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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Adapting Executive Learning: How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence'

Adapting Executive Learning:  How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence' | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

A new perspective on change including: Creating Infectious Action, great experiential learning to inspire change, and Stanford's d.school.


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Scaling Up Excellence
 ....never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.

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Stanford Biz School Professor Huggy Rao and I spent seven years working on Scaling Up Excellenceto be published in early February. The d.school and the book are deeply intertwined – it never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.


In 2006 we moved into our first dedicated teaching space – a double-wide trailer on the Stanford campus. A big and often unruly gang of us taught a class that is now called Bootcamp for the first time that January.


...Over 20 people were on the teaching team for 60 students).  ...I was talking a lot (often over a glass of wine) with Stanford Business School colleague Huggy Rao — who had just arrived at Stanford...about the madness of the d.school, how our goal was to create great experiential learning.

    

  • Huggy, a design thinker at heart, immediately asked the “and” question “suppose we did an executive program that combined traditional classroom education in the mornings AND that hands on stuff you do at the d.school in the afternoons.”
  

Huggy convinced Stanford to take a risk on our crazy new program. ...We launched Customer-Focused Innovation in 2006...    30 or so executives gathered in a case style classroom at the Business School to discuss topics like leading innovation, strategy, marketing, and such.


Read more on this story here.


Related posts & tools by Deb:


      

            

         


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a new millenium case study on how new models of learning develop in higher education, amidst hide-bound academe, inspiring executives who may bring in with them old patterns, yet are open to new modes of learning.


There is hopefulness for our own capacity for change in reading this adaptive learning story.  ~  Deb

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Peer Learning Circles - What are they?

Peer Learning Circles - What are they? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Peer Learning  embraces learning from your peers’ experiences and insights.

It is working with like-minded individuals that want to cooperatively develop their knowledge and expertise based on shared experiences, ingenuity and creativity. 


How does Peer Learning work?

Peer Learning involves a group (called a “Circle”) of anywhere from 8 to 15 people.  [It may be people from all of one strata, such as Executive Directors] meeting on a regular (monthly) basis, and discussing issues of common concern or interest.


Over the course of several meetings, participants develop a strong level of trust and familiarity with their peers in the Circle, which facilitates effective sharing and powerfully supportive dialogue among all participants.


The Circle meetings are managed by an experienced facilitator, to ensure that agreed ground rules are followed, and that all participants benefit from the process. While structured, the sessions are generally free-flowing, fast-paced and energizing.


Veterans of past Peer Learning offerings commonly report that it is the most significant professional development opportunity that they have experienced.


What does the Circle discuss?

The Circle members decide this for themselves at each meeting, setting the topic of discussion for the following meeting.


Depending on the topic agreed upon, the facilitator may select one or two resource articles to circulate to the group in advance of the next meeting, in order to provide basic information and context for the discussion.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I was asked by a local peer executive coach to recommend someone who had this specific expertise.  An experienced facilitator knows how to do this, however, this is the first time I've heard of Peer Learning Circles developed as if it were a trademark.  In the UK, it Peer Circles is a registered name.  ~  Deb

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