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How learning and education is changing to meet our needs today and tomorrow.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Curation Tech-Hustler: Guillaume Decugis, CEO & Co-Founder of Scoop.it

Curation Tech-Hustler:  Guillaume Decugis, CEO & Co-Founder of Scoop.it | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Guillaume Decugis has some tech cred to his name.  For example:

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  • his previous company, Musiwave, became the leading Mobile Music Service Provider in Europe and was sold for $120 million in 2006 to Microsoft.
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  • he also launched Goojet, a mobile social media app which topped 1 million downloads in France at the end of 2010.
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Now, he is the CEO & Co-Founder of Scoop.it, the publishing-by-curation platform that makes it easy to create an online magazine on your favorite topic. You are reading it, via my Social-Peer Learning, Curation curated digital magazine right now.  


This post has a Vimeo interview with him, and, I quote, "Listen to his true tech hustler story now."  Heh, it's a great entry for 2012, a year for tech mobile, curation, cloud & results.   


Thanks for finding my curation news on the Reveln brand of ScoopIt.  Happy New Year!  Warmly,  Deb

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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A Whopping 47% is Peer Group: 7 compelling arguments for Peer Learning

A Whopping 47% is Peer Group:  7 compelling arguments for Peer Learning | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Peer learning is on the rise!

 

1. Powerful theoretical underpinning
Ref:  Judith Harris’s wonderful The Nurture Assumption, for which she received the George Miller Medal in psychology. 

 

In a deep look at the data she found something surprising: that 50% was genetic, just a few per cent parents and a whopping 47% peer group.

 

More:
2. Massively scalable
Peer learning may actually be better with large classes


3. Learning by teaching is probably the most powerful way to learn
Peer learning involves high-order, deep-processing activity.  The teacher may actually gain more than the learner.


4. Encourages critical thinking

5. Group bonding a side effect

6. Dramatic drops in drop-out rates

7. Higher attainment

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Support, enhance informal learning, rather than managing it. ~ Stephen's Web

Support, enhance informal learning, rather than managing it. ~ Stephen's Web | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

"Informal learning is not something L&D can design into the formal training mix, in order to try and “manage” everything everybody learns in the organisation (an impossible task!)

 

...Rather is something that needs to be supported and enhanced as it occurs naturally in the workflow – in order to help people learn to do their jobs (better)."

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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P2PU - A lab for open social learning, beyond the Harvard circle, Author: Philipp Schmidt

P2PU - A lab for open social learning, beyond the Harvard circle, Author: Philipp Schmidt | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

I'm intrigued!  This could be the non-exclusive people's community version of Harvard's innovation community.

 

Excerpt:  How P2PU could become a social learning lab - for massive experimentation?  (Question from the blog author, Phillip Schmidt, to the HASTAC community.)

 

Besides giving an elite university a lot of cash, how can we foster more innovation in learning and teaching in ways that will affect more people?

 

How could we make this a lab that you would want to use?

 

P2PU started as a place that encouraged serendipitous experiences. ...We offer a more robust (release version) of the platform for those who care less about experimentation and just want an easy to use platform for social learning.

 

Original post -> http://sharing-nicely.net/2011/10/open-learning-lab/

 

There isn’t really an open lab for learning innovation – and that P2PU could be it.

 

>if we could model ourselves as a research institute. There would be heaps of experimentation and research, some of it driven by us and some driven by partners who want to work with us, and each year we would publish a string of short reports about what we are learning.

 

> we could connect it to an annual conference with great speakers from the P2PU community who share the results of their work, and suggested that corporations would be willing to pay substantive amounts of money for this knowledge.

 

Which brings me to the term “lab”. It’s a term that means different things to different people. And when I explained that it was a mechanism to support experimentation and research, they would ask if it was “kind of like a lab.” And that’s exactly what it would it be like.

 

Supported by a platform that is extendable, hackable, malleable and customizable – We need a sandbox.  But the sandbox is not the important piece here, it’s a means to an end (or a journey rather).

 

P2PU would be run by a community that is passionate about peer learning and openness, and thrives on experimentation.

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Brand & Content Curation
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5 ways to curate and add value - Liz Guthridge

5 ways to curate and add value - Liz Guthridge | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Liz Guthridge has great information, especially on communication, change and social media.  I have a current video by her on our ChangeResults YouTube channel here:

http://www.youtube.com/user/ChangeResults?blend=7&ob=5#p/u/7/MoPG8nkRC-4

 

Here's some useful strategies from Liz on five effective ways to curate:


1. Call out the important

2. Connect the dots
3. Provide context
4. Summarize key points
5. Encourage conversations


Via The New Company
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Reading, Writing, Empathy: The Rise of 'Social Emotional Learning'

Reading, Writing, Empathy: The Rise of 'Social Emotional Learning' | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Marc Brackett never liked school. “I was always bored,” he says, “and I never felt like any of my teachers really cared. I can’t think of anybody that made me feel inspired.”

 

It’s a surprising complaint coming from a 42-year-old Yale research scientist with a 27-page CV and nearly $4 million in career funding. But Brackett knows that many kids feel the way he does about school, and he wants to do a complete emotional makeover of the nation’s schools.

 

At a time of contentious debate over how to reform schools to make teachers more effective and students more successful, “social emotional learning” may be a key part of the solution.

 

An outgrowth of the emotional intelligence framework, popularized by Daniel Goleman, SEL teaches children how to identify and manage emotions and interactions.

 

One of the central considerations of an evolved EQ—as proponents call an “emotional quotient”—is promoting empathy, a critical and often neglected quality in our increasingly interconnected, multicultural world.

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Learning to Let Go: My Friday Non-interference Pact with my Students | Blogging Pedagogy

Learning to Let Go: My Friday Non-interference Pact with my Students | Blogging Pedagogy | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Beginning ...with the second half of the semester, every Friday is given over to my students. We don’t have any readings assigned by me, and I don’t plan any material for the class.


Instead, small groups of 3-5 students are responsible for determining the day’s content and executing that.  

 

"You need to plan some sort of activity that will last at least 30 minutes; it must engage the whole class; and it must relate in an immediate way to the text we are currently reading."


Otherwise, you are free to plan what you want, and I won’t interfere.


...After the anxiety wears off, my students often seem to engage with the activity remarkably well.


It encourages ownership of the material, it provokes them to think in depth about a week’s worth of reading, and the discussion that have come out of it (so far) have turned out to be really e


It’s hard to give up directing the conversation, steering students —but of course, I still do that Mondays and Wednesdays.


What I discovered is that this group of students, ...comes around to the right questions and interpretive moments, anyways.


Today one of the group members asked about tree symbolism in Beloved. “Perhaps it’s coincidental,” one student said.


“Well,” another student answered, “it’s hard to imagine that it would be coincidental—think of all the planning that went into the novel.” And from there they were off, debating the symbolism and even debating the value of reading for symbolism...

 

Though their arguments often lacked an advanced theoretical vocabulary, my students were really thinking at high levels with great rigor.


The pedagogical point of all this, ...there is a real value in letting go of control of the classroom for a while. Let your students make mistakes, and see if they can sort them out on their own.


Let your students talk about what they’re invested in, what they find compelling about the topic at hand, what they don’t care about, and why.


Let go of being a classroom “parent” and let your students take responsibility for themselves.

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Peer-driven learning: Cracking that Nut

Peer-driven learning: Cracking that Nut | Agile Learning | Scoop.it

Can we create a process and context that supports a number of people coming together around a shared topic and more equally and effectively organising and learning about it together?

 

...Can we make it as peer-2-peer as possible, so it is more resilient, quicker to respond and far less hierarchical?

 

...some of the biggest and most interesting challenges ...lie in developing recommended social processes that groups of learners can collectively follow to develop, define and complete a course of study together.

 

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts ...many of the spaces we can look to for this are approaches such as Open Space and Unconferences.

 

From Deb:  Unconference & Open Space reference:  

http://www.unconference.net/welcome-to-the-unconference-blog/

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