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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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MOOCs Revolutionize Corporate Learning and Development

MOOCs Revolutionize Corporate Learning and Development | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

McAfee turned its training around that both saved both time and produced more lucrative sales: ...an average of $500,000 per year in sales [attributed to] new training model.


Before Intel giant McAfee revamped its new-hire orientation, ...80 hours long [with] ... 40 hours of pre-work,, 5 days of on-site training, and ...post-...to be completed at home.


To fix its problem, McAfee turned to ....Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs...called “flipping the classroom” [where]...a majority of learning happens ...by giving students access to course materials and having them probe, discuss, and debate issues with fellow learners as well as the professor.


_________________________

Companies ...have to trust the learner ...incorporating more opportunities for peer reviews and peer-to-peer dialogues...

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...Can your company re-imagine the role of the learner? ...the learner takes on a role more expansive than ever before, acting as teacher, learner, and peer reviewer.


Companies ...have to trust the learner to do this,  by incorporating more opportunities for peer reviews and peer-to-peer dialogues into the course.


With that change, McAfee turned its training around in a way that both saved both time and produced more lucrative sales: its sales associates now attribute an average of $500,000 per year in sales to the skills they learned through the new training model. 


Three MOOC elements are particularly well-suited to corporate learning & development:  Semi-synchronicity  (cohorts ...[can] motivate each other as they go through the program),  course design (flipping the classroom), and credentials

    In a recent Future Workplace survey, completed by 195 corporate learning and HR professionals, 70 percent of respondents said they saw opportunities to integrate MOOCs into their own company’s learning programs. Even further, this sample of respondents made six recommendations for how MOOC providers could adapt to needs of corporations:


    Related posts by Deb:


       
       


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This well-done piece by Jeanne Meister, highlights key elements of how MOOCs can turn around the stultifying aspects of corporate learning, well-illustrated through the McAfee example. 

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    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, August 21, 2013 12:49 PM

    Semi-synchronicity  (cohorts ...[can] motivate each other as they go through the program),  course design (flipping the classroom), and credentials.

    IanHelps's curator insight, August 26, 2013 9:19 AM

    MOOCs might be just what the corporate L&D world needs to reinvent itself. McAfee appears to be at the leading edge of this change

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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    The 70:20:10 Framework

    The 70:20:10 Framework for Building Workforce Capability. Uploaded August 2011. (c) 2011 Charles Jennings, 702010Forum
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    What's current, leaving ADDIE in history.  Chief Learning Officer circles worthy.  ~  D

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    Karen Schmidt's curator insight, August 3, 2013 3:32 AM

    ... lets get their with peer learning AND a collaboration learning loop

    Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Transformational Leadership
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    A Vision of Leadership Development for the 21st Century

    A Vision of Leadership Development for the 21st Century | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

    "...a group of people, passionate about leadership, gathered together to reflect on current leadership development."

    a key theme emerged… under­stand­ing the self was cru­cial to lead­er­ship development.


    Other dis­cus­sion points emerged about the next gen­er­a­tion, their pas­sions and there­fore their pos­si­ble needs; sus­tain­abil­ity, global teams and moral lead­er­ship in the post cap­i­tal­ist paradigm.


    Not to men­tion the role of reflec­tion and silence to facil­i­tate deci­sion mak­ing and self-management.

     


    Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This format reminds me of elements of "Presencing."  As  far as the key theme, of course!  ~  Deb

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    Thomas Gelmi's curator insight, March 10, 2013 2:25 PM

    Key sentence for me: under­stand­ing the self is cru­cial to lead­er­ship development.

    Thomas Gelmi's comment, March 28, 2013 5:03 PM
    Agree - there are some parallels with theory U, in which presencing is a key element.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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    Why "Learning Agility" matters & how to increase it

    Why "Learning Agility" matters & how to increase it | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

    "What is Learning Agility?  “The ability and willingness to learn from experience, and subsequently apply that learning.”  


    Excerpted by a post by Paul Thoresen:

     It is this application of learning which differentiates those who have high potential from those who do not. Using this definition of Learning Agility includes a five factor multi-dimensional construct with several sub-factors (or dimensions). This description of the five main factors is adapted from Korn/Ferry International:

    1. Mental – The ability to think critically and be very comfortable with complexity.
    2. People – A skilled communicator and adept at perspective taking.
    3. Results – Achievement oriented and builder of productive teams.
    4. Change – Comfortable with change and seeks continuous improvement.
    5. Self-Awareness – Knows strengths and weaknesses; actively seeks blind spot information.


    Lombardo and Eichinger estimate Learning Agility is high in 10% of the population. .... evidence suggests Learning Agility can be developed. It is not a trait you are stuck with; it can be increased with practice.

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Guest blogger Paul also cites 7 learning agility resources for additional depth.  ~  Deb

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    Paul Thoresen's comment, August 21, 2013 9:55 AM
    Thank you for sharing Deb!
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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    SlideShare Classic: 8 Reasons to Focus on Informal Learning

    SlideShare Classic:  8 Reasons to Focus on Informal Learning | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

    "Informal and social learning is core to successful learning.  These 8 classic reasons still apply today."

    8 reasons to focus on informal learning.

    They are:


    1. There are imperatives for informal learning
    2. Learning is a process, not a series of of events
    3. Most learning occurs outside of the classroom
    4. The vast majority of learning is social
    5. A lot of formal learning is ineffective
    6. People learn better when they are in charge
    7. There’s inherent inertia in formal approaches
    8. Informal and social learning are cost-effective

    Deb's related posts:


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Oldie but a goodie, as the conversation on informal and social learning is still current.  We still have a long way to go.  ~  Deb

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    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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    HR is ripe for social disruption. Peer sharing & learning within HR structures to support innovative organizations

    HR is ripe for social disruption.  Peer sharing & learning within HR structures to support innovative organizations | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

    Is it finally Time for Social HR? What's out there that uses social systems to revitalize how people are recruited and learn, grow and develop within organizations?


    If organizations tend to be hidebound against change, Human Resources (HR) is even more so, in spite of the trendy strategic HR spin of the early 2000's . Consider HR's roots, which persists: labor relations, compensation, employment/personnel and the number of lawyers on staff.


    Here's some fresh thinking about injecting social into HR systems.


    Excerpted, adapted:


    Knowledge Sharing: Forget the idea of databases acting as “repositories” of knowledge, internal social networks can capture employees work activity as social intranets – and team members can follow what others are doing on their activity streams. Newer tools like Opzi and MindQuilt can also emerge as a enterprise version of Quora, the popular Q&A site.


    Recruitment:  HR has been quick to leverage social media to “Broadcast” vacancies. The next level would be actively creating and nurturing communities of practice shaped around skills where hiring managers can gauge level of skills of people and also develop them (Disclaimer: The author works with BraveNewTalent, a platform that helps organizations do that)


    HR policies: Using a social tool which leverages crowdsourcing ideas from employees can help HR in co-creating processes and policies – and raise acceptability when they are finally rolled out. Dell’s EmployeeStorm is a great example by which employees give ideas on everything in the company.

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