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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Connectivism
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The Attack on Higher Ed — and Why We Should Welcome It, MOOC Redux, TED Blog

The Attack on Higher Ed — and Why We Should Welcome It,  MOOC Redux, TED Blog | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

George Siemens taught the first MOOC back in 2008. He shares his take on why they're still valid -- and what might happen next in Higher Ed.


Excerpts:


As the failures and shortcomings of MOOCs were disseminated, schadenfreude mingled with personal beliefs prompted academics to lament completion rates and the failure of online learning while self-validating their own importance.


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Corporate MOOCs will be the big trend of 2014. ...MOOC providers will ...fill in the gap that existing universities do not address. 

         

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...[George Siemens is] struck by the range of errors and misunderstanding within both camps.
 

...MOOCs are here to stay, in some form or other, not least because universities face many structural challenges. 
 

…what learners really need has diversified over the past several decades as the knowledge economy has expanded. Universities have not kept pace with learner needs and MOOCs have caused a much needed stir — a period of reflection and self-assessment. To date, higher education has largely failed to learn the lessons of participatory culture, distributed and fragmented value systems and networked learning. MOOCs have forced a serious assessment of the idea of a university and how education should be related to and supportive of the society in which it exists.
 

So what happens now?
 

Corporate MOOCs will be the big trend of 2014. ...MOOC providers will partner with corporations and fill in the gap that existing universities do not address.

Related posts & tools by Deb:



          



Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Turbulence, escalating costs point the way way to disruptive new forms of learning, highlighting networked learning, open systems and giving systems that have the correct balance of process, involvement and results.  

Flexibility and adapting to change is the essential new competency of the millenium, especially for higher education. ~  Deb

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Richard Platt's curator insight, February 3, 2014 10:14 PM

Universities just got told off

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Maximizing Business Value
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Learning is the Work ~ The Future of Jobs

Learning is the Work ~ The Future of Jobs | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"...automation is replacing most routine work...[leaving] customized work, which requires initiative, creativity and passion."

Valued work, and the environments in which it takes place, is becoming more complex. Professionals today are doing work that cannot be easily standardized.


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...the optimal way to do work is to constantly probe the environment and test emergent practices...[which] are dependent on the cooperation of all workers [and]... the free flow of knowledge.

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"In complexity, we can determine the relationship between cause and effect only in retrospect. ...[This] puts into question most of our management frameworks that require detailed analysis before we take action. It also shows that identifying and copying best practices is pretty well useless.


"In complex work environments, the optimal way to do work is to constantly probe the environment and test emergent practices. This requires an engaged and empowered workforce. Emergent practices are dependent on the cooperation of all workers (and management) as well as the free flow of knowledge.

 

"Work in complex situations requires a greater percentage of implicit knowledge,...Research shows that sharing complex knowledge requires strong interpersonal relationships. But discovering innovative ideas usually comes through loose social ties. Organizations need both, and communities of practice can help to connect tight work teams with loose social networks.

    

...this new world of work needs individuals who are adept at sense-making. One framework for this is personal knowledge management."


The most effective learning in the new world of work will be when engaged individuals, working out loud, share their knowledge. Training and education will remain inputs, but minor ones. 


See the other ScoopIt featuring and earlier post from the same author:      Pushing and Pulling Tacit Knowledge


As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.
 

Related posts by Deb:
    

     

    


  

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

     


Via Jim Lerman, midmarketplace
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Harold Jarche make the point of loose -tight structure and customization, dependent on open, sharing environments.  Curation, such as these newsletters on ScoopIt, is a type of personal knowledge management.

Other posts shared in this stream offer the types of open networks and giving, learning, helping environments that can create the needed loose - tight structures for learning.    ~  D

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Laura Rosillo's curator insight, October 13, 2013 8:52 AM

Sobre el futuro del trabajo y la Gestión del Conocimiento: El aprendizaje es el trabajo de Harold Jarche: Muy recomendable su lectura

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Adapting Executive Learning: How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence'

Adapting Executive Learning:  How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence' | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

A new perspective on change including: Creating Infectious Action, great experiential learning to inspire change, and Stanford's d.school.


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Scaling Up Excellence
 ....never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.

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Stanford Biz School Professor Huggy Rao and I spent seven years working on Scaling Up Excellenceto be published in early February. The d.school and the book are deeply intertwined – it never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.


In 2006 we moved into our first dedicated teaching space – a double-wide trailer on the Stanford campus. A big and often unruly gang of us taught a class that is now called Bootcamp for the first time that January.


...Over 20 people were on the teaching team for 60 students).  ...I was talking a lot (often over a glass of wine) with Stanford Business School colleague Huggy Rao — who had just arrived at Stanford...about the madness of the d.school, how our goal was to create great experiential learning.

    

  • Huggy, a design thinker at heart, immediately asked the “and” question “suppose we did an executive program that combined traditional classroom education in the mornings AND that hands on stuff you do at the d.school in the afternoons.”
  

Huggy convinced Stanford to take a risk on our crazy new program. ...We launched Customer-Focused Innovation in 2006...    30 or so executives gathered in a case style classroom at the Business School to discuss topics like leading innovation, strategy, marketing, and such.


Read more on this story here.


Related posts & tools by Deb:


      

            

         


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a new millenium case study on how new models of learning develop in higher education, amidst hide-bound academe, inspiring executives who may bring in with them old patterns, yet are open to new modes of learning.


There is hopefulness for our own capacity for change in reading this adaptive learning story.  ~  Deb

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You

Getting Stronger through Stress: Making Black Swans Work for You | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"...our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility."



Excerpts - Edge Perspectives with John Hagel: 


...we all need to find ways to harness the power of randomness, volatility and extreme events to help us grow and develop more of our potential.


Focusing on Black Swans


Nassim Nicholas Taleb writes about black swans [including] three books: Fooled by RandomnessThe Black Swan and, now, Antifragile.


Black Swans, in Taleb’s parlance, are “large-scale unpredictable and irregular events of massive consequence.’


The latest book focuses on approaches that enable us to thrive from high levels of volatility, and particularly those unexpected extreme events.

It...willl...prove infuriating to most of our economic, educational and political elites, for he argues that these elites have played a major role in making us increasingly vulnerable to volatility and Black Swans.


...The quest for antifragility

The real opportunity, in Taleb’s view, is to learn and grow from volatility and unexpected events – not to return to where you were, but to become even better as a result of the exposure and experience.   


He makes an important point: biological systems in nature are inherently antifragile – they are constantly evolving and growing stronger as a result of random events. In contrast, man-made systems tend to be fragile, they are the ones that have a hard time coping with random events.  


Taleb highlights a key paradox: our focus in modern times on removing or minimizing randomness has actually had the perverse effect of increasing fragility.


Related posts by Deb:


   

   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Resilience, Robustness? - Nope.  The blog author references another author who uses nature to describe "Antifragility."   I see a parallel with the concept of Agile systems, including learning agility and "unlearning."  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  by Tamsin Slater, Flickr CC

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 10, 2013 2:00 PM

This post was originally Scooped in Agile Learning.  It also seems a very useful perspective for Change Management Resources with the concept "Anti-Fragile" compared to resilience and resistance.  ~  Deb


Photo credit:  By Tamsin Slater

Harry Cannon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:25 AM

Are we becoming too risk averse, in projects and society? We seem less tolerant of failure, which makes us less able to deal with the setbacks that do occur.