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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
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"We help each other be expert." Social Media to learn, teach, research – Full Video

Difficult polymath problem?  "...The discussion would go until they solved the problem.   ...We are all experts...  We help each other be expert."

Autonomy, privacy, platforms, research, complexity, sharing incuding solving a complex math problem - solving problems collaboratively.


Video of the Cristina Costa session, Social Media for learning, teaching and researching at the University of Liverpool on 9th February 2012 - full video.


From the Univ. of Liverpool describing this session:


  • Cristina is the Learning and Research Technologies Manager at the University of Salford and was named the Learning Technologist of the year in 2010 (Association for Learning Technology). the seminar was for teachers-researchers who have heard of social media but do not have a great deal of experience with it.
   
  • Cristina challenged the approach to using the web ‘as a book’ – just as a place to go and ‘look things up’. 
   
  • She encouraged us to view the web as a place to set up challenges and inquiries for students, to use its social personal(ised) potential and overall to use the web to create.  To contribute not just to consume.  
   
  • The session was really well received, full of ideas and links to new practical choices.  


Related posts by Deb:  



     




Via MonVall, juandoming
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cristina Costa covers many themes including the problems with using Facebook and what tools work better, and complex polymath problem solving through collaboration.  ~  D

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Content Curation World
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Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus

Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Blogging, great content vs. Curation, great topics + great content, AND useful data / content infographic, for your pondering pleasure."


Another great shared curation piece from Robin Good and Deanna Dahlsad at Kitsch-Slapped:


Excerpts:


Robin Good: If curation is all about finding and sharing great content, what's the difference with what so many bloggers have been doing until now?

The difference, according to Deanna Dahlsad at Kitsch-Slapped, is in the focus. While bloggers often cover just about anything that intercepts their online wanderings, curators are characterized by a strong focus on a specific topic.  


Here is a key passage from her article: "Many bloggers spend their time selecting what they consider the best of what other people have created on the web and post it at their own sites, just like a magazine or newspaper.


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Because content curation is expected to be based on such focused filtering, it begins...based on topic selection.

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Or they provide a mix of this along with writing or otherwise creating their own content. Not to split hairs, but curation involves less creation and more searching and sifting; curation’s more a matter of focused filtering than it is writing.


Because content curation is expected to be based on such focused filtering, it begins far more based on topic selection.


This is much different from blogging, where bloggers are often advised to “just begin” and let their voice and interests accumulate over time to eventually reveal a primary theme.


While blogging success may be thought of in many different ways, the success of content curation lies in how well you define, search/research, and stick to your subject."


Rightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/2012/06/facts-questions-on-blogging-curating-collecting/ 


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's comment, June 19, 2012 4:21 PM
Thank you Deanna for writing it!
AnneMarie Cunningham's curator insight, March 14, 2013 2:13 PM

another explanation of curation

Everett Hudson's comment, March 22, 2013 10:50 AM
you have great ideas. more please!
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Curation & Blogging, Business Lessons Learned & Curator Prescience, 2012

A choice in social media for business today is blogging or curation, or some of both, or developing a hybrid. How do you make smart choices among traditional and the newest social media tools?


Curation to deal with Social Media Overload:  It's a theme in my new, tailored video presented this month to the local Lunch Ann Arbor Marketing, @LA2M group, focusing on the differences between blogging and curation.


Curation is not filtering, it's not aggregating, it's functioning as a librarian of current and classic content, which allows others into the curation process curate with you, to help avoid "filter bubble" syndrome (I've blogged & have a Move.on video on the subject.)  ScoopIt enables the co-creation curation function as one of the newer curation platforms out there.


I also mention in my video, both Beth Kanter, a respected blogger in non-profit circles, and Robin Good, who was just interviewed by Beth.  This seems to be a prescient convergence to me.


LA2M also archives most of their presentation, so my presentation partner, JT, has his slides and our UStream video archived here, so you can access our combined, recent curationg presentation.


What do you think about curation?  What are your questions?



~ Deb


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Suggested by Frederic DOMON
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The Stupid Company? Is Collective Intelligence a Myth? Call for papers: The #eCollab Blog Carnival

The Stupid Company?  Is Collective Intelligence a Myth?  Call for papers: The #eCollab Blog Carnival | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

In theory, everyone is for the learning organization or the mobilization of collective intelligence.   How could you be against it? Would that make you in favour of the "stupid organization"?


eCollab Blog Carnival post suggested by Frederic Domon. It looks like a great idea. ~ Deb


Few organizations have developed a model for a sustainable learning organization.


So, is collective intelligence a myth? What are the reasons for successive failures at attempts to implement the learning organization? How can this be fixed?

Please join us in this discussion!

If you wish to participate (2 choices):

Do you have a blog?


  • Respond with an article you publish on your blog. Send an email to fdomon (at) entreprisecollaborative.com or a tweet to @hjarche or @fdomon to make sure we do not forget your article.
 
 
  • If you use Twitter, send a message linked to your post using the hashtag #ecollab
  
  • We will publish all articles, or excerpts of them on the site. This will make for easier reading of the blog carnival. We will link to the original article and will contact you for a short bio and photo to include with the article
  


You do not have a blog but this interests you?

   

Send your article directly to fdomon (at) entreprisecollaborative.com. We will then publish it.
   

Good blog Carnival and thank you in advance for your participation. - Frederic Domon.

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from A New Society, a new education!
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Pinterest THIS, Curators: How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular

Pinterest THIS, Curators:  How McLuhan, Agel, and Fiore Created a New Visual Vernacular | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Pinterest THIS!  It's an opportunity to channel your connect-the-dots ability into absorbing this prescient piece from Brain Pickings.

 

It may strike you as sophisticated & illuminating  or wandering and confusing, depending on how it grabs your favorites or introduces you to unknown history.  

 

Some excerpted nuggets:

"...contemporary visual culture:  the convergence of highbrow and lowbrow, the vernacular of advertising, the dynamics of newspaper and magazine publishing, the creation of avant-garde mass culture, and a wealth in between."

 

"The purpose of this inventory is to draw a circle around a body of objects; to take stock of their common properties; and to tell a story about where they came from, what they were, and where they led.

 

Their variety is such as to sustain a multiplicity of narrative threads: about

  • the rise of a new photo-driven graphic vernacular;  
  • the triumph of a certain cognitive/cultural style;  
  • criss-crossing between high and low,  
  • erudite and the mass cultural;  
  • the shifting boundaries between books, magazines, music, television, and film.” 
.

Referred:  for the Information Age via @piscitelli


Via juandoming
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