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RAD: Agile 20 years before Agile

RAD: Agile 20 years before Agile | agile-development | Scoop.it

Rapid Application Development (RAD) is a term originally used to describe a software development process first developed and successfully deployed during the mid 1970s.

 

Enjoy reading its principle. Compare them with Agile's ones.

 

Then think again about the myth: "Agile revolutionized a world dominated by Waterfall".

 

Has been Agile really that revolutionary?

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My 10 things for making your Agile adoption successful

My 10 things for making your Agile adoption successful | agile-development | Scoop.it
There isn’t anything magical about 10 items it could have been 7 or 12, all three numbers have a resonance but as I put the items together it seemed that these 10 were more significant than anything else I could think of, and taking anyone away made the list less effective. So, with apologies for another top-10 list, here you are.
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The Perennial Waterfall Strawman/Myth

The Perennial Waterfall Strawman/Myth | agile-development | Scoop.it

Just as the ‘abominable snowman’ never existed, and is merely used to frighten children from playing in the snow too long, “Waterfall” is just as nonexistent and is used by coaches as propaganda scare tactics to frighten developers into buying into Agile, Lean, kanban, or whatever the flavor of the month is in project management.

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Why I’m done with Scrum | Jimmy Bogard's Blog

So I’ve had a lot of success with Scrum – but I’ve had greater success in ditching it. Here’s a few (of my many) my reasons why
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Two ways to be skeptical about Agile

Two ways to be skeptical about Agile | agile-development | Scoop.it
Is Agile too much process, or too little?
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The Trojan Form of Change

The Trojan Form of Change | agile-development | Scoop.it
It happened again. Some people at the (wildy awesome) ALE 2012 unconference said, “We need to get more managers/leaders/aliens to this event!” Really, you can dream all you want. But you will not get people with different mental models to...
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Frameworks drive language adoption

Frameworks drive language adoption | agile-development | Scoop.it

The key to creating software quickly is to re-use good existing code. Existing languages remain popular in large part because they build up a large collection of re-usable libraries, and a system for conveniently installing and using them. However, libraries alone are not enough any more.

 

An even greater productivity boost are collections of libraries that work extremely well together: frameworks. A framework takes care of as much code common to the problem domain as possible and provides developers with re-usable patterns to develop their custom software. Popular languages build up frameworks also.

 

But new languages can compete at the framework level, in part because the cost of switching frameworks can be very high. Switching to a new language is now a piece of the equation that also includes the benefits of the new framework.

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Seven Things I Hate About Agile

Seven Things I Hate About Agile | agile-development | Scoop.it

Agile has the smell of death on it. If you go to an “agile” event you will see few people under the age of 40 and many over 50. These attendees are on average much older than the average age of programmers, and often older than the people running today’s hot software companies. Why aren’t more younger people grasping at agile straws?

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Rigorous Agile

I often run into a complaint that agile methods don't have a rigorous definition. The complainer may talk about how this means that you can't tell if a particular team is using an agile method or not. They may also say that this makes it hard to teach people how to do agile methods - what's the curriculum?

 

To some degree I do feel the pain of this complaint - but I accept there is no cure. This lack of rigorousness is part of the defining nature of agile methods, part of its core philosophy.

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End the holy war over agile development

Depending on whether you're a proponent or a detractor, agile is either a family of methodologies or a religion composed of one true denomination and a handful of variously misguided sects whose only virtue is being less misguided than the waterfall contingent. The same may be said for waterfall, only backward.

 

In fact, for all the religious fervor, the question of which methodology is superior can only be answered by the phrase business managers like least from consultants: "It depends."

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6 Signs That Your Organization Is Not Ready for Agile

6 Signs That Your Organization Is Not Ready for Agile | agile-development | Scoop.it

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could make an educated guess about the Agile potential of an organization without doing a full scale assessment?

 

Let’s look at signs that any observer can notice when spending a few hours in the workplace.

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RAD: Agile 20 years before Agile

RAD: Agile 20 years before Agile | agile-development | Scoop.it

Rapid Application Development (RAD) is a term originally used to describe a software development process first developed and successfully deployed during the mid 1970s.

 

Enjoy reading its principle. Compare them with Agile's ones.

 

Then think again about the myth: "Agile revolutionized a world dominated by Waterfall".

 

Has been Agile really that revolutionary?

more...
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Product Owner & the Team

Is the product owner a member of the team? Yes. Fully and completely.

 

What is the biggest problem that most teams face? That, at the high level (value) or the low level (details), they don't understand what the customer wants well enough.

 

And who is mainly responsible for managing the flow of this 'business information' into the Team? The PO of course.

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Show How, Don't Tell What - A Management Style

Imagine 100% of your "workforce" understanding every part of the product delivery cycle and being able to make critical path decisions on the spot.

Imagine what would happen if 100% of your "workforce" were "decision makers".
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Retrospectives – Wronger and Righter

Retrospectives – Wronger and Righter | agile-development | Scoop.it

I have yet to see a development team get any real value out of a retrospective. Not that it seems impossible, just that it seems few to none understand how.


In my opinion, the relative failure of retrospectives goes a long way towards explaining the superficial nature of so-called continuous improvement in most agile development shops.

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Three Things Everyone Can Pickup from Scrum

Three Things Everyone Can Pickup from Scrum | agile-development | Scoop.it

To use Scrum, you arguably need to apply it wholly. However, some practices are not unique to Scrum: practices all teams can benefit from.

 

So, here is my list of three things I believe all teams can apply successfully.

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Is Your Scrum Master a Servant Leader? | Centare

AM's insight:

What is a Servant Leader?

 

This term was coined by Robert K. Greenleaf and published in his essay The Servant as Leader in 1970.

 

The essay was based on the bookJourney to the East by Hermann Hesse. The short story is around the main character, Leo, who is a servant to a group of travelers on a mythical journey. He takes care of the group and all their needs. One day Leo disappears, the group scrambles, falls apart and cannot continue, and abandons their journey. Leo was being a good servant and, in turn, a great leader for the group.

 

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Lean/Kanban approach to Teams

Lean/Kanban approach to Teams | agile-development | Scoop.it

If you look at the definition of Kanban or Lean, you wouldn't find teams anywhere there.

 

So, if you are a manager of an organization on the Kanban train of evolutionary improvement, what does it mean for team structure? Should you keep the current structure? Adopt the Scrum Feature Teams concept? Do something else altogether? How should you organize your people to be as effective as possible in delivering value for the stakeholders?

 

Are Teams an emerging property?

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Kaizen and Kaikaku Regardless of Scrum and Kanban » Agile Trail

Kaizen and Kaikaku Regardless of Scrum and Kanban » Agile Trail | agile-development | Scoop.it

Every now and then I hear the following being said when one compares Kanban and Scrum: Kanban is Kaizen, with continuous improvement and soft and smooth changes, and whereas Scrum is Kaikaku, with disruptiv improvement and hard and rough changes.

 

I disagree, and I’d like to explain why.

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A manifesto for Agile strategy: oxymoron or innovation? | Made by Many

A manifesto for Agile strategy: oxymoron or innovation? | Made by Many | agile-development | Scoop.it
The Agile software manifesto grew from discontent with heavyweight and unwieldy methodologies that had helped so many (perhaps most) software projects run way over time and over budget. So the real question to address (even before exploring whether Agile + Strategy can co-exist) is whether there is a need for an alternative, lighter-weight approach to digital strategy and planning.

 

My short answer to this, is most definitely.

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Agile UX vs Lean UX - How they're different and why it matters for UX designers - AndersRamsay.com

Agile UX vs Lean UX - How they're different and why it matters for UX designers - AndersRamsay.com | agile-development | Scoop.it

What's the different between UX, Lean and Agile?

 

A clear, concise and effective post about it.

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Agile is Wrong for UX

Agile is Wrong for UX | agile-development | Scoop.it

When something is wrong, it deviates from truth or fact.

 

And I can say, with more confidence than ever, that traditional Agile software development methodologies (i.e. Scrum) are wrong for UX.

 

In order to prove my case, I want to take you back to the inception of Agile (as I have read and experienced it) and its related software development methodologies.

 

Along the way, we’ll point out the reasons these methodologies are incompatible with the field of User Experience Design.

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The Top 10 (Or So) Things I Wish Everyone Knew about Agile

The Top 10 (Or So) Things I Wish Everyone Knew about Agile | agile-development | Scoop.it

Students in my Kanban training classes ask great questions.

 

Many of these questions come up so often that I have started a list of my "Top 10 (or so) things I wish people knew about Lean-Kanban."

Here is my list and I'd like to know what you think should be added. I will be filling in more information about these over the next few weeks, so keep checking in with me.

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You won’t believe how old TDD is

You won’t believe how old TDD is | agile-development | Scoop.it

Kent Beck is credited as the the TDD inventor.
Yet, he claims he just re-discovered it.

 

Here’s a game: try to guess when these 2 sentences have been written. You won't believe when TDD was really invented.

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Agile Conspiracies

Agile Conspiracies | agile-development | Scoop.it

Conspiracies can be fun. Based on just enough superficial evidence or correlation, they allow us to indulge our imaginations and let off some steam. But what happens if we stumble onto a hush-hush cover-up that we were never supposed to find? Is your system just slow today, or is there a key logger running? You better conceal that camera on your monitor (hey, it’s not being paranoid when everyone is out to get you!) We are about to explore some agile conspiracies, so get your cover-up ready...

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We Tried Baseball and It Didn’t Work

We Tried Baseball and It Didn’t Work | agile-development | Scoop.it
An allegory? Sarcasm? Humorous pastiche? You decide.
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