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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Talent and Performance Development
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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on People , then Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on People , then Results | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

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Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:


See the companion post about Holacracy, here.


As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:
 

     

    

    

     

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams, delivered once a month via email.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

         

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2:50 PM

Holacracies, wirearchies and feedback rich cultures are one of the key ways organizations can adapt to disruptive change, or so it is beginning to look.   It will take solid leadership to change the nature of control and power in new millenium organizations, with unconventional larger organizations. like Zappos, leading the way.  ~  D

Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 1:46 PM

well worth the reading time.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 7:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
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Pinterest THIS, Curators: How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular

Pinterest THIS, Curators:  How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Pinterest THIS!  It's an opportunity to channel your connect-the-dots ability into absorbing this prescient piece from Brain Pickings.

 

It may strike you as sophisticated & illuminating  or wandering and confusing, depending on how it grabs your favorites or introduces you to unknown history.  

 

Some excerpted nuggets:

"...contemporary visual culture:  the convergence of highbrow and lowbrow, the vernacular of advertising, the dynamics of newspaper and magazine publishing, the creation of avant-garde mass culture, and a wealth in between."

 

"The purpose of this inventory is to draw a circle around a body of objects; to take stock of their common properties; and to tell a story about where they came from, what they were, and where they led.

 

Their variety is such as to sustain a multiplicity of narrative threads: about

  • the rise of a new photo-driven graphic vernacular;  
  • the triumph of a certain cognitive/cultural style;  
  • criss-crossing between high and low,  
  • erudite and the mass cultural;  
  • the shifting boundaries between books, magazines, music, television, and film.” 
.

Referred:  for the Information Age via @piscitelli


Via juandoming
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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
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The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."


HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see that there may be some updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.


Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:


"...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."


____________________________


How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

____________________________


MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 


What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.


Our data show that great teams:


Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 


...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.


Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.



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