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Keeping it Real: 4 Points to be Flexible in Teaching, Jane Elliot's Famous Experiment

Keeping it Real:  4 Points to be Flexible in Teaching, Jane Elliot's Famous Experiment | Agile Learning | Scoop.it


How to make it clear, satisfying, concrete, and real - including Jane Elliot's Famous Experiment and the impact it still has today in the third point, #3.  It's worth a re-read every so often to remember.
 

1) Make it clear

When I was a journalist, [I used] the inverted pyramid structure....the upper part …. represents the most important facts, ….and the lower part ...represents additional information …in order of diminishing importance. The pyramid [has] three sections: the “lead”, “body”, and “tail."  ...frame your...“lead” around a problem to be solved or an enquiry to be investigated...  [C]oncentrate on writing questions...  [W]rite a “big question” which forms the basis for the lesson. 

       

2) Make it satisfying

       

…Once I’ve opened a gap in my knowledge I must fill it; once a problem has been brought to my attention, I must solve it. This explains why I watched Disaster Movie through to the bitter end. Piquing curiosity … is also key to effective teaching. ….start by highlighting the knowledge they are missing. Another technique is to start a lesson by asking students to make a prediction.

    

3)  Make it concrete   [The Experiment]

        

…ensure your ideas “stick” by making them tangible. ...Take, for example, Jane Elliott’s famous “blue-eyed/brown-eyed” experiment with third grade students the day after Martin Luther King had been assassinated in 1968. 

       

....Most of Elliott’s students were, like her, born and raised in a small town in Iowa, and were not normally exposed to Black people. ....she divided the class into the brown-eyed and the blue-eyed children. She said the blue-eyed children were the superior group, provided brown fabric collars and asked the blue-eyed students to wrap them around the necks of their brown-eyed peers as a method of easily identifying the minority group. She gave the blue-eyed children extra privileges, such as second helpings at lunch, access to the new jungle gym, and five extra minutes at recess.   

    

….eventually those who were deemed “superior” became arrogant, bossy and otherwise unpleasant to their “inferior” classmates. Their grades also improved, doing mathematical and reading tasks that had seemed outside their ability before. The “inferior” classmates also transformed into timid and subservient children who even during recess isolated themselves, including those who had previously been dominant in the class. These children’s academic performance suffered, even with tasks that had been simple before. 

     

Once she had concluded the experiment, she asked the children to reflect by writing down what they had learned and it became clear that her students had come to deeply understand racism because Elliot had made it feel real, she had grounded an abstract concept in sensory reality and thus engaged her students’ emotions.

     

(DN:  See my comment below for a link to the impact of this experiment decades later on the children who were in the original class.)
      

4) Make it real

     

...Metaphor is good at making ideas stick because it brings ideas to life, it draws connections between new knowledge and existing knowledge.  For example, if you are trying to describe how electricity flows through a material, you’ll need to explain the structure of atoms. You might first use a metaphor which describes atoms as “nature’s building blocks” to help your students understand an atom’s function.

     

As always in REVELN ScoopIt news, click on the photo to see the full post.

Related posts by Deb:

    

    

     

    

      
  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The standout here is the controversial and visceral story of Jane Elliot's controversial blue-eye, brown-eyed experiment.  A paper that described the lasting effects of this experience is here, quoting the students in the original classroom some 40+ years later.  So as for concrete (and real) we have Ray Hansen,
     
…now 43 and an attorney in Rochester, Minnesota, says that because of Jane, “I go out of my way to offer a kind word to people of color. I don’t think I would do that if not for Jane. What Jane taught is woven into the fabric of my being. You cannot underestimate the impact that such an experience has had on us.

      

I don’t know how anyone who went through the experience can say that they have not been changed. Jane must get the credit she deserves for making the world a better place, and making us better human beings.”

      
Concrete and real, indeed.  ~  Deb 

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Reverse Mentoring: The Big Benefits to Learning From Younger Employees & Colleagues

Reverse Mentoring: The Big Benefits to Learning From Younger Employees & Colleagues | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

If you are trying to move ahead of your competition, try shifting into reverse with your mentoring.


___________________

   

Their insights might even be shocking, and....could lead to powerful breakthroughs.

___________________

   

   

…the next time you hire an intern, make a concerted effort to listen to and learn from them. Yep, learning can be a two-way street even with interns. … Their insights might even be shocking, and if we can keep our egos in check, they could lead to powerful breakthroughs.
     

The music industry is on the leading edge of showing how reverse mentoring and young/old collaborations can not only work but JAM! A past Grammy Awards show was a stellar example. Robert Plant (from Led Zeppelin) and Alison Krauss lead the evening with five awards. We also saw cross-generational performances by Stevie Wonder and The Jonas Brothers, Al Green and Justin Timberlake and Sir Paul McCartney and drummer, Dave Grohl.
    
Consider these success factors to reverse mentoring as well as traditional mentoring relationships:
    
Create and maintain an attitude of openness to the experience.
Dissolve the barriers of status, power and position.
Commit the necessary time.
Have a game plan and goal.
Define rules of engagement.
Actively listen.
Be patient.


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The music industry example, and keeping our egos in check are great ones for reverse mentoring.  To that I'd add:  

Futurist, Bob Johansen discusses how we, as adults, now learn new skills from our kids, who are digital natives, defined as those under the age of 13.  He and others describe this as “reverse mentoring.”

At conferences, Johansen has shown video clips of pre-language babies finding their way around an iPad, then showing confusion and frustration when they are handed a traditional magazine.   ~  D


[i]

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A True Learning Culture: Fixing Your Social Learning Network

A True Learning Culture:  Fixing Your Social Learning Network | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Employees say they get more out of informal learning, but many social learning programs fail to engage. Here’s what you can do to change that."
 

It’s about setting expectations and enabling success.
 

Social learning  [is] informal learning. ...


These included: job shadowing, peer-to-peer learning, attending cross-departmental meetings and similar self-managed learning opportunities. When surveyed, employees felt that the informal opportunities were just as valuable, if not more, than the formal learning opportunities.

______________
   
All employees need searchable profiles, collaboration tools like...screen share and file sharing, forums for sharing knowledge and ideally, some level of integration between all of these.   
______________
 


Included: 


2. Empower employees to share: Employees are the No. 1 source of knowledge...at any organization. Sett clear expectation that employees should share their knowledge with each other is the first step toward building peer-to-peer learning networks. ...Encourage employees to set up their own training sessions....peer-to-peer or large groups. If employees need to go through human resources or the training department, this can only hold up the process and momentum.
    

3. Provide the tools: All employees need searchable profiles, collaboration tools like video chat, screen share and file sharing, forums for sharing knowledge and ideally, some level of integration between all of these.  [So] many sophisticated organizations still lack some of the most basic collaboration tools.
       

4. Recognize the effort: Recognize, and even reward, those who participate and contribute. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

          

      

     

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

                   

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

There is still hesitancy in fully embracing informal peer to peer learning in organizations.  The phrase in this piece, "Recognize, and even reward... those who participate" gives a hint of this.  


Letting go of the traditional control mechanisms to reconfigure informal learning, and tie it to learning goals and skills areas, like creativity, innovation and cross boundary sharing could be another start to agile learning.   ~  D

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The Military Case For Sharing Knowledge

The Military Case For Sharing Knowledge | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

When General Stanley McChrystal started fighting al Qaeda in 2003, information and secrets were the lifeblood of his operations. But as the unconventional battle waged on, he began to think that the culture of keeping important information classified was misguided and actually counterproductive. In a short but powerful talk McChrystal makes the case for actively sharing knowledge.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

          

    
    
  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This piece features an interactive transcript of a talk with this four-star general credited for creating a revolution in warfare that fuses intelligence and operations. ~ D

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 21, 2014 10:47 AM

This is a strong case for personal knowledge mastery.


Powerful reflections from General McChrystal: 


"What we found is we had to change. We had to change our culture about information. We had to knock down walls. We had to share. We had to change from who needs to know to the fact that who doesn't know, and we need to tell, and tell them as quickly as we can. It was a significant culture shift for an organization that had secrecy in its DNA."


"What we did was we changed the idea of information, instead of knowledge is power, to one where sharing is power. It was the fundamental shift, not new tactics, not new weapons, not new anything else."

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The State of Digital Education.

The State of Digital Education. | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

The State of Digital Education Infographic #elearning #edtech #edtechchat

Related tools & posts by Deb:


  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.
        

            

    

                   

Via ICTPHMS, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Suvi Salo, Ivon Prefontaine, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

What is happening with Digital Learning, 2014?   This infographic provides perspective and key phrase that speaks volumes, "Education's Internet Moment is Now."  ~  Deb

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 14, 2014 7:48 PM

The challenge we face is that School is an outdated technology itself. We need substantial structural change.

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Why Leadership Development Programs Fail - McKinsey & Co

Why Leadership Development Programs Fail - McKinsey & Co | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Sidestepping four common mistakes can help companies develop stronger and more capable leaders.


1. Overlooking context   A brilliant leader in one situation does not necessarily perform well in another. ....Too many training initiatives we come across rest on the assumption that one size fits all and that the same group of skills or style of leadership is appropriate regardless of strategy, organizational culture, or CEO mandate.

...Focusing on context inevitably means equipping leaders with a small number of competencies (two to three) that will make a significant difference to performance.   (Bold mine, DN)


2. Decoupling reflection from real work   ...On the one hand, there is value in off-site programs ...offering ...Ftime to step back.... On the other hand...adults typically retain just 10 percent of what they hear in classroom lectures, versus nearly two-thirds when they learn by doing. 

...one large international engineering and construction player built a multiyear leadership program that not only accelerated the personal-development paths of 300 midlevel leaders but also ensured that projects were delivered on time and on budget. Each participant chose a separate project... linked to specified changes in individual behavior...

3. Underestimating mind-sets  ...too often these organizations are reluctant to address the root causes of why leaders act the way they do. 

 

4. Failing to measure results      ....One approach is to assess the extent of behavioral change, perhaps through a 360 degree–feedback exercise at the beginning of a program and followed by another one after 6 to 12 months.   .... monitor the business impact, especially when training is tied to breakthrough projects. 

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  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.
        

        


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

McKinsey has featured some excellent stories and principles to take leader learning beyond the classroom with focused & clear strategies. ~ D

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 2, 2014 12:57 AM

Context is important. This has been known for some time so it is not something new. The challenge is how do we change what goes on?

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Change Management featured at the KM Solutions Showcase™ in Arlington, VA - March 27, 2014

Change Management featured at the KM Solutions Showcase™ in Arlington, VA - March 27, 2014 | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
From the KM Institute…
   
A reminder about the upcoming KM Solutions Showcase™ Conference & Expo, March 27, at the Westin Arlington
   
The Showcase is a fun, one-day conference covering the hottest topics in Knowledge Management: Change Management, Culture Change, KM Methods; Knowledge Capture & Retention, Taxonomy/Search, and more.
    
It's FREE for all Government and Military, and low-cost for Industry.  Located at the beautiful Westin Arlington, just two blocks from the Ballston Metro Stop.  
    
Includes gourmet boxed lunch, prizes, vendor exhibits, materials and Happy Hour.
   
The Agenda is set, our acclaimed Speakers are booked… and we hope you can join us!  
   
Register soon!  Also feel free to forward to friends/colleagues who may be interested.  Groups are welcome!

The change management track includes me:

Deb Nystrom
President of Reveln Consulting, Deb's expertise and service offering is three-fold: 1) Aligning Data, People, and Passion,
2) Solutions in Change Facilitation and Leadership, and

3) Social Media, to empower Change Leaders, consultants, and coaches, using her popular "Social Media Learning Lab" (SMLL).


Deb will discuss how to FRAME an approach to adaptive, people-centered change and knowledge management.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'll be presenting at this KM conference in the change management track.   My LinkedIn profile info is here.  Feel free to look at my background or connect with me before the conference.  

Come join us for a good day of learning and exchange in Arlington, Virginia, near D.C.   My other speaking events are:

Recent speaking events are here. ~  Deb 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:05 AM

I'll be presenting at this KM conference in the change management track.   My LinkedIn profile info is here.  Feel free to look at my background or connect with me before the conference.  

Come join us for a good day of learning and exchange in Arlington, Virginia, near D.C.   My other speaking events are:

Recent speaking events are here. ~  Deb 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:28 AM

There's still time to attend this one day Knowledge Management conference in lovely Arlington, Virginia.  I'll be presenting in the Change Management track.  My LinkedIn profile info is here.  Feel free to look at my background or connect with me before the conference.  ~  Deb

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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on People , then Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on People , then Results | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  


It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a 
wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.


....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:


See the companion post about Holacracy, here.


As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:
 

     

    

    

     

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams, delivered once a month via email.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

         

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I just featured the called out quote above about complexity (over complicated, bureaucratic), and less hierarchy, more communication via networks in my most recent post about letting go of industrial age thinking via the command and control nature of performance appraisals.  

Wirearchy and holacracy (think Zappos) are alternatives that embrace networked learning.  One is arguably a set of principles, the latter is an organization design approach that deemphasizes management.

~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2014 2:50 PM

Holacracies, wirearchies and feedback rich cultures are one of the key ways organizations can adapt to disruptive change, or so it is beginning to look.   It will take solid leadership to change the nature of control and power in new millenium organizations, with unconventional larger organizations. like Zappos, leading the way.  ~  D

Helen Teague's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:46 PM

well worth the reading time.

InflatableCostumes's curator insight, March 7, 2014 7:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

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The Attack on Higher Ed — and Why We Should Welcome It, MOOC Redux, TED Blog

The Attack on Higher Ed — and Why We Should Welcome It,  MOOC Redux, TED Blog | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

George Siemens taught the first MOOC back in 2008. He shares his take on why they're still valid -- and what might happen next in Higher Ed.


Excerpts:


As the failures and shortcomings of MOOCs were disseminated, schadenfreude mingled with personal beliefs prompted academics to lament completion rates and the failure of online learning while self-validating their own importance.


_________________________
     
Corporate MOOCs will be the big trend of 2014. ...MOOC providers will ...fill in the gap that existing universities do not address. 

         

_________________________

 

...[George Siemens is] struck by the range of errors and misunderstanding within both camps.
 

...MOOCs are here to stay, in some form or other, not least because universities face many structural challenges. 
 

…what learners really need has diversified over the past several decades as the knowledge economy has expanded. Universities have not kept pace with learner needs and MOOCs have caused a much needed stir — a period of reflection and self-assessment. To date, higher education has largely failed to learn the lessons of participatory culture, distributed and fragmented value systems and networked learning. MOOCs have forced a serious assessment of the idea of a university and how education should be related to and supportive of the society in which it exists.
 

So what happens now?
 

Corporate MOOCs will be the big trend of 2014. ...MOOC providers will partner with corporations and fill in the gap that existing universities do not address.

Related posts & tools by Deb:



          



Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Turbulence, escalating costs point the way way to disruptive new forms of learning, highlighting networked learning, open systems and giving systems that have the correct balance of process, involvement and results.  

Flexibility and adapting to change is the essential new competency of the millenium, especially for higher education. ~  Deb

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Richard Platt's curator insight, February 3, 2014 10:14 PM

Universities just got told off

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Adapting Executive Learning: How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence'

Adapting Executive Learning:  How the Stanford D.School Inspired 'Scaling Up Excellence' | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

A new perspective on change including: Creating Infectious Action, great experiential learning to inspire change, and Stanford's d.school.


______________

Scaling Up Excellence
 ....never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.

______________


Stanford Biz School Professor Huggy Rao and I spent seven years working on Scaling Up Excellenceto be published in early February. The d.school and the book are deeply intertwined – it never would have been written without the healthy discomfort the d.school creates for both students and teachers.


In 2006 we moved into our first dedicated teaching space – a double-wide trailer on the Stanford campus. A big and often unruly gang of us taught a class that is now called Bootcamp for the first time that January.


...Over 20 people were on the teaching team for 60 students).  ...I was talking a lot (often over a glass of wine) with Stanford Business School colleague Huggy Rao — who had just arrived at Stanford...about the madness of the d.school, how our goal was to create great experiential learning.

    

  • Huggy, a design thinker at heart, immediately asked the “and” question “suppose we did an executive program that combined traditional classroom education in the mornings AND that hands on stuff you do at the d.school in the afternoons.”
  

Huggy convinced Stanford to take a risk on our crazy new program. ...We launched Customer-Focused Innovation in 2006...    30 or so executives gathered in a case style classroom at the Business School to discuss topics like leading innovation, strategy, marketing, and such.


Read more on this story here.


Related posts & tools by Deb:


      

            

         


 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a new millenium case study on how new models of learning develop in higher education, amidst hide-bound academe, inspiring executives who may bring in with them old patterns, yet are open to new modes of learning.


There is hopefulness for our own capacity for change in reading this adaptive learning story.  ~  Deb

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The Lean Launch Pad at Stanford – “AARRR,” Customer Relationships

The Lean Launch Pad at Stanford – “AARRR,” Customer Relationships | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

The Stanford Lean LaunchPad class was an experiment in a new model of teaching startup entrepreneurship.

This is a sample of part five.  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Links are included in this sample, 5th in the series, useful to inform anyone interested in the entrepreneurial side of what they do.  ~  D

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5 Brain Myths That Won't Go Away, Getting the Facts Right in 2014

5 Brain Myths That Won't Go Away, Getting the Facts Right in 2014 | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Scientists are not only far from a comprehensive explanation of how the brain works, they can't even agree on the best way to study it. So it's not surprising that myths and misinformation continue to persist.  Why do we continue to buy into these falsehoods?"
 

Myth: You are either right- or left-brained dominant.

    

"In reality, we are all whole-brain users." said Shelton. "But this myth helps people define their differences, similar to calling someone male or female. So if you define yourself as right-brained, it immediately connects you with a set of predetermined qualities."

     

Other debunked myths in this useful piece:

   

Myth: You only use 10 percent of your brain.

Myth: Alcohol kills brain cells.

Myth: Brain damage is permanent.

Myth: Your IQ is a fixed number.

      

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

              

      

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

Via Dana Hoffman
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Brain sapping beliefs persist and drain productivity and performance in business and in overall learning.  Check the job descriptions in your organization for words like "must be able to multi-task" and must "manage multiple projects simultaneously." 


Check manufacturing employee schedules for overloaded work-days such 12 hour days 7 days a week.  It's happening in businesses making record profits and NOT hiring temp staff to even out the work load.


At least this good article brings us up to date on brain science.  We have a long way to go.   ~  Deb 

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Beyond the Stilted Webinar: 5 Essential Ingredients For Learning (SPLAT)

Beyond the Stilted Webinar:  5 Essential Ingredients For Learning (SPLAT) | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
I was listening to a fascinating show by Pat Flynn, blogger and podcaster who was interviewing Bryan Kelly from What The Speak on the neuroscience behind great presentations. As I thought about the...

Via Stephanie Sandifer
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

So many webinars do NOT follow this handy SPLAT acronym.  Q & A, by "raising your hand" is not the same as "talking is learning."  We have a long ways to go to enable full conversation in webinars.  The current stay is still MUCH more lecture based.  ~  Deb

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Stephanie Sandifer's curator insight, July 27, 2014 11:17 AM

I consider myself to be an "experienced" educator -- that means I've spent many years in the classroom and I'm "old."  But I've never stopped trying to learn more and to be reflective about what I am doing so that I can improve how I help students learn.  

The five ingredients listed in this blog post are fairly "spot on" in my opinion and my experience.  I would have enjoyed a post like this when I first started my teaching career.  I'm not sure if I would have fully understood all of this initially -- but it would have made it much easier to learn this in the trenches.  

Share this with all of your teaching colleagues -- "experienced" and "new" to the profession... 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 2, 2014 4:01 PM

Getting social with learning, powering up by getting diggity digital with it.   Why not release the power by empowering in the 2014 learning places?   ~  Deb

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New Report: The Internet’s Latest Disruption – Knowledge 2.0

New Report: The Internet’s Latest Disruption – Knowledge 2.0 | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Know or die: risk and opportunity of Knowledge 2.0

“And the web stormed the enterprise and disrupted roles, tasks and jobs: it cast speed, openness, flexibility and efficiency throughout, sparing no business processes: manufacturing, logistic, accounting, customer relation management, lead generation…”

The digital mutation is also profoundly disrupting how knowledge is acquired, organized and shared. Knowledge is an intangible, yet strategic asset of any enterprise. With businesses becoming more virtual and dematerialized, its value is patently and rapidly growing. 


What do we do? From cognizant to savvy via social curation

The new knowledge sharing paradigm in the enterprise is real-time information, in an open world, with pervasive expertise.
 

...The benefits of a Knowledge Sharing solution

Deploy a consistent solution that involves (most) employees and leverages expertise - this yields lots of tangible benefits:

  • It increases the performance of each individual, by means of personal education; it is the most effective way to develop the enterprise human capital

  • It increases the performance of each group within the enterprise, by means of collaboration; and also through better understanding of each other, by better synchronization of knowledge throughout the enterprise

  • It increases the global business intelligence of the enterprise, by means of better monitoring and better filtering of real-time web content

  • It increases the amount of relevant content available to the enterprise content strategy. Indeed, qualified knowledge is quality content and can be redistributed externally to demonstrate thought leadership, feed a community and an audience. And every enterprise needs lot of it.

    
  • It helps detect, develop and reward internal thought leaders

    
  • It helps nurture brand advocates

    

... it does not cost much resource, since everyone in the enterprise is already an expert who discovers, reads, analyzes, filters lots of content… it is just a matter of adding this effort to capture and share the best of it!

Sharing of third party content in the enterprise:

  • Educates employees for 96%

  • Makes organization more efficient for 87%

  • Helps convince teammates for 69%

  • Helps convince clients for 84%

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Is this knowledge management ramped up with curation tools?   Sharing with the Knowledge Management Institute to get their perspective.  ~  Deb

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Emerging Technologies News via the Horizon Report, The 2014 Higher Education Edition Video

New Media Consortium (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) recently released  the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition.  It's part of an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education.

Fast Trends: Driving changes in higher education over the next one to two years

  • Growing Ubiquity of Social Media
  • Integration of Online, Hybrid, and Collaborative Learning

Mid-Range Trends: Driving changes in higher education within three to five years
  • Rise of Data-Driven Learning and Assessment
  • Shift from Students as Consumers to Students as Creators


Long-Range Trends: Driving changes in higher education in five or more years

  • Agile Approaches to Change   There is a growing consensus....that institutional leadership and curricula could benefit from agile startup models. 

  • Evolution of Online Learning Progress in learning analytics, adaptive learning, and a combination of cutting-edge asynchronous and synchronous tools will continue to advance the state of online learning... though many of these are still the subjects of experiments and research.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Trend watching!  This is useful for any type of forecasting for higher education, with implications for anyone involved in learning and technology.  ~  D

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Think Like a Designer: Drawing Inspiration From Creative Types

Think Like a Designer: Drawing Inspiration From Creative Types | Agile Learning | Scoop.it
You don’t have to be a designer to utilize creative thinking. Learning to think outside the box can be a huge asset to your canon of skills.


Excerpts from the list:


1. Live in the moment  ... real world inspiration can’t be beat.


2. Peruse visual social media   ...Designers love the newest visual forms of social media for quick ideas, opening accounts on sites like Pinterest, Tumblr, Instagram and Paper.


5. Scribble and doodle     You might achieve higher-level thinking if you make like a grade-schooler and scribble away.


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

             

       

             

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Focus, mindfulness, visuals and the ability to play  (doodle, scribble) - can make a big difference in our creativity. ~ D

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Efficiency in Learning, Clarified with 5 Critiques: What is Flipped Learning?

Efficiency in Learning, Clarified with 5 Critiques: What is Flipped Learning? | Agile Learning | Scoop.it


...the Flipped Learning method has created quite a stir.  Here's are some responses to criticisms, using twitter as a source.


_______________

   

The instructor does not prepare to teach material that the class already understands.

   

_______________

 


Dr. Eric Mazur of Harvard University has been researching this type of learning since the early ’90s, and other educators have been applying pieces of the Flipped Learning method for even longer.

[First, it's important to start with a common] definition of what Flipped Learning is [via] Dr. Mazur’s work including:

  • Students prepare for class by watching video, listening to podcasts, reading articles, or contemplating questions that access their prior knowledge.


  • ...students then are asked to reflect upon what they have learned and organize questions and areas of confusion.


  • Students then log in to a Facebook-like social tool, where they post their questions. 


  • The instructor sorts through these questions ...organizes them, and develops class material and scenarios that address the various areas of confusion. The instructor does not prepare to teach material that the class already understands.
     
  • The instructor uses a Socratic method of teaching, where questions and problems are posed and students work together to answer the questions or solve the problems. The role of the instructor is to listen to conversations and engage with individuals and groups as needed.


_______________

     

[Techniques include]....how to quiz ...and provide them with immediate feedback...within the same video ...[and] …combines video clips with [how to use]  Google Forms to gather feedback...as part of a cycle of inquiry.

   

_______________


Excerpts from the  5 critiques include:


Implementing the Flipped Learning method makes me, as the teacher, much less important. 

This could not be further from the truth! …teachers are more important than ever.
 

Kids do not want to sit at home watching boring video lectures on the Web. …This is just a lot of excitement over bad pedagogy.    We completely agree… …Audio and video should be used in short, five- to 10-minute segments, [with] opportunities for students to interact with the information in these videos in a variety of ways. …For example…Jac De Haan demonstrates …how to quiz students [with YouTube videos] and provide them with immediate feedback and explanation within the same video. Ramsey Musallam …combines video clips with Google Forms to gather feedback from his students. Both of these methods can be used as part of a cycle of inquiry.
 

Other critiques with replies include:

3) No internet access, 4) accountability questions and 5) having the time and expertise to produce the needed videos to teach in this newer way.


Read more here.


Photo source:  Vanguard Visions


Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools.

                    

            

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Clarity is often a missing element in adapting and innovating.  This useful piece provides both clarity and examples of innovations to deal with status quo resistance to adaptive change in learning.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2014 2:27 PM

This post covers both a clarification of what Flipped Learning really is, as well as how to respond to common complaints about helping it work.  It demonstrates response to resistance to change in learning quite nicely, including innovative examples of what works.

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17 Steps To Acquiring A New Skill Faster Than You Thought Possible

17 Steps To Acquiring A New Skill Faster Than You Thought Possible | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Excited about learning a new skill?  17 strategies including approaches from a noted, rapid learning expert.


Excerpted, a curated, top level list 7 of the 17 strategies listed:



1. Deconstruct & Reverse Engineer

Break it down into little pieces and master an isolated portion. Ex: learning guitar, learn how to press down a chord pattern with your fingers first without even trying to strum the chord. Once you are able to change between a couple of chord patterns, then add the strumming.



2. Pareto Principle

20% work that will give you 80% of the results. Learning a language?  Do a quick search for “most commonly used French words” & learn these first.



5. Join a Group

You’ll learn from others [and] make progress together. 



8. F.O.C.U.S.

Follow one course until success! Simply focus on the one new skill at hand until you get it done.



10. Find a Mentor

Success leaves clues. …find an expert …to avoid…making the mistakes that they have made….the expert will fast-track your learning …have them personally walk you through what needs to be done. Reach out and send an email to them.



11. Sleep On It

Practice your new skill within 4 hours of going to sleep. Josh Kaufman is a noted rapid learning expert and tells us that any practice done within this time frame causes your brain to embed the learning more rapidly into its neural pathways. Your memory and motor-mechanics needed are ingrained at a quicker level.



12. The 20 Hour Rule

Along with that tip, Kaufman also suggests 20 as the magical number of hours to dedicate to learning the new skill. His reasoning is that everyone will hit a wall early on in the rapid learning stage and that “pre-committing” to 20 hours is a sure-fire way to push through that wall and acquire your new skill.

   

15. Ditch the Distractions  Ditch social media, and the temptation to check any email.   Before you ...practice, make sure whatever potential distractions are far from sight.

 

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  • Don't miss a thing by subscribing to Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring three gold award change-themed streams, shared once a month via email,  free here,via REVELN Tools.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's a robust list with strategies that resonate.  Consider using learning strategies that you've used in the past successfully, adding perhaps 1-2 others to ramp up your learning speed & agility.   ~  D

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Create-Learning » Results vs. Process. Achieving Goals While Improving the Work

Create-Learning » Results vs. Process. Achieving Goals While Improving the Work | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

A video is listed that examines process, vs. problems with Management by Objectives (MBOs) - it's not all about results.  LEAN is about process.   ...Have PDCA, Plan-Do-Check-Act within the leadership team.


___________________
   
Most scoreboards are focused on results.  If we don't have the results we need, what are we going to do about it?

  

___________________
    


Most scoreboards are focused on results.  If we don't have the results we need, what are we going to do about it?


It's not about, like losing weight, measuring more frequently.   What processes do we need to consider?   ...MBO meetings would sometimes includes, "I don't care how you do it, just do it (get the numbers.]"


"Results without a process is luck. Process without results is waste. How are your processes driving the goals you work to achieve?"
 

The need to have people fall in love with the process of working to achieve goals as opposed to the goal itself will allow quick change and more innovation.
 

The goal is not and should not be ignored…the challenge is that the processes being used to achieve the goal need to be evaluated to ensure you are working to achieve the goal.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This timeline shows missing elements with problematic MBOs.  it's good to see this Knowledge Management piece on putting process & results together.

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David Hain's curator insight, February 3, 2014 2:46 AM

Nice matrix on intentional success.

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Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence”

Thoughts on “Collective Intelligence” | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Fascinating nuggets from the book summary of Collective Intelligence by Pierre Lévy (click through post here to locate & enlarge the chart):

 

The premise: Humankind must acknowledge the potential of cyberspace to enable beneficial new forms of complex collective thought, collective expression, and social organization.
 

Technology makes this feasible (p. 246). The author's ideas are reminiscent of:

  • Vannevar Bush‘s collective memory
  • Marshall McLuhan‘s notion of a forthcoming “global village”
  • Douglas Engelbart‘s vision of the computer as a tool to augment human thought,
  • J. C. R. Licklider‘s plans for symbiotic human—computer networks.

   

Lévy calls for a revolution in society’s understanding of itself – the expansion of subjectivity (cf. Lévy, 2000).

   

Features:

  • Multi-modal and dynamic (p. 120)
  • Virtual worlds instruments of self-knowledge and self-definition 
  • Deterritorialized with self-organization
  • Continuous self-invention of human communities
  • Computer-aided imagination 
  • The collective can choose to foster & encourage individuality
    
From another reviewer:
 
Levy begins with the premise that the prosperity of any nation or other entity depends on their ability to navigate the knowledge space, and ... knowledge space will displace the spaces of the (natural) earth, (political) territory, or (economic) commodity. 

Via Pierre Levy, Frederic DOMON
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

One word: Fascinating! (nod to Mr. Spock)


The language of the post & the book itself is academic, yet the ideas are wonder producing.  I think we are seeing the first signs of what Lévy describes in social media, gaming and in group processes like Open Space Technology, among other things.  ~  D

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, January 14, 2014 4:50 AM

Great one.

Miguel Angel Perez Alvarez's curator insight, January 14, 2014 2:14 PM

Inteligencia colectiva, evolución

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 31, 2014 11:18 PM

Cyberspace big thoughts, and perhaps indicating a fusion or an evolution of knowledge management in a group space.