Alcohol kills brain cells.

Myth: Brain damage is permanent.

Myth: Your IQ is a fixed number.

      

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

              

      

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

Via Dana Hoffman
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Brain sapping beliefs persist and drain productivity and performance in business and in overall learning.  Check the job descriptions in your organization for words like "must be able to multi-task" and must "manage multiple projects simultaneously." 


Check manufacturing employee schedules for overloaded work-days such 12 hour days 7 days a week.  It's happening in businesses making record profits and NOT hiring temp staff to even out the work load.


At least this good article brings us up to date on brain science.  We have a long way to go.   ~  Deb 

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Changing Behavior
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Will 2014 Be Different? 2013 Study - 75% Change Failure Rate continues #Infographic

Will 2014 Be Different?  2013 Study - 75% Change Failure Rate continues #Infographic | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

 

Related tools by Deb:

     

Receive Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring two approaches to change via once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.


Via Changing Behavior
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is an helpful infographic for perspective in Agile Learning as well it's original location on ScoopIt:  Change Management Resources.  ~  D

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Zento Mike Warren's curator insight, January 31, 2014 4:54 AM

Leaders will effect or be affected by change and how they respond to this inevitable circumstance will impact their leadership and culture. This great article and graphic gives unique insights into the challenges of change! Get professional guidance . . . www.zentosolutions.com

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 1, 2014 12:23 AM

What change leaders need to get right:   Focus your training and tools on helping managers and keeping the message consistent and fully communicated throughout the organization.  ~  D

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, February 14, 2014 1:58 AM

Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from People Data, Infographics & Sweet Stats
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Me as an infographic! Christina's Bio Illustrates It.

Me as an infographic! Christina's Bio Illustrates It. | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

To illustrate the previous full video on teaching, learning and doing research via social media in a university setting, here is an Infographic on Christina Costa.


The website also links to her PhD thesis:  

The participatory web in the context of academic research : landscapes of change and conflicts



I just developed an infographic on my experience using easel.ly


It doesn’t look as great as I’d like – need to improve my design skills!! – but this was pretty easy to create.


A great way to illustrate one’s experience.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Originally posted on my curation stream, "Infographics and Sweet Stats" - it also belongs here on Agile Learning to illustrate Christina's video listed below (full session on using Social Media in learning, research, teaching.) ~ D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:29 AM

As she says,  "A great way to illustrate one’s experience."  ~  D

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:36 AM

I'd be remiss if I didn't also Scoop this to my Social Media curation stream at the SMLL - social media at the university, with the video lecturers bio illustrated via this infographic tool.  ~  Deb

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Content Curation World
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Clip, Annotate, Markup and Permanently Archive Any Web Page with Scribble

Clip, Annotate, Markup and Permanently Archive Any Web Page with Scribble | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Scribble lets you highlight, annotate and easily save, share and collaborate on your web research with others. Sign up for free!


Via Robin Good
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cool tool for web page research, perhaps any research using the internet. ~ Deb

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SLRE's curator insight, August 2, 2013 6:45 AM

Handig app om dingen die je op het web tegenkomt van aantekeningen te voorzien en te bewaren.

wanderingsalsero's curator insight, October 20, 2013 7:54 PM

I haven't read this article but I'm seriously interested in the question implied in the title.....i.e. how to 'mark up' information and get them on the web.  In many cases, I think that's adequate for most people's purpose.

 

I have yet to find a tool that I found really comfortable for doing that.  Maybe this is it.

YB's curator insight, June 22, 2014 9:12 AM

CROCODOC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmWcWbGnpt4

 

A.NNOTATE

 

מגוון של תכניות להערות על PDF

http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/top-web-annotation-and-markup-tools/

 

 

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Social Media Learning Lab
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Curation, Collection, Bookmarking: Does it Obscure Our Bias Toward Action? | ProfHacker & Chronicle of Higher Ed

Curation, Collection, Bookmarking: Does it Obscure Our Bias Toward Action? | ProfHacker &  Chronicle of Higher Ed | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

What are the actions, results that come from our collecting, referencing, bookmarking, and proliferations of social media profiles, blogs, channels and social empires?


This post refers to current tools, and probes our purpose in using them by asking questions I often ask in executive coaching or in just making a smart decision:

  • What's important?  
  • What really matters?


Excerpted:

...With the near omnipresence of digital reference material, many of us no longer turn first to our own collections. Yet we were trained, explicitly or implicitly, to collect and save large amounts of information.


In Scott Belky’s recent book Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality, he argues that most people spend too much time collecting notes of various kinds, and goes so far as to say:


References obstruct your bias toward action.


Many times, we hold onto an email, the URL of a website, or the PDF of a journal article, as a kind of emblem of an action we intend to take...


If those actions are important, then they should be captured and put into your action list. Otherwise you’re just piling up digital clutter.


Tools like Evernote, Catch (formerly 3Banana) and DevonThink can help you tag, manage, and easily retrieve those references.)


If you just keep everything, then you lose sight of what’s most important.


Today, with so much information all around us, there’s less and less that you really need to keep yourself. Focus on the important stuff and let go of the rest.

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Reading, Writing, Empathy: The Rise of 'Social Emotional Learning'

Reading, Writing, Empathy: The Rise of 'Social Emotional Learning' | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Marc Brackett never liked school. “I was always bored,” he says, “and I never felt like any of my teachers really cared. I can’t think of anybody that made me feel inspired.”

 

It’s a surprising complaint coming from a 42-year-old Yale research scientist with a 27-page CV and nearly $4 million in career funding. But Brackett knows that many kids feel the way he does about school, and he wants to do a complete emotional makeover of the nation’s schools.

 

At a time of contentious debate over how to reform schools to make teachers more effective and students more successful, “social emotional learning” may be a key part of the solution.

 

An outgrowth of the emotional intelligence framework, popularized by Daniel Goleman, SEL teaches children how to identify and manage emotions and interactions.

 

One of the central considerations of an evolved EQ—as proponents call an “emotional quotient”—is promoting empathy, a critical and often neglected quality in our increasingly interconnected, multicultural world.

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Emerging Technologies News via the Horizon Report, The 2014 Higher Education Edition Video

New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) recently released  the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition.  It's part of an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education.

Fast Trends: Driving changes in higher education over the next one to two years

  • Growing Ubiquity of Social Media
  • Integration of Online, Hybrid, and Collaborative Learning

Mid-Range Trends: Driving changes in higher education within three to five years
  • Rise of Data-Driven Learning and Assessment
  • Shift from Students as Consumers to Students as Creators


Long-Range Trends: Driving changes in higher education in five or more years

  • Agile Approaches to Change   There is a growing consensus....that institutional leadership and curricula could benefit from agile startup models. 

  • Evolution of Online Learning Progress in learning analytics, adaptive learning, and a combination of cutting-edge asynchronous and synchronous tools will continue to advance the state of online learning... though many of these are still the subjects of experiments and research.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Trend watching!  This is useful for any type of forecasting for higher education, with implications for anyone involved in learning and technology.  ~  D

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Winning the Generation Game - Crossing Over

Winning the Generation Game - Crossing Over | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

“WHY do you pander to them?” This question kept being put to Marian Salzman, the boss of Havas PR, by her older workers in the days after the firm launched its latest recruitment ad..."


...A recent survey by Ernst & Young, which asked American professionals from each age group their opinions of each generation, found significant differences, not all of them predictable.  (Chart in original source.)


 ....To get them to work together ...[Ernst & Young] is encouraging them ...do voluntary work in cross-generational teams. Millennials may be cool with this; their older peers not so much.  


Related articles by Deb:
    

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way

   

Change, Innovators, Creativity and Community, Will it Blend?

   

Co-Creation in Theory U: Leading from the Future as it Emerges & the Road to Commitment

  

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Connect the dots, from the article - Baby-boomers, GenX and Millenials.  Which group is seen as:

  • hard-working and productive
  • best team players
  • good at tech stuff but truculent  & work-shy?


This piece shares research and raises state-of-the-practice questions about how to work across generational differences.


~ Deb

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
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"We help each other be expert." Social Media to learn, teach, research – Full Video

Difficult polymath problem?  "...The discussion would go until they solved the problem.   ...We are all experts...  We help each other be expert."

Autonomy, privacy, platforms, research, complexity, sharing incuding solving a complex math problem - solving problems collaboratively.


Video of the Cristina Costa session, Social Media for learning, teaching and researching at the University of Liverpool on 9th February 2012 - full video.


From the Univ. of Liverpool describing this session:


  • Cristina is the Learning and Research Technologies Manager at the University of Salford and was named the Learning Technologist of the year in 2010 (Association for Learning Technology). the seminar was for teachers-researchers who have heard of social media but do not have a great deal of experience with it.
   
  • Cristina challenged the approach to using the web ‘as a book’ – just as a place to go and ‘look things up’. 
   
  • She encouraged us to view the web as a place to set up challenges and inquiries for students, to use its social personal(ised) potential and overall to use the web to create.  To contribute not just to consume.  
   
  • The session was really well received, full of ideas and links to new practical choices.  


Related posts by Deb:  



     




Via MonVall, juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cristina Costa covers many themes including the problems with using Facebook and what tools work better, and complex polymath problem solving through collaboration.  ~  D

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
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The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."


HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see that there may be some updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.


Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:


"...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."


____________________________


How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

____________________________


MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 


What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.


Our data show that great teams:


Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 


...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.


Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.



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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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A Whopping 47% is Peer Group: 7 compelling arguments for Peer Learning

A Whopping 47% is Peer Group:  7 compelling arguments for Peer Learning | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Peer learning is on the rise!

 

1. Powerful theoretical underpinning
Ref:  Judith Harris’s wonderful The Nurture Assumption, for which she received the George Miller Medal in psychology. 

 

In a deep look at the data she found something surprising: that 50% was genetic, just a few per cent parents and a whopping 47% peer group.

 

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2. Massively scalable
Peer learning may actually be better with large classes


3. Learning by teaching is probably the most powerful way to learn
Peer learning involves high-order, deep-processing activity.  The teacher may actually gain more than the learner.


4. Encourages critical thinking

5. Group bonding a side effect

6. Dramatic drops in drop-out rates

7. Higher attainment

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