Agile Learning
Follow
Find tag "agile"
3.0K views | +0 today
Agile Learning
How learning and education is changing to meet our needs today and tomorrow.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

A True Learning Culture: Fixing Your Social Learning Network

A True Learning Culture:  Fixing Your Social Learning Network | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Employees say they get more out of informal learning, but many social learning programs fail to engage. Here’s what you can do to change that."
 

It’s about setting expectations and enabling success.
 

Social learning  [is] informal learning. ...


These included: job shadowing, peer-to-peer learning, attending cross-departmental meetings and similar self-managed learning opportunities. When surveyed, employees felt that the informal opportunities were just as valuable, if not more, than the formal learning opportunities.

______________
   
All employees need searchable profiles, collaboration tools like...screen share and file sharing, forums for sharing knowledge and ideally, some level of integration between all of these.   
______________
 


Included: 


2. Empower employees to share: Employees are the No. 1 source of knowledge...at any organization. Sett clear expectation that employees should share their knowledge with each other is the first step toward building peer-to-peer learning networks. ...Encourage employees to set up their own training sessions....peer-to-peer or large groups. If employees need to go through human resources or the training department, this can only hold up the process and momentum.
    

3. Provide the tools: All employees need searchable profiles, collaboration tools like video chat, screen share and file sharing, forums for sharing knowledge and ideally, some level of integration between all of these.  [So] many sophisticated organizations still lack some of the most basic collaboration tools.
       

4. Recognize the effort: Recognize, and even reward, those who participate and contribute. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

          

      

     

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

                   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There is still hesitancy in fully embracing informal peer to peer learning in organizations.  The phrase in this piece, "Recognize, and even reward... those who participate" gives a hint of this.  


Letting go of the traditional control mechanisms to reconfigure informal learning, and tie it to learning goals and skills areas, like creativity, innovation and cross boundary sharing could be another start to agile learning.   ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Emerging Technologies News via the Horizon Report, The 2014 Higher Education Edition Video

New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) recently released  the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition.  It's part of an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education.

Fast Trends: Driving changes in higher education over the next one to two years

  • Growing Ubiquity of Social Media
  • Integration of Online, Hybrid, and Collaborative Learning

Mid-Range Trends: Driving changes in higher education within three to five years
  • Rise of Data-Driven Learning and Assessment
  • Shift from Students as Consumers to Students as Creators


Long-Range Trends: Driving changes in higher education in five or more years

  • Agile Approaches to Change   There is a growing consensus....that institutional leadership and curricula could benefit from agile startup models. 

  • Evolution of Online Learning Progress in learning analytics, adaptive learning, and a combination of cutting-edge asynchronous and synchronous tools will continue to advance the state of online learning... though many of these are still the subjects of experiments and research.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Trend watching!  This is useful for any type of forecasting for higher education, with implications for anyone involved in learning and technology.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

17 Steps To Acquiring A New Skill Faster Than You Thought Possible

17 Steps To Acquiring A New Skill Faster Than You Thought Possible | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Excited about learning a new skill?  17 strategies including approaches from a noted, rapid learning expert.


Excerpted, a curated, top level list 7 of the 17 strategies listed:



1. Deconstruct & Reverse Engineer

Break it down into little pieces and master an isolated portion. Ex: learning guitar, learn how to press down a chord pattern with your fingers first without even trying to strum the chord. Once you are able to change between a couple of chord patterns, then add the strumming.



2. Pareto Principle

20% work that will give you 80% of the results. Learning a language?  Do a quick search for “most commonly used French words” & learn these first.



5. Join a Group

You’ll learn from others [and] make progress together. 



8. F.O.C.U.S.

Follow one course until success! Simply focus on the one new skill at hand until you get it done.



10. Find a Mentor

Success leaves clues. …find an expert …to avoid…making the mistakes that they have made….the expert will fast-track your learning …have them personally walk you through what needs to be done. Reach out and send an email to them.



11. Sleep On It

Practice your new skill within 4 hours of going to sleep. Josh Kaufman is a noted rapid learning expert and tells us that any practice done within this time frame causes your brain to embed the learning more rapidly into its neural pathways. Your memory and motor-mechanics needed are ingrained at a quicker level.



12. The 20 Hour Rule

Along with that tip, Kaufman also suggests 20 as the magical number of hours to dedicate to learning the new skill. His reasoning is that everyone will hit a wall early on in the rapid learning stage and that “pre-committing” to 20 hours is a sure-fire way to push through that wall and acquire your new skill.

   

15. Ditch the Distractions  Ditch social media, and the temptation to check any email.   Before you ...practice, make sure whatever potential distractions are far from sight.

 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

     

  • Don't miss a thing by subscribing to Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring three gold award change-themed streams, shared once a month via email,  free here,via REVELN Tools.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's a robust list with strategies that resonate.  Consider using learning strategies that you've used in the past successfully, adding perhaps 1-2 others to ramp up your learning speed & agility.   ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Personal Knowledge Mastery
Scoop.it!

It doesn’t take 10,000 hours to learn a new skill. It takes 20. And here’s how…

It doesn’t take 10,000 hours to learn a new skill. It takes 20. And here’s how… | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

If you have 20 minutes, watch the video, it's worth it.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The insights thanks to Kenneth Mikkelsen:  

1) Deconstruct the skill.

2)  Learn enough to self correct.

3) Remove barriers [and distractions.]

4) Practice - for at least 20 hours.


Practice could be greatly aided by group coaching and accountability partners, as well as good follow-on structure.


As a team, group coach and someone acquainted with peer learning circles, this reasonates.   ~  Deb

more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 20, 2013 10:18 AM

The path to learning:


  1. Deconstruct the skill. Decide what you actually want to be able to do.
  2. Learn enough to self correct. Learn just enough that you can actually tell when you’re making a mistake.
  3. Remove Practice Barriers: i.e. remove distractions, yes, like you, Internet.
  4. Practice at least 20 hours. Finally, yep, practice for 20 hours.


Estelblau's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:27 PM

What's your opinion? Do you agree?

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 25, 2013 11:11 AM

Here's a summary of the TEDx insights, thanks to Kenneth Mikkelsen:


1) Deconstruct the skill.
2) Learn enough to self correct.
3) Remove barriers [and distractions.]
4) Practice - for at least 20 hours.


Practice could be greatly aided by group coaching and accountability partners, as well as good follow-on structure.


As a team, group coach and someone acquainted with peer learning circles, this resonates.

From Agile Learning  ~ Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

On-demand Personalized Learning, Strategic and Agile

On-demand Personalized Learning, Strategic and Agile | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Training content is moving beyond large courses, to semantically rich nuggets of information. Developers have created a whole host of specialized, next-generation performance-support apps that deliver personalized, bite-sized learning to employees at the moment-of-need on the device of their choice. But getting there is not easy.

by Dawn  Poulos : Learning Solutions Magazine


Related posts by Deb:


Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

    

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

   

Agile Leader Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through Sharp Rocks

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Useful perspective on customized, personalized learning > trend watch useful.  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

MOOCs Revolutionize Corporate Learning and Development

MOOCs Revolutionize Corporate Learning and Development | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

McAfee turned its training around that both saved both time and produced more lucrative sales: ...an average of $500,000 per year in sales [attributed to] new training model.


Before Intel giant McAfee revamped its new-hire orientation, ...80 hours long [with] ... 40 hours of pre-work,, 5 days of on-site training, and ...post-...to be completed at home.


To fix its problem, McAfee turned to ....Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs...called “flipping the classroom” [where]...a majority of learning happens ...by giving students access to course materials and having them probe, discuss, and debate issues with fellow learners as well as the professor.


_________________________

Companies ...have to trust the learner ...incorporating more opportunities for peer reviews and peer-to-peer dialogues...

_________________________


...Can your company re-imagine the role of the learner? ...the learner takes on a role more expansive than ever before, acting as teacher, learner, and peer reviewer.


Companies ...have to trust the learner to do this,  by incorporating more opportunities for peer reviews and peer-to-peer dialogues into the course.


With that change, McAfee turned its training around in a way that both saved both time and produced more lucrative sales: its sales associates now attribute an average of $500,000 per year in sales to the skills they learned through the new training model. 


Three MOOC elements are particularly well-suited to corporate learning & development:  Semi-synchronicity  (cohorts ...[can] motivate each other as they go through the program),  course design (flipping the classroom), and credentials

    In a recent Future Workplace survey, completed by 195 corporate learning and HR professionals, 70 percent of respondents said they saw opportunities to integrate MOOCs into their own company’s learning programs. Even further, this sample of respondents made six recommendations for how MOOC providers could adapt to needs of corporations:


    Related posts by Deb:


       
       


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This well-done piece by Jeanne Meister, highlights key elements of how MOOCs can turn around the stultifying aspects of corporate learning, well-illustrated through the McAfee example. 

    more...
    Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, August 21, 2013 12:49 PM

    Semi-synchronicity  (cohorts ...[can] motivate each other as they go through the program),  course design (flipping the classroom), and credentials.

    IanHelps's curator insight, August 26, 2013 9:19 AM

    MOOCs might be just what the corporate L&D world needs to reinvent itself. McAfee appears to be at the leading edge of this change

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You

    Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

    "...our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility."



    Excerpts - Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: 


    ...we all need to find ways to harness the power of randomness, volatility and extreme events to help us grow and develop more of our potential.


    Focusing on Black Swans


    Nassim Nicholas Taleb writes about black swans [including] three books: Fooled by RandomnessThe Black Swan and, now, Antifragile.


    Black Swans, in Taleb’s parlance, are “large-scale unpredictable and irregular events of massive consequence.’


    The latest book focuses on approaches that enable us to thrive from high levels of volatility, and particularly those unexpected extreme events.

    It...willl...prove infuriating to most of our economic, educational and political elites, for he argues that these elites have played a major role in making us increasingly vulnerable to volatility and Black Swans.


    ...The quest for antifragility

    The real opportunity, in Taleb’s view, is to learn and grow from volatility and unexpected events – not to return to where you were, but to become even better as a result of the exposure and experience.   


    He makes an important point: biological systems in nature are inherently antifragile – they are constantly evolving and growing stronger as a result of random events. In contrast, man-made systems tend to be fragile, they are the ones that have a hard time coping with random events.  


    Taleb highlights a key paradox: our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility.


    Related posts by Deb:


       

       

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Resilience, Robustness? - Nope.  The blog author references another author who uses nature to describe "Antifragility."   I see a parallel with the concept of Agile systems, including learning agility and "unlearning."  ~  Deb


    Photo credit:  by Tamsin Slater, Flickr CC

    more...
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 10, 2013 2:00 PM

    This post was originally Scooped in Agile Learning.  It also seems a very useful perspective for Change Management Resources with the concept "Anti-Fragile" compared to resilience and resistance.  ~  Deb


    Photo credit:  By Tamsin Slater

    Harry Cannon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:25 AM

    Are we becoming too risk averse, in projects and society? We seem less tolerant of failure, which makes us less able to deal with the setbacks that do occur.

    Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Connected Learning
    Scoop.it!

    Beyond the Stilted Webinar: 5 Essential Ingredients For Learning (SPLAT)

    Beyond the Stilted Webinar:  5 Essential Ingredients For Learning (SPLAT) | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
    I was listening to a fascinating show by Pat Flynn, blogger and podcaster who was interviewing Bryan Kelly from What The Speak on the neuroscience behind great presentations. As I thought about the...

    Via Stephanie Sandifer
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    So many webinars do NOT follow this handy SPLAT acronym.  Q & A, by "raising your hand" is not the same as "talking is learning."  We have a long ways to go to enable full conversation in webinars.  The current stay is still MUCH more lecture based.  ~  Deb

    more...
    Stephanie Sandifer's curator insight, July 27, 11:17 AM

    I consider myself to be an "experienced" educator -- that means I've spent many years in the classroom and I'm "old."  But I've never stopped trying to learn more and to be reflective about what I am doing so that I can improve how I help students learn.  

    The five ingredients listed in this blog post are fairly "spot on" in my opinion and my experience.  I would have enjoyed a post like this when I first started my teaching career.  I'm not sure if I would have fully understood all of this initially -- but it would have made it much easier to learn this in the trenches.  

    Share this with all of your teaching colleagues -- "experienced" and "new" to the profession... 

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 2, 4:01 PM

    Getting social with learning, powering up by getting diggity digital with it.   Why not release the power by empowering in the 2014 learning places?   ~  Deb

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Efficiency in Learning, Clarified with 5 Critiques: What is Flipped Learning?

    Efficiency in Learning, Clarified with 5 Critiques: What is Flipped Learning? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it


    ...the Flipped Learning method has created quite a stir.  Here's are some responses to criticisms, using twitter as a source.


    _______________

       

    The instructor does not prepare to teach material that the class already understands.

       

    _______________

     


    Dr. Eric Mazur of Harvard University has been researching this type of learning since the early ’90s, and other educators have been applying pieces of the Flipped Learning method for even longer.

    [First, it's important to start with a common] definition of what Flipped Learning is [via] Dr. Mazur’s work including:

    • Students prepare for class by watching video, listening to podcasts, reading articles, or contemplating questions that access their prior knowledge.


    • ...students then are asked to reflect upon what they have learned and organize questions and areas of confusion.


    • Students then log in to a Facebook-like social tool, where they post their questions. 


    • The instructor sorts through these questions ...organizes them, and develops class material and scenarios that address the various areas of confusion. The instructor does not prepare to teach material that the class already understands.
       
    • The instructor uses a Socratic method of teaching, where questions and problems are posed and students work together to answer the questions or solve the problems. The role of the instructor is to listen to conversations and engage with individuals and groups as needed.


    _______________

         

    [Techniques include]....how to quiz ...and provide them with immediate feedback...within the same video ...[and] …combines video clips with [how to use]  Google Forms to gather feedback...as part of a cycle of inquiry.

       

    _______________


    Excerpts from the  5 critiques include:


    Implementing the Flipped Learning method makes me, as the teacher, much less important. 

    This could not be further from the truth! …teachers are more important than ever.
     

    Kids do not want to sit at home watching boring video lectures on the Web. …This is just a lot of excitement over bad pedagogy.    We completely agree… …Audio and video should be used in short, five- to 10-minute segments, [with] opportunities for students to interact with the information in these videos in a variety of ways. …For example…Jac De Haan demonstrates …how to quiz students [with YouTube videos] and provide them with immediate feedback and explanation within the same video. Ramsey Musallam …combines video clips with Google Forms to gather feedback from his students. Both of these methods can be used as part of a cycle of inquiry.
     

    Other critiques with replies include:

    3) No internet access, 4) accountability questions and 5) having the time and expertise to produce the needed videos to teach in this newer way.


    Read more here.


    Photo source:  Vanguard Visions


    Related tools & posts by Deb:

          

    • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

                        

                

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Clarity is often a missing element in adapting and innovating.  This useful piece provides both clarity and examples of innovations to deal with status quo resistance to adaptive change in learning.  ~  D

    more...
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2:27 PM

    This post covers both a clarification of what Flipped Learning really is, as well as how to respond to common complaints about helping it work.  It demonstrates response to resistance to change in learning quite nicely, including innovative examples of what works.

    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Adapting Executive Learning: How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence'

    Adapting Executive Learning:  How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence' | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

    A new perspective on change including: Creating Infectious Action, great experiential learning to inspire change, and Stanford's d.school.


    ______________

    Scaling Up Excellence
     ....never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.

    ______________


    Stanford Biz School Professor Huggy Rao and I spent seven years working on Scaling Up Excellenceto be published in early February. The d.school and the book are deeply intertwined – it never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.


    In 2006 we moved into our first dedicated teaching space – a double-wide trailer on the Stanford campus. A big and often unruly gang of us taught a class that is now called Bootcamp for the first time that January.


    ...Over 20 people were on the teaching team for 60 students).  ...I was talking a lot (often over a glass of wine) with Stanford Business School colleague Huggy Rao — who had just arrived at Stanford...about the madness of the d.school, how our goal was to create great experiential learning.

        

    • Huggy, a design thinker at heart, immediately asked the “and” question “suppose we did an executive program that combined traditional classroom education in the mornings AND that hands on stuff you do at the d.school in the afternoons.”
      

    Huggy convinced Stanford to take a risk on our crazy new program. ...We launched Customer-Focused Innovation in 2006...    30 or so executives gathered in a case style classroom at the Business School to discuss topics like leading innovation, strategy, marketing, and such.


    Read more on this story here.


    Related posts & tools by Deb:


          

                

             


     

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This is a new millenium case study on how new models of learning develop in higher education, amidst hide-bound academe, inspiring executives who may bring in with them old patterns, yet are open to new modes of learning.


    There is hopefulness for our own capacity for change in reading this adaptive learning story.  ~  Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Learning Design Perspectives: SAM and ADDIE

    Learning Design Perspectives:  SAM and ADDIE | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

    The author pointed says that no model (old or new) will prevent ‘boring, lifeless training.’   Can the [classic] ADDIE model be enhanced?  Absolutely. 

    Excerpts:

    The essential differences in these models, including what’s captured in Allen’s SAM process, is to make the model less linear and to include feedback loops within the process for regular look backs, particularly to the data from the analysis phase. 


    The problem with these models, including SAM, is that they seem to require redundancy.  There are certainly instances when such redundancy is not necessary. 


    ... the ADDIE model was [not] designed to be a strictly linear process anyway...

    [The author]  ...prefers this cyclic visualization of ADDIE to better show the interactions between the phases.


    From the comments:  " Is SAM similar to Agile and ADDIE similar to Waterfall, as in software development?   

        

    Related posts by Deb:
        

    Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

         

    Agile Leader Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through Sharp Rocks

         

    Co-Creation in Theory U: Leading from the Future as it Emerges & the Road to Commitment


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This thoughtful article and  comments help in getting a perspective on any model past and present.  Commenter Karen offers that “pure Agile” approaches do not work for all projects.  She mentions  “AgileFall” as a combination of approaches.  

    She also suggests that a combo of SAM and ADDIE will emerge, keeping ADDIE’s structure and proven methods while incorporating SAM’s iterative approach. ~  Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    Advice for Middle-Age Seekers of MOOCs

    Advice for Middle-Age Seekers of MOOCs | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
    Cathy N. Davidson, a researcher on learning in the digital age, addresses some of the negatives about massive open online courses, though with an eye to their potential.
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Here's a sensible and indepth (New York Times) article on using MOOCs as a GenX or Boomer, a part of agile learning 2013.  ~  Deb

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
    Scoop.it!

    10 Expectations from Students, Leaving to Learn Video

    10 Expectations from Students, Leaving to Learn Video | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

    Timing, Relationships, Relevance, Engagement and more.


    From "Leaving to Learn"


    Related posts by Deb:



       
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Well done!  These 10 student expectations are questions, EXCELLENT questions for adult as well as younger student educators and shed light on needs for business / learning innovation. ~ D

    more...
    No comment yet.