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Efficiency in Learning, Clarified with 5 Critiques: What is Flipped Learning?

Efficiency in Learning, Clarified with 5 Critiques: What is Flipped Learning? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it


...the Flipped Learning method has created quite a stir.  Here's are some responses to criticisms, using twitter as a source.


_______________

   

The instructor does not prepare to teach material that the class already understands.

   

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Dr. Eric Mazur of Harvard University has been researching this type of learning since the early ’90s, and other educators have been applying pieces of the Flipped Learning method for even longer.

[First, it's important to start with a common] definition of what Flipped Learning is [via] Dr. Mazur’s work including:

  • Students prepare for class by watching video, listening to podcasts, reading articles, or contemplating questions that access their prior knowledge.


  • ...students then are asked to reflect upon what they have learned and organize questions and areas of confusion.


  • Students then log in to a Facebook-like social tool, where they post their questions. 


  • The instructor sorts through these questions ...organizes them, and develops class material and scenarios that address the various areas of confusion. The instructor does not prepare to teach material that the class already understands.
     
  • The instructor uses a Socratic method of teaching, where questions and problems are posed and students work together to answer the questions or solve the problems. The role of the instructor is to listen to conversations and engage with individuals and groups as needed.


_______________

     

[Techniques include]....how to quiz ...and provide them with immediate feedback...within the same video ...[and] …combines video clips with [how to use]  Google Forms to gather feedback...as part of a cycle of inquiry.

   

_______________


Excerpts from the  5 critiques include:


Implementing the Flipped Learning method makes me, as the teacher, much less important. 

This could not be further from the truth! …teachers are more important than ever.
 

Kids do not want to sit at home watching boring video lectures on the Web. …This is just a lot of excitement over bad pedagogy.    We completely agree… …Audio and video should be used in short, five- to 10-minute segments, [with] opportunities for students to interact with the information in these videos in a variety of ways. …For example…Jac De Haan demonstrates …how to quiz students [with YouTube videos] and provide them with immediate feedback and explanation within the same video. Ramsey Musallam …combines video clips with Google Forms to gather feedback from his students. Both of these methods can be used as part of a cycle of inquiry.
 

Other critiques with replies include:

3) No internet access, 4) accountability questions and 5) having the time and expertise to produce the needed videos to teach in this newer way.


Read more here.


Photo source:  Vanguard Visions


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Clarity is often a missing element in adapting and innovating.  This useful piece provides both clarity and examples of innovations to deal with status quo resistance to adaptive change in learning.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2:27 PM

This post covers both a clarification of what Flipped Learning really is, as well as how to respond to common complaints about helping it work.  It demonstrates response to resistance to change in learning quite nicely, including innovative examples of what works.

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Not The Same Old Garden Path - How We Can Literally Think Differently - TanveerNaseer.com

Not The Same Old Garden Path - How We Can Literally Think Differently - TanveerNaseer.com | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
Best-selling author William A. Donius shares what neuroscience has revealed about how we can learn to literally think differently to be more innovative.


The process of using the non-dominant hand, considering a question and allowing an answer to flow forth from that hand without consciously thinking about it, is in effect, walking yourself down a new garden path – a truly amazing experience. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

How to think differently, using your body in a different way, is VERY helpful to agile learning.  ~  D

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Deborah Long's curator insight, July 6, 2013 8:57 PM

Drawing on both sides of the brain particularly the non dominant side opens one to new experiences and ways of thinking.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, July 11, 2013 1:20 PM
Breaking through our patterned thinking is essential to adaptive and agile learning, esp. when we don't know what we don't know." Getting out of that comfort zone is a challenge, books like this help.
Free Your Mind's curator insight, July 31, 2013 1:00 AM

Neuroplasticity has proven that we can really re-train our brains for just about everything.  Given the right amount of effort and time you really can train yourself to react differently and be happier.  It's worth trying!

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HR is ripe for social disruption. Peer sharing & learning within HR structures to support innovative organizations

HR is ripe for social disruption.  Peer sharing & learning within HR structures to support innovative organizations | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Is it finally Time for Social HR? What's out there that uses social systems to revitalize how people are recruited and learn, grow and develop within organizations?


If organizations tend to be hidebound against change, Human Resources (HR) is even more so, in spite of the trendy strategic HR spin of the early 2000's . Consider HR's roots, which persists: labor relations, compensation, employment/personnel and the number of lawyers on staff.


Here's some fresh thinking about injecting social into HR systems.


Excerpted, adapted:


Knowledge Sharing: Forget the idea of databases acting as “repositories” of knowledge, internal social networks can capture employees work activity as social intranets – and team members can follow what others are doing on their activity streams. Newer tools like Opzi and MindQuilt can also emerge as a enterprise version of Quora, the popular Q&A site.


Recruitment:  HR has been quick to leverage social media to “Broadcast” vacancies. The next level would be actively creating and nurturing communities of practice shaped around skills where hiring managers can gauge level of skills of people and also develop them (Disclaimer: The author works with BraveNewTalent, a platform that helps organizations do that)


HR policies: Using a social tool which leverages crowdsourcing ideas from employees can help HR in co-creating processes and policies – and raise acceptability when they are finally rolled out. Dell’s EmployeeStorm is a great example by which employees give ideas on everything in the company.

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Catching Up Business: STEAM Blends Science & the Arts in Public Education

Catching Up Business:  STEAM Blends Science & the Arts in Public Education | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

STEAM Blends Science and the Arts including the 2013 example from the Wall Street Journal today of eighth-grade students in Brooklyn are learning to build cameras and getting practice composing images as part of a new class that combines technology and the arts.

     

 _____________________________
   
"the innovative practices of art and design play an essential role in improving STEM education and advancing STEM research."

    

_____________________________

       

The original news is 2011:

...Federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of Education and the National Science Foundation, are helping to fuel work in [STEAM.]

    

The NSF has provided research grants and underwritten a number of conferences and workshops around the nation this year, including a forum hosted by the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design, titled "Bridging STEM to STEAM: Developing New Frameworks for Art-Science-Design Pedagogy."

    

Picking up on the Rhode Island institution's push for STEAM, in late September, a lawmaker from that state, U.S. Rep. James Langevin, a Democrat, introduced a House resolution to highlight how "the innovative practices of art and design play an essential role in improving STEM education and advancing STEM research."

    

Source:      Building STEAM: Blending the Arts With STEM Subjects: Goals are creativity and engagement Robelen, Erik W. Education Week  31.13 (Dec 7, 2011): 8.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've been aware of STEAM for awhile.  It's good to see WSJ reporting on it at the 8th grade level, circa 2013.  The news is that this is older news, circa 2011 via the other examples above.   It remains to be seen if the industrial mindset will advance to truly embrance creative and entrepreneurial and innovative thinking.  

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Inquiry Learning Vs. Standardized Content: Can They Coexist?

Inquiry Learning Vs. Standardized Content: Can They Coexist? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it


"Increasingly, any standards-based curriculum is at odds with the outside world.  Is sticking to content standards still appropriate?"


Beyond the core literacies of reading, writing, computation, and research, the world-wide culture of innovation, discovery, multi-polarity, interdisciplinary thinking, and rapid change depends on the explosive potential of the human mind, not entombed truths from the past.


....how can you, as a teacher, help move the dialogue forward? First, you can focus on becoming a highly-effective project based learning (PBL) teacher.


But PBL is the near-term solution. The ultimate destination is to align education with the requirements of a process-based world. 


Via MindShift


Via Stephanie Sandifer
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Intrigued by the question and the process-based recommendation.  What do you think?  ~  D

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Talent is irrelevant and so 1971... What makes for a talented group and innovative result?

Talent is irrelevant and so 1971...  What makes for a talented group and innovative result? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

At least, the author admits, talent is less relevant TODAY in this blog post:


  • Less work is being done by individuals and more work is being done by groups
   
  • Nobel prizes are increasingly awarded to multiple individuals, research papers increasingly cite numerous individuals
   
  • Inside our organizations more projects and objectives are anchored to groups of people. 
_____________________
 
   ...our three most wasted assets inside the organization are knowledge, perspectives and heuristics…inside a persons brain, the mash-up of their identity and experience.
    
______________________
    
Excerpts:
    

Individual ability / competence / talent are one variable among many in the equation. Putting a group of talented individuals at a table together does not make a talented group.

   

Relational skills, communication skills, empathy, flexibility…all of these are part of the equation as well.  And so is diversity.

   

Very likely our three most wasted assets inside the organization are knowledge, perspectives and heuristics…the stuff inside a persons brain, the mash-up of their identity and experience.

   

When you bring a group together to do serious work, the bigger your aggregate collection of knowledge, perspectives and heuristics is, the more likely you are to have access to the tools necessary to generate an optimal result and the less likely you are to be limited and compromised by shared blind spots.

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