Agile Learning
Follow
Find tag "intelligence"
3.3K views | +1 today
Agile Learning
How learning and education is changing to meet our needs today and tomorrow.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from PREDA - They learn, You Grow
Scoop.it!

Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence”

Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence” | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Fascinating nuggets from the book summary of Collective Intelligence by Pierre Lévy (click through post here to locate & enlarge the chart):

 

The premise: Humankind must acknowledge the potential of cyberspace to enable beneficial new forms of complex collective thought, collective expression, and social organization.
 

Technology makes this feasible (p. 246). The author's ideas are reminiscent of:

  • Vannevar Bush‘s collective memory
  • Marshall McLuhan‘s notion of a forthcoming “global village”
  • Douglas Engelbart‘s vision of the computer as a tool to augment human thought,
  • J. C. R. Licklider‘s plans for symbiotic human—computer networks.

   

Lévy calls for a revolution in society’s understanding of itself – the expansion of subjectivity (cf. Lévy, 2000).

   

Features:

  • Multi-modal and dynamic (p. 120)
  • Virtual worlds instruments of self-knowledge and self-definition 
  • Deterritorialized with self-organization
  • Continuous self-invention of human communities
  • Computer-aided imagination 
  • The collective can choose to foster & encourage individuality
    
From another reviewer:
 
Levy begins with the premise that the prosperity of any nation or other entity depends on their ability to navigate the knowledge space, and ... knowledge space will displace the spaces of the (natural) earth, (political) territory, or (economic) commodity. 

Via Pierre Levy, Frederic DOMON
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

One word: Fascinating! (nod to Mr. Spock)


The language of the post & the book itself is academic, yet the ideas are wonder producing.  I think we are seeing the first signs of what Lévy describes in social media, gaming and in group processes like Open Space Technology, among other things.  ~  D

more...
María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, January 14, 2014 4:50 AM

Great one.

Miguel Angel Perez Alvarez's curator insight, January 14, 2014 2:14 PM

Inteligencia colectiva, evolución

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 2014 11:18 PM

Cyberspace big thoughts, and perhaps indicating a fusion or an evolution of knowledge management in a group space.

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead?

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Is it really about teaching more, in less time, with shrinking budgets?  Or are we doing our brains & our bottom line a disservice, including conference event planning?"  


This is a great post on how to leverage learning that sticks, is sticky, vs. a spray and pray approach that still, unfortunately, dominates training programs and many conference events.


Here's an excerpt of this great post by 


Fresh thinking about how we learn
There are two kinds of learning. Learning physical tasks, like how to snowboard...embedded through repetition in the deeper motor regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia. This is known as procedural memory.


For workplace learning to be useful, we need to be able to recall ideas easily. 


In the last decade, Neuroscientists discovered that whether an idea can be easily recalled is linked to the strength of activation of the hippocampus during a learning task.


Many corporate training programs are the mental equivalent of trying to eat a week of meals in a day.


With this finding, scientists such as Lila Davachi at NYU and others have been able to test out many variables involved in learning experiences, such as what happens to the hippocampus if you distract people while absorbing information.


Over a few months of collaboration, Lila Davachi and I, along with Tobias Keifer, a consultant from Booz & Co., found a useful pattern that summarized the four biggest factors that determined the quality of recall. These are:

  • Attention, 
  • Generation, 
  • Emotion and 
  • Spacing, or the ‘AGES’ model. 

The AGES model was first presented at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit, and then published in the 2010 NeuroLeadership Journal. Read the full post including Learning that lasts through AGES that has a summary of this important research here.


more...
No comment yet.