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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Maximizing Business Value
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Learning is the Work ~ The Future of Jobs

Learning is the Work ~ The Future of Jobs | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"...automation is replacing most routine work...[leaving] customized work, which requires initiative, creativity and passion."

Valued work, and the environments in which it takes place, is becoming more complex. Professionals today are doing work that cannot be easily standardized.


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...the optimal way to do work is to constantly probe the environment and test emergent practices...[which] are dependent on the cooperation of all workers [and]... the free flow of knowledge.

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"In complexity, we can determine the relationship between cause and effect only in retrospect. ...[This] puts into question most of our management frameworks that require detailed analysis before we take action. It also shows that identifying and copying best practices is pretty well useless.


"In complex work environments, the optimal way to do work is to constantly probe the environment and test emergent practices. This requires an engaged and empowered workforce. Emergent practices are dependent on the cooperation of all workers (and management) as well as the free flow of knowledge.

 

"Work in complex situations requires a greater percentage of implicit knowledge,...Research shows that sharing complex knowledge requires strong interpersonal relationships. But discovering innovative ideas usually comes through loose social ties. Organizations need both, and communities of practice can help to connect tight work teams with loose social networks.

    

...this new world of work needs individuals who are adept at sense-making. One framework for this is personal knowledge management."


The most effective learning in the new world of work will be when engaged individuals, working out loud, share their knowledge. Training and education will remain inputs, but minor ones. 


See the other ScoopIt featuring and earlier post from the same author:      Pushing and Pulling Tacit Knowledge


As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.
 

Related posts by Deb:
    

     

    


  

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

     


Via Jim Lerman, midmarketplace
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Harold Jarche make the point of loose -tight structure and customization, dependent on open, sharing environments.  Curation, such as these newsletters on ScoopIt, is a type of personal knowledge management.

Other posts shared in this stream offer the types of open networks and giving, learning, helping environments that can create the needed loose - tight structures for learning.    ~  D

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Laura Rosillo's curator insight, October 13, 2013 1:52 PM

Sobre el futuro del trabajo y la Gestión del Conocimiento: El aprendizaje es el trabajo de Harold Jarche: Muy recomendable su lectura

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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A Personalized Learning Model - to Guide Education Technology Investments

A Personalized Learning Model - to Guide Education Technology Investments | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Most of our education technology investments involve some combination of improving the state of practice in "What Don't I Know" - "How Do I Learn This?" and "How Did I Do?"

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is part 3 of a 3 series set of short, clear blog posts advocating for adaptive learning with feedback.   The author offers precise definitions of the elements.



These are useful concepts in the series, especially the problem of the bell curve in Part 1, which I'll address soon in my Talent & Performance Development curation stream.


~  Deb

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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The Facebook Business Model, Really? University Courses, Build Now, Money Later

The Facebook Business Model, Really?  University Courses, Build Now, Money Later | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Usually glacially-paced universities are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later." Does this "Facebook" style strategy also mean, "Build fast and see who benefits later, as long as it includes the investors?"  


There is some controvery that access to free courses does not a degree make, and that, after all, this could be a grand marketing scheme with questionable motives. Degrees are still in demand as much as they ever were.

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"[It's] a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps ...so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit.  ~  Stacey Simmons

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"By denying qualified people (meaning those who have completed the work) access to degrees or some other endorsement, institutions are establishing a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps by which they might educate themselves so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit, and certainly never enter the world of the elite. ~ Stacey Simmons, one of Fast Companies "Most Creative People"





  

If you've seen the movie: The Social Network, you'll know that that using Facebook as a business model is not unknown to higher education. However something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

   

Excerpted:    

   

Coursera is following an approach popular among Silicon Valley start-ups: Build fast and worry about money later. Venture capitalists—and even two universities—have invested more than $22-million in the effort already.

   

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...does it change their lives for the better?


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"Our VC's keep telling us that if you build a Web site that is changing the lives of millions of people, then the money will follow," says Daphne Koller, the company's other co-founder, who is also a professor at Stanford.

    

====


Deb: But, does it change their lives for the better?  Stanford, of course, had one of the first professors to jump ship to offer a large, free course to the world.  


  • Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


Stacey Simmons, CEO & Founder at Omnicademy, questions the motivation (Free is Not Liberated...) of offering free courses if degrees from prestigious institutions are not accessible to the many.  On the other hand, it could be an amazing new education model, per her TED conversation here.

     
    
My own alma mater, University of Michigan, has been among the first to invest.

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, How an Upstart Company Might Profit from Free Courses

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Support, enhance informal learning, rather than managing it. ~ Stephen's Web

Support, enhance informal learning, rather than managing it. ~ Stephen's Web | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Informal learning is not something L&D can design into the formal training mix, in order to try and “manage” everything everybody learns in the organisation (an impossible task!)

 

...Rather is something that needs to be supported and enhanced as it occurs naturally in the workflow – in order to help people learn to do their jobs (better)."

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Learning Design Perspectives: SAM and ADDIE

Learning Design Perspectives:  SAM and ADDIE | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

The author pointed says that no model (old or new) will prevent ‘boring, lifeless training.’   Can the [classic] ADDIE model be enhanced?  Absolutely. 

Excerpts:

The essential differences in these models, including what’s captured in Allen’s SAM process, is to make the model less linear and to include feedback loops within the process for regular look backs, particularly to the data from the analysis phase. 


The problem with these models, including SAM, is that they seem to require redundancy.  There are certainly instances when such redundancy is not necessary. 


... the ADDIE model was [not] designed to be a strictly linear process anyway...

[The author]  ...prefers this cyclic visualization of ADDIE to better show the interactions between the phases.


From the comments:  " Is SAM similar to Agile and ADDIE similar to Waterfall, as in software development?   

    

Related posts by Deb:
    

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

     

Agile Leader Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through Sharp Rocks

     

Co-Creation in Theory U: Leading from the Future as it Emerges & the Road to Commitment


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This thoughtful article and  comments help in getting a perspective on any model past and present.  Commenter Karen offers that “pure Agile” approaches do not work for all projects.  She mentions  “AgileFall” as a combination of approaches.  

She also suggests that a combo of SAM and ADDIE will emerge, keeping ADDIE’s structure and proven methods while incorporating SAM’s iterative approach. ~  Deb

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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MOOCs and Blended Learning take the Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education

MOOCs and Blended Learning take the Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"I will say the blended model, ...with certainty, is revolutionizing, higher education." "...access to a Master Teacher..."  ~ Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania


Charlie interviews:

  • Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX;
  • Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania;
  • Joel Klein, former New York City Schools chancellor and CEO of Amplify and
  • Tom Friedman of the New York 


Related posts by Deb:

  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Pacing the learning, removing the exclusive, high expense of the classic 4 year degree, access to "Master Teachers," are some the the advantages.

An alternative view of higher education was forecast by a guest blogger on my own website who built his own degree at a much lower cost, listed above, "Right Sizing..."   ~ Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 7:28 PM

A blend of views discuss MOOCs and on-line education.  Note the access and pacing comments of Anant Agarwal from edX and what he's implying.  ~  Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy

Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

What does analysis look like for informal learning? Is it different because it involves technology?  Not really - via Intrepid Learning.


It's useful to look at these data gathering steps as a possible checklist for creating the conditions to facilitate informal learning in your organization.  DPPE is a model I like to use:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate.  This fits right into the planning flow.  ~  Deb


Excerpted:


Analysis for informal learning: Here are a few actions you can take to assess the learner’s needs.


  • Spend time with the learner group in their environment, understand how they go about conducting their work, and look at how they fill learning gaps
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  • Assess where and when they need the support of others because information is not readily available
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  • Conduct interviews, ask questions to gain understanding of their needs
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  • Craft a user story – a “day in the life of” – and vet that with the learner group
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  • Use focus groups to gain insights including having them walk you through their work processes
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  • Brainstorm with the learner group to identify where they think informal learning might help them accomplish tasks more easily or to provide context 
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Once you gain an understanding of their needs for information, support, and learning within their workflow, you can prepare for the next step in building your informal learning strategy.


Read the full article here.

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