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Pensar con las manos

Pensar con las manos | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
Aprendemos reflexionando, investigando, probando hipótesis, contrastando datos, volviendo a hacer, reflexionando de nuevo, investigando más. Aprendemos problematizando la realidad. Aprendemos haciéndonos preguntas y buscando respuestas. Aprendemos equivocándonos.

Aprendemos cuando tomamos conciencia de lo que estamos haciendo y nos organizamos para conseguir mejores resultados. Aprendemos si el contenido se nos presenta de una manera organizada, en relación con nuestras experiencias y aprendizajes previos. Si responde a nuestros intereses, necesidades o problemas. Aprendemos si estamos suficientemente motivados. Aprendemos si el aprendizaje es significativo, diría David Ausubel. O situado y atento al contexto, diría Lev Vygotsky.

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FerPEstudiante's curator insight, November 7, 2016 11:17 PM
#SCEUNED16
Gemmeta's curator insight, November 8, 2016 4:12 PM
Aprender a aprender#SCEUNED16
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The changing skill set of the learning professional

The changing skill set of the learning professional | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
Skills define us. They are what make us useful and productive. They are the foundation of our achievements. On our death bed, it is ou

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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nukem777's curator insight, February 7, 11:48 AM
Excellent!!
miracletrain 夢想驛站's curator insight, February 8, 2:04 AM
Skills define us. They are what make us useful and productive. They are the foundation of our achievements. On our death bed, it is our skills that we will reflect on with pride.
callooh's curator insight, February 11, 8:42 AM
The learning professional is at heart a generalist when it comes to skill sets (aka a jack/jill of all competencies)
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Ready to Make a Risky Decision? Your Words Suggest Otherwise

Ready to Make a Risky Decision? Your Words Suggest Otherwise | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

Uzzi, along with Bin Liu of Google and Ramesh Govindani of the University of Southern California, wanted to know if people’s electronic communications could offer clues about their emotional state. If so, this could be a powerful tool, as emotions are understood to affect the quality of our decision making. The researchers analyzed millions of instant messages (IMs) and trades from 30 traders over a two-year period. They observed that the best trading decisions, and highest profits, happened when traders showed a moderate level of emotion in their IMs—that is, not too much, and not too little. Beyond simply improving trades, this finding could help anyone tasked with making risk-related decisions, from air traffic controllers to humanitarian aid groups.


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Skills for Success in a Disruptive World of Work

Skills for Success in a Disruptive World of Work | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
“Skills young people should be learning to be prepared for a career in 2020 include:


The ability to concentrate, to focus deeply.

 

The ability to distinguish between the “noise” and the message in the ever-growing sea of information.

 

The ability to do public problem solving through cooperative work.

 

The ability to search effectively for information and to be able to discern the quality and veracity of the information one finds and then communicate these findings well.

 

Synthesizing skills (being able to bring together details from many sources).

 

The capability to be futures-minded through formal education in the practices of horizon-scanning, trends analysis and strategic foresight.”

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/what-are-the-skills-needed-from-students-in-the-future/

 


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David Baker's curator insight, December 14, 2016 2:50 PM
Infographic and discussion of the range of skills we need to help students learn as well as colleagues is helpful.  I was struggling with deep focus before I read this. It was a gentle reminder to step it up in many ways.
Gilson Schwartz's curator insight, December 18, 2016 8:30 AM
Antigamente a gente falava em "profissões do futuro". Agora são os "skills" do futuro"
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Apuntes de aprendizaje distribuido

Apuntes de aprendizaje distribuido | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

El aprendizaje distribuido es un modelo de instrucción que permite que el instructor, los estudiantes y el contenido se ubiquen en lugares diferentes, no centralizados, para que la instrucción y el aprendizaje puedan ocurrir independientemente del tiempo y el lugar.


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Connectivism – the knowledge of the connected individual

Connectivism – the knowledge of the connected individual | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
Knowledge is everywhere. In a mobile phone, a fitness tracker and our brains. Not a science fiction film but the learning theory of connectivism. Recently over a coffee

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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 13, 9:12 AM

Knowledge is everywhere. In a mobile phone, a fitness tracker and our brains. Not a science fiction film but the learning theory of connectivism.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Connectivism

 

Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, January 13, 11:58 AM
A partir de las redes sociales
Elizabeth Karvonen's curator insight, January 20, 4:44 AM
Definitely a new slant on Bloom. Important for all teachers in the digital age.
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The Science Of Gratitude And Why It’s Important In Your Workplace

The Science Of Gratitude And Why It’s Important In Your Workplace | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

This is the time of year when we focus on giving thanks, with many of us sharing our gratitude with friends and family. But when is the last time you thanked your employees? Coworkers? Or boss? If you haven’t recognized the members of your work team lately, you need to repair the oversight before your Thanksgiving Day leftovers are history.

 

Gratitude is absolutely vital in the workplace, says UC Davis psychology professor Robert Emmons, author of The Little Book of Gratitude: Creating a Life of Happiness and Wellbing by Giving Thanks, and a leading researcher on the subject. "Most of our waking hours are spent on the job, and gratitude, in all its forms, is a basic human requirement," he says. "So when you put these factors together, it is essential to both give and receive thanks at work."

 

Gratitude has been the subject of numerous studies, and the findings could be beneficial to your workplace.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 24, 2016 4:27 PM

Lack of gratitude is a major factor driving job dissatisfaction, turnover, absenteeism, and often, burnout.

Nelly Renard's curator insight, November 25, 2016 4:33 AM
Gratitude is absolutely vital in the workplace, says UC Davis psychology professor Robert Emmons, author of The Little Book of Gratitude: Creating a Life of Happiness and Wellbing by Giving Thanks, and a leading researcher on the subject. "Most of our waking hours are spent on the job, and gratitude, in all its forms, is a basic human requirement," he says. "So when you put these factors together, it is essential to both give and receive thanks at work."
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8 cosas que debes saber sobre el juego y la pedagogía

8 cosas que debes saber sobre el juego y la pedagogía | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
Además de la diversión o la motivación, la utilización las mecánicas del juego y su uso dentro del aula nos ofrecen un amplio espectro de posibilidades: desde

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digital marketing metrics

digital marketing metrics | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

Marketers have no shortage of metrics on their dashboards, but they are still often flying blind. Marketing visibility can be simultaneously clear and opaque. To paraphrase Coleridge, the state of marketing is “metrics, metrics everywhere, and not sure what to think.”


OverstateGate brought a colorful rise out of Branding Professor Mark Ritson:


“This little debacle once again confirms that nobody actually knows what the fuck is going on with digital media. Not media agencies, not big-spending clients and not armchair digital strategists. From the shadowy box of turds and spiders that is programmatic to the increasingly complex and deluded world of digital views, the idea that digital marketing is more analytical and attributable than other media is clearly horse shit. Sure, it has more numbers and many more metrics but that does not make it more accountable, it makes it less so.”


In general, marketers can’t always take metrics at face value. We have to get savvier and more sophisticated at questioning the numbers we use. We have to beware of faux metrics and fuzzy math....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, October 3, 2016 10:40 AM

Marketing is more measurable than ever. But many of those measurements come from black boxes that marketers don’t fully understand. Tom Fishburne adds his voice and humor to the need for transparency.

Camello Verde Colombia's curator insight, October 3, 2016 10:36 PM

Infinite possibilities for Marketers :)

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Rubric for Deeper Thinking About Learning

Rubric for Deeper Thinking About Learning | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
We were exploring how to make metacognitive thinking more visible for our students, keeping it aligned with our mandate to keep thinking and learning visible, transparent, tangible, critiqueable and accountable within learning spaces.

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Robyn Lockwood's curator insight, October 11, 2016 2:42 PM
Share your insight
Helen Teague's curator insight, October 11, 2016 2:49 PM
Don't often see a rubric specifically for metacognition: Rubric for Deeper Thinking About Learning
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, October 12, 2016 10:44 AM
Interesting rubric for self assessment to make metacognition more accessible for our students. Check it out!

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Why It’s Time to Let Go of ‘Meritocracy’

Why It’s Time to Let Go of ‘Meritocracy’ | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
Let's raise all the boats in the harbor, rather than focus on those that are already shiny and seaworthy.

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The World's #1 Leadership Thinker on How You Can Succeed Too

The World's #1 Leadership Thinker on How You Can Succeed Too | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
Faced with the challenge of nowhere to go but down, Marshall Goldsmith offers the world his wisdom, and keeps going up

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Cognitive Bias Cheat Sheet

Cognitive Bias Cheat Sheet | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

Cognitive biases are just tools, useful in the right contexts, harmful in others. They’re the only tools we’ve got, and they’re even pretty good at what they’re meant to do. We might as well get familiar with them and even appreciate that we at least have some ability to process the universe with our mysterious brains.

 


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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 18, 2016 4:12 PM

Four problems that biases help us address:

 

Problem 1: Too much information.

There is just too much information in the world, we have no choice but to filter almost all of it out. Our brain uses a few simple tricks to pick out the bits of information that are most likely going to be useful in some way.

 

Problem 2: Not enough meaning.

The world is very confusing, and we end up only seeing a tiny sliver of it, but we need to make some sense of it in order to survive. Once the reduced stream of information comes in, we connect the dots, fill in the gaps with stuff we already think we know, and update our mental models of the world.

 

Problem 3: Need to act fast.

We’re constrained by time and information, and yet we can’t let that paralyze us. Without the ability to act fast in the face of uncertainty, we surely would have perished as a species long ago. With every piece of new information, we need to do our best to assess our ability to affect the situation, apply it to decisions, simulate the future to predict what might happen next, and otherwise act on our new insight.

 

Problem 4: What should we remember?

There’s too much information in the universe. We can only afford to keep around the bits that are most likely to prove useful in the future. We need to make constant bets and trade-offs around what we try to remember and what we forget. For example, we prefer generalizations over specifics because they take up less space. When there are lots of irreducible details, we pick out a few standout items to save and discard the rest. What we save here is what is most likely to inform our filters related to problem 1’s information overload, as well as inform what comes to mind during the processes mentioned in problem 2 around filling in incomplete information. It’s all self-reinforcing.

Dave Wood's curator insight, September 18, 2016 6:39 PM
Fascinating article that culminated in a summary  of the range of cognitive biases that underlie flawed thinking (our own and others).  Good coaching surfaces assumptions and biases and tests them.
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What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness

What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. 

 


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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, January 2, 2016 8:26 AM

As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.

 

 

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Elon Musk and Bill Thurston on the Power of Thinking for Yourself

Elon Musk and Bill Thurston on the Power of Thinking for Yourself | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
Self-taught mental models — or, in simple terms, figuring things out for yourself — seem to be a favorite weapon of brilliant minds. (Richard Feynman, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist, also relied heavily on personal mental models.) In many cases, it is the unique point-of-view afforded by self-directed learning and deep thought that enables someone to unleash an idea of minor genius.
How can you go about developing a unique view of the world?

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David Hain's curator insight, December 20, 2016 9:53 AM

A clarion call to get back to first principles to sharpen your thinking - but you'll probably have to unlearn that school rote exam stuff first!

donhornsby's curator insight, December 20, 2016 7:00 PM
We often live life by analogy and simply assume that what has been true before must be true in the future. Instead, break your problems down to their first principles and you may see very different solutions emerge.
 
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Carol Dweck Explains The “False” Growth Mindset That Worries Her | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU 

Carol Dweck Explains The “False” Growth Mindset That Worries Her | #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU  | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
False growth mindset is saying you have growth mindset when you don’t really have it or you don’t really understand [what it is]. It’s also false in the sense that nobody has a growth mindset in everything all the time. Everyone is a mixture of fixed and growth mindsets. You could have a predominant growth mindset in an area but there can still be things that trigger you into a fixed mindset trait.

 

Something really challenging and outside your comfort zone can trigger it, or, if you encounter someone who is much better than you at something you pride yourself on, you can think “Oh, that person has ability, not me.” So I think we all, students and adults, have to look for our fixed-mindset triggers and understand when we are falling into that mindset.

I think a lot of what happened [with false growth mindset among educators] is that instead of taking this long and difficult journey, where you work on understanding your triggers, working with them, and over time being able to stay in a growth mindset more and more, many educators just said, “Oh yeah, I have a growth mindset” because either they know it’s the right mindset to have or they understood it in a way that made it seem easy.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/11/14/pssst-the-most-important-in-education-understanding/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/getting-ready-for-modern-education-first-try-to-understand-what-it-is/

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, December 16, 2016 3:38 PM
False growth mindset is saying you have growth mindset when you don’t really have it or you don’t really understand [what it is]. It’s also false in the sense that nobody has a growth mindset in everything all the time. Everyone is a mixture of fixed and growth mindsets. You could have a predominant growth mindset in an area but there can still be things that trigger you into a fixed mindset trait.

 

Something really challenging and outside your comfort zone can trigger it, or, if you encounter someone who is much better than you at something you pride yourself on, you can think “Oh, that person has ability, not me.” So I think we all, students and adults, have to look for our fixed-mindset triggers and understand when we are falling into that mindset.

I think a lot of what happened [with false growth mindset among educators] is that instead of taking this long and difficult journey, where you work on understanding your triggers, working with them, and over time being able to stay in a growth mindset more and more, many educators just said, “Oh yeah, I have a growth mindset” because either they know it’s the right mindset to have or they understood it in a way that made it seem easy.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/11/14/pssst-the-most-important-in-education-understanding/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/getting-ready-for-modern-education-first-try-to-understand-what-it-is/

 

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The Neuroscience of Perseverance

The Neuroscience of Perseverance | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

To produce more dopamine, get in the habit of setting deadlines and completing goals in a timely manner. Create a daily schedule that includes self-imposed deadlines and stick to it! Use timers, calendars and peer pressure to keep you on track and condition yourself. Partner with a like-minded friend who has similar goals and make a pact that you will hold one another accountable to stay on deadline.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, December 3, 2016 1:41 AM

Good techniques to help students feel more successful.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, December 8, 2016 3:52 AM

Useful post, presenting an interesting vision of the theme. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in people management, please visit http://blogwgs.tumblr.com/

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Pygmalion in Management

Pygmalion in Management | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
How can you get the best out of your employees? Expect the best.

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What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness

What makes a good life? Lessons from the longest study on happiness | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it's fame and money, you're not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you're mistaken. 

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, January 2, 2016 8:26 AM

As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction. In this talk, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life.

 

 

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Why Diverse Teams Are Smarter

Why Diverse Teams Are Smarter | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

Diverse teams are more likely to constantly reexamine facts and remain objective. They may also encourage greater scrutiny of each member’s actions, keeping their joint cognitive resources sharp and vigilant.

 


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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 14, 2016 9:57 AM

Team building is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about team building can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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In Digital Transformation, culture change goes hand in hand with tech change

In Digital Transformation, culture change goes hand in hand with tech change | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
The framework is balanced so it neither focus on technology or change management. In fact, the starting point must be one that steadily shifts both the technology foundation and the people of the organization in unison towards both planned goals and emergent opportunities. This starting point then continues to evolve as it learns from early experience. The overall process usually works best when realized on a supporting platform that enables open communication, enterprise-wide learning, digital channel leadership, stakeholder empowerment, and enablement of a network of change agents across the organization. This is the change platform I’ve been discussing in the industry lately, and is typically an online and offline community of practice.

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6 Questions Every Critical Thinker Should Ask

6 Questions Every Critical Thinker Should Ask | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
In an earlier post here in  Educational Technology and Mobile Learning  I talked about the  8 elements of the critical thinking proces

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, October 10, 2016 5:58 PM
Key questions for critical thinking within the teaching and learning environment.
Boutsaba Janetvilay's curator insight, October 10, 2016 10:17 PM
Great questions map of critical thinker!
Daniel Tan's curator insight, February 7, 10:11 PM
Thinking beyond what's in the box
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Leadership Is About Emotion

Leadership Is About Emotion | Agile coaching | Scoop.it

Make a list of the 5 leaders you most admire. They can be from business, social media, politics, technology, the sciences, any field. Now ask yourself why you admire them. The chances are high that your admiration is based on more than their accomplishments, impressive as those may be. I’ll bet that everyone on your list reaches you on an emotional level.

 

This ability to reach people in a way that transcends the intellectual and rational is the mark of a great leader. They all have it. They inspire us. It’s a simple as that. And when we’re inspired we tap into our best selves and deliver amazing work.

 

So, can this ability to touch and inspire people be learned? No and yes. The truth is that not everyone can lead, and there is no substitute for natural talent. Honestly, I’m more convinced of this now – I’m in reality about the world of work and employee engagement. But for those who fall somewhat short of being a natural born star (which is pretty much MANY of us), leadership skills can be acquired, honed and perfected. And when this happens your chances of engaging your talent increases from the time they walk into your culture.

 

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Cameron Larsuel's curator insight, October 17, 2016 6:27 PM

Leadership is emotion, leadership is energy, leadership is you.

Matthias von Wnuk-Lipinski's curator insight, October 18, 2016 3:09 AM
Leadership and Emotion
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, October 18, 2016 4:39 AM

Leadership is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about leadership can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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All Roads Lead to Code - EduTech4Teachers

All Roads Lead to Code - EduTech4Teachers | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
So, why just use technology, when you can build it, right? But first—students need the programming know-how in order to do so… And that begins with you!

Whether you choose to embrace the concept or not, it’s becoming more and more important to equip students with coding skills. It’s the new literacy for a generation of students growing up in a digitally-connected world. Having this knowledge not only strengthens general skills such as critical thinking and problem solving, but it will become invaluable in their future as a wide range of industries are eager to hire individuals with programming abilities.

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Carol Hancox's curator insight, November 6, 2016 7:25 PM
Reasons to teach coding
Educity Pedagogy's curator insight, November 9, 2016 12:01 AM
One of new technology for study of banking exam preparation with video tutorial  of different subject. provide content  on line  and  off line  in pen  drive  and SD  cards  for  more detail   visit us  at  www.oureducity.com 
drula eric's curator insight, November 11, 2016 12:38 AM
Interagir avec vos clients cibles aujourd'hui! Il est facile, il suffit de remplir le formulaire et accéder à la plus performante consommateur ou l'entreprise base de données e-mail dans l'industrie. http://state-of-the-art-mailer.com/splash.php?mid=58135
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12 Critical Competencies For Leadership in the Future

12 Critical Competencies For Leadership in the Future | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
The rate of change in the business world today is greater than our ability to respond. In a world that is often describe…

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Authentis Formations's curator insight, May 6, 2016 3:58 AM
Le leader du futur...le
Ian Berry's curator insight, September 26, 2016 10:41 PM
A good infographic for dealing with disruption
Emerging World's curator insight, September 27, 2016 1:33 AM

Within the business world, the term VUCA is becoming very popular to describe the kind of world in which we live  This graphic and article does a great job is summing up some of the main issues concerning how to lead in this environment.

 

Emerging World

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Becoming Brilliant

Becoming Brilliant | Agile coaching | Scoop.it
In the push to make kids smart, you can spend $300 to count every word your kid hears. Or try to teach the fetus in the womb. But the best way is to change how you look at things.
Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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