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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Top 10 Ways to Destroy Motivation at Work

Top 10 Ways to Destroy Motivation at Work | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Want to know how to destroy motivation at work? These key factors, attitudes, and behaviors destroy motivation at work. It doesn't have to be that way. 


A sample from the list of 10:

  •  Make rules for the many because of the behavior of a few. Organizations need policies and rules to create a legal, ethical, effective workplace. They do not need a policy to solve every problem. 


  • Focus on mistakes and errors no matter how trivial they are in comparison with successes.
    This is especially a problem at weekly meetings and during periodic performance evaluations. Managers must provide balanced feedback, but let’s get real. If an employee is making mistakes most of the time, why not fire the employee? The job must be a terrible fit for the employee’s skills and capabilities. To dwell only on problem areas destroys the employee’s confidence and self-esteem, makes the employee more error-prone, and makes your organization wonder why they promoted you to management.


  • Hold meetings, coaching sessions, and performance reviews in which the manager does the majority of the talking.
    Only a rare employee will find a work environment in which he or she is talked at motivating. But, it happens frequently. Even in organizations that encourage employee involvement, managers are not always skilled at discussing performance with employees. The manager may be afraid that if he stops talking, the employee will make demands he can’t fulfill. The manager may


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is leaning gently toward distributed, groups and teams.  We'll see what's next.  Do you agree?

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Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy

Inquiry Building Blocks for Your Informal Learning Strategy | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

What does analysis look like for informal learning? Is it different because it involves technology?  Not really - via Intrepid Learning.


It's useful to look at these data gathering steps as a possible checklist for creating the conditions to facilitate informal learning in your organization.  DPPE is a model I like to use:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate.  This fits right into the planning flow.  ~  Deb


Excerpted:


Analysis for informal learning: Here are a few actions you can take to assess the learner’s needs.


  • Spend time with the learner group in their environment, understand how they go about conducting their work, and look at how they fill learning gaps
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  • Assess where and when they need the support of others because information is not readily available
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  • Conduct interviews, ask questions to gain understanding of their needs
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  • Craft a user story – a “day in the life of” – and vet that with the learner group
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  • Use focus groups to gain insights including having them walk you through their work processes
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  • Brainstorm with the learner group to identify where they think informal learning might help them accomplish tasks more easily or to provide context 
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Once you gain an understanding of their needs for information, support, and learning within their workflow, you can prepare for the next step in building your informal learning strategy.


Read the full article here.

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SlideShare Classic: 8 Reasons to Focus on Informal Learning

SlideShare Classic:  8 Reasons to Focus on Informal Learning | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Informal and social learning is core to successful learning.  These 8 classic reasons still apply today."

8 reasons to focus on informal learning.

They are:


  1. There are imperatives for informal learning
  2. Learning is a process, not a series of of events
  3. Most learning occurs outside of the classroom
  4. The vast majority of learning is social
  5. A lot of formal learning is ineffective
  6. People learn better when they are in charge
  7. There’s inherent inertia in formal approaches
  8. Informal and social learning are cost-effective

Deb's related posts:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Oldie but a goodie, as the conversation on informal and social learning is still current.  We still have a long way to go.  ~  Deb

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