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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Keeping it Real: 4 Points to be Flexible in Teaching, Jane Elliot's Famous Experiment

Keeping it Real:  4 Points to be Flexible in Teaching, Jane Elliot's Famous Experiment | Agile Learning | Scoop.it


How to make it clear, satisfying, concrete, and real - including Jane Elliot's Famous Experiment and the impact it still has today in the third point, #3.  It's worth a re-read every so often to remember.
 

1) Make it clear

When I was a journalist, [I used] the inverted pyramid structure....the upper part …. represents the most important facts, ….and the lower part ...represents additional information …in order of diminishing importance. The pyramid [has] three sections: the “lead”, “body”, and “tail."  ...frame your...“lead” around a problem to be solved or an enquiry to be investigated...  [C]oncentrate on writing questions...  [W]rite a “big question” which forms the basis for the lesson. 

       

2) Make it satisfying

       

…Once I’ve opened a gap in my knowledge I must fill it; once a problem has been brought to my attention, I must solve it. This explains why I watched Disaster Movie through to the bitter end. Piquing curiosity … is also key to effective teaching. ….start by highlighting the knowledge they are missing. Another technique is to start a lesson by asking students to make a prediction.

    

3)  Make it concrete   [The Experiment]

        

…ensure your ideas “stick” by making them tangible. ...Take, for example, Jane Elliott’s famous “blue-eyed/brown-eyed” experiment with third grade students the day after Martin Luther King had been assassinated in 1968. 

       

....Most of Elliott’s students were, like her, born and raised in a small town in Iowa, and were not normally exposed to Black people. ....she divided the class into the brown-eyed and the blue-eyed children. She said the blue-eyed children were the superior group, provided brown fabric collars and asked the blue-eyed students to wrap them around the necks of their brown-eyed peers as a method of easily identifying the minority group. She gave the blue-eyed children extra privileges, such as second helpings at lunch, access to the new jungle gym, and five extra minutes at recess.   

    

….eventually those who were deemed “superior” became arrogant, bossy and otherwise unpleasant to their “inferior” classmates. Their grades also improved, doing mathematical and reading tasks that had seemed outside their ability before. The “inferior” classmates also transformed into timid and subservient children who even during recess isolated themselves, including those who had previously been dominant in the class. These children’s academic performance suffered, even with tasks that had been simple before. 

     

Once she had concluded the experiment, she asked the children to reflect by writing down what they had learned and it became clear that her students had come to deeply understand racism because Elliot had made it feel real, she had grounded an abstract concept in sensory reality and thus engaged her students’ emotions.

     

(DN:  See my comment below for a link to the impact of this experiment decades later on the children who were in the original class.)
      

4) Make it real

     

...Metaphor is good at making ideas stick because it brings ideas to life, it draws connections between new knowledge and existing knowledge.  For example, if you are trying to describe how electricity flows through a material, you’ll need to explain the structure of atoms. You might first use a metaphor which describes atoms as “nature’s building blocks” to help your students understand an atom’s function.

     

As always in REVELN ScoopIt news, click on the photo to see the full post.

Related posts by Deb:

    

    

     

    

      
  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The standout here is the controversial and visceral story of Jane Elliot's controversial blue-eye, brown-eyed experiment.  A paper that described the lasting effects of this experience is here, quoting the students in the original classroom some 40+ years later.  So as for concrete (and real) we have Ray Hansen,
     
…now 43 and an attorney in Rochester, Minnesota, says that because of Jane, “I go out of my way to offer a kind word to people of color. I don’t think I would do that if not for Jane. What Jane taught is woven into the fabric of my being. You cannot underestimate the impact that such an experience has had on us.

      

I don’t know how anyone who went through the experience can say that they have not been changed. Jane must get the credit she deserves for making the world a better place, and making us better human beings.”

      
Concrete and real, indeed.  ~  Deb 

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Adapting Executive Learning: How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence'

Adapting Executive Learning:  How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence' | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

A new perspective on change including: Creating Infectious Action, great experiential learning to inspire change, and Stanford's d.school.


______________

Scaling Up Excellence
 ....never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.

______________


Stanford Biz School Professor Huggy Rao and I spent seven years working on Scaling Up Excellenceto be published in early February. The d.school and the book are deeply intertwined – it never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.


In 2006 we moved into our first dedicated teaching space – a double-wide trailer on the Stanford campus. A big and often unruly gang of us taught a class that is now called Bootcamp for the first time that January.


...Over 20 people were on the teaching team for 60 students).  ...I was talking a lot (often over a glass of wine) with Stanford Business School colleague Huggy Rao — who had just arrived at Stanford...about the madness of the d.school, how our goal was to create great experiential learning.

    

  • Huggy, a design thinker at heart, immediately asked the “and” question “suppose we did an executive program that combined traditional classroom education in the mornings AND that hands on stuff you do at the d.school in the afternoons.”
  

Huggy convinced Stanford to take a risk on our crazy new program. ...We launched Customer-Focused Innovation in 2006...    30 or so executives gathered in a case style classroom at the Business School to discuss topics like leading innovation, strategy, marketing, and such.


Read more on this story here.


Related posts & tools by Deb:


      

            

         


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a new millenium case study on how new models of learning develop in higher education, amidst hide-bound academe, inspiring executives who may bring in with them old patterns, yet are open to new modes of learning.


There is hopefulness for our own capacity for change in reading this adaptive learning story.  ~  Deb

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Create-Learning » Results vs. Process. Achieving Goals While Improving the Work

Create-Learning » Results vs. Process. Achieving Goals While Improving the Work | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

A video is listed that examines process, vs. problems with Management by Objectives (MBOs) - it's not all about results.  LEAN is about process.   ...Have PDCA, Plan-Do-Check-Act within the leadership team.


___________________
   
Most scoreboards are focused on results.  If we don't have the results we need, what are we going to do about it?

  

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Most scoreboards are focused on results.  If we don't have the results we need, what are we going to do about it?


It's not about, like losing weight, measuring more frequently.   What processes do we need to consider?   ...MBO meetings would sometimes includes, "I don't care how you do it, just do it (get the numbers.]"


"Results without a process is luck. Process without results is waste. How are your processes driving the goals you work to achieve?"
 

The need to have people fall in love with the process of working to achieve goals as opposed to the goal itself will allow quick change and more innovation.
 

The goal is not and should not be ignored…the challenge is that the processes being used to achieve the goal need to be evaluated to ensure you are working to achieve the goal.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This timeline shows missing elements with problematic MBOs.  it's good to see this Knowledge Management piece on putting process & results together.

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David Hain's curator insight, February 3, 2014 2:46 AM

Nice matrix on intentional success.

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Double-Loop Learning with Derek W. Wade and Susan Eller

Double-Loop Learning with Derek W. Wade and Susan Eller | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
Derek W. Wade and Susan Eller discuss double-loop learning, Chris Argyris, frames, simulations, hospitals, mental models and why double-loop learning is so much more bad-ass than single loop learning.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The format for this video and transcript on two testimonials to putting Chris Agyris' work into practice is intriguing, as is the format of this tech-based, yet learning friendly post.  ~ Deb

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