Aggregate Intelligence
1.4K views | +0 today
Follow
Aggregate Intelligence
Online content about collective intelligence and complex systems
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Puppies! Now that I’ve got your attention, complexity theory

Animal behavior isn't complicated, but it is complex. Nicolas Perony studies how individual animals -- be they Scottish Terriers, bats or meerkats -- follow simple rules that, collectively, create larger patterns of behavior. And how this complexity born of simplicity can help them adapt to new circumstances, as they arise.

 

http://www.ted.com/talks/nicolas_perony_puppies_now_that_i_ve_got_your_attention_complexity_theory.html


Via Complexity Digest, Jorge Louçã, NESS
António F Fonseca's insight:

The guy seems to be confessing some obscure personal sin but the talk is very interesting.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Decision Intelligence
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Complex Systems: Patterns in Nature

This video provides a basic introduction to the science of complex systems, focusing on patterns in nature. (For more information on agent-based modeling, vi...

Via Lorien Pratt
António F Fonseca's insight:

Agent based modeling still is the best tool to understand complex systems when mathematical modeling gets very complicated.

more...
Lorien Pratt's curator insight, January 30, 2014 6:35 PM

This is a great introduction to the idea of emergent behavior from complex systems.  Many people don't realize that if individuals have very simple behaviors, there can be very complex behaviors when those individuals act in a group.  Understanding these emergent patterns is critical for good decision making, because you need to know how the decision you make will set other elements in the system in motion.  More and more, our social, economic, political, climate, and other realities have this characteristic.   This video focuses on agent-base complex systems, such flocks of birds, schools of fish, or even nanobot swarms to cure cancer. 

Liz Rykert's curator insight, February 10, 2014 7:25 PM

Always looking for good resources to introduce complexity science to others. This looks great. 

Ian Biggs, FAIPM, CPPE's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:08 PM

I recently conducted a series of workshops on the subject of 'Complex Project Management - Navigating through the unknown'. This clip provides a great introduction to complex systems and for those interested in Complexity Science, this clip is worth 7:52 of your time.

Scooped by António F Fonseca
Scoop.it!

Google raises concerns with purchase of 'strong' artificial intelligence developer - allvoices

Google raises concerns with purchase of 'strong' artificial intelligence developer - allvoices | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it
NEWS.com.au
Google raises concerns with purchase of 'strong' artificial intelligence developer
allvoices
Mountain View claims they are building on a chance to break into the field of industry automation, not our collective consciousness.
António F Fonseca's insight:

The owner of a significant portion of earth's curiosity patrimony is turning into deep AI.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from visualizing social media
Scoop.it!

What Social Networks Should You Use in 2014? [INFOGRAPHIC]

What Social Networks Should You Use in 2014? [INFOGRAPHIC] | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it
We’re now into a whole new year – but which social networks should have your full attention this year?

Via Lauren Moss
António F Fonseca's insight:

Good up to date report on global social networking.

more...
Amy Williamson's curator insight, February 5, 2014 5:43 AM

A must read for anyone working in social media!

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, February 20, 2014 1:54 PM

Thanks

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, March 30, 2014 9:16 AM

Do you wonder where to put most of your online time for the best reach to viewers? Here is helpful info to help you decide.

Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Complexity & Systems
Scoop.it!

Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | Yaneer Bar-Yam

Complexity Rising: From Human Beings to Human Civilization, a Complexity Profile | Yaneer Bar-Yam | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it

It is generally recognized that life is becoming more complex. This article analyzes the 
human social environment using the "complexity profile," a mathematical tool for 
characterizing the collective behavior of a system. The analysis is used to justify the 
qualitative observation that complexity of existence has increased and is increasing. The 
increase in complexity is directly related to sweeping changes in the structure and 
dynamics of human civilization—the increasing interdependence of the global economic 
and social system, and the instabilities of dictatorships, communism and corporate 
hierarchies. Our complex social environment is consistent with identifying global human 
civilization as an organism capable of complex behavior that protects its components 
(us) and which should be capable of responding effectively to complex environmental 
demands


Via Bernard Ryefield
António F Fonseca's insight:

Another way of seeing complexity.

more...
Lorien Pratt's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:47 PM

This is so important!  We all feel that things are becoming more complex, now here's some evidence to show we're right. And as we suspected, it comes from increasing interdependence and "sweeping changes in the structure and dynamics of civilization".   Thought so!

Eli Levine's curator insight, February 5, 2014 4:34 PM

You see this in the devolution of religion from hierarchically based forms of morality.

 

Or on the decentralization of wealth from a handful of individuals to the general masses.

 

Or the collaborative work of government, rather than the command and control central systems that dominated the 20th century.

 

We're evolving.

 

And we've only begun this journey.

 

Think about it.

Anastasia Baranowski's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:40 PM

Dear Sirs,

 

I think that people from different nationalities have to have marriages between different nationalities. The idea is multinational planet, where people live everywhere they want and they don't have any ideas of nationalizm or rasism. In this case all people can live in peace and harmony. No wars, only worldwide police. Economical development is possible only if people from different countries can come to each other and co-operate. The most important problem behind the human race is ecological! All people on the planet have to co-operate and communicate and help each other to save the planet and themselves and future generations!

Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Does the internet promote fairness of income distribution?

Does the internet promote fairness of income distribution? | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it

(Phys.org) —The question of how an economic system should be structured in order to best promote fairness and equality is one of the most debated subjects of all time. By approaching the complexities of this question from the field of network science, researchers from MIT and other institutions have found that the average degree to which individuals in a society are connected to each other can crucially affect the fairness of income distribution.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-internet-fairness-income-video.html#jCp


Via NESS
António F Fonseca's insight:

Very interesting problem, see Matthew effect.

more...
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Sistemas complejos
Scoop.it!

éToile Platform

éToile Platform | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it

The éToile Platform is an open, interactive, new way of sharing educational resources for Master and PhD levels in Complexity Sciences domains.

In different modules, students and researchers can:

check their knowledge using the étoile evaluation tests;interact with other people studying the same subjects;use the éToile facilities for studying and researching on the Internet;contribute for an ecology of pedagogical resources;certificated their mastery of a core curriculum in Complexity Sciences;interact with a worldwide community of students and scientific researchers within the CS-Digital Campus.


Via Bernard Ryefield, Complejidady Economía
António F Fonseca's insight:

Portugal is on the first front in Complex Systems Studies.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Talks
Scoop.it!

Next civilization: countering complexity and extreme events

Dirk Helbing Next civilization: countering complexity and extreme events. TEDx Martigny 2013/09/26

Via Complexity Digest
António F Fonseca's insight:

You should listen to this somehow strange speach, strange, perhaps exotic, but very wise and visionary.

more...
John Symons's comment, January 19, 2014 1:58 PM
Dirk needs to read Oskar Morgenstern.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Papers
Scoop.it!

Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment

Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it

Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another's presence. Pairs of participants moved their “avatars” along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other's motions, but only one, the other's avatar, also embodied the other's contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other's avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other's presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment.

 

Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment
Tom Froese, Hiroyuki Iizuka & Takashi Ikegami

Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 3672 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep03672


Via Complexity Digest
António F Fonseca's insight:

More experiments with our social brain.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Networks and Graphs
Scoop.it!

Generalized friendship paradox in complex networks

The friendship paradox states that your friends have on average more friends than you have. Does the paradox "hold'" for other individual characteristics like income or happiness? To address this question, we generalize the friendship paradox for arbitrary node characteristics in complex networks. By analyzing two coauthorship networks of Physical Review journals and Google Scholar profiles, we find that the generalized friendship paradox (GFP) holds at the individual and network levels for various characteristics, including the number of coauthors, the number of citations, and the number of publications. The origin of the GFP is shown to be rooted in positive correlations between degree and characteristics. As a fruitful application of the GFP, we suggest effective and efficient sampling methods for identifying high characteristic nodes in large-scale networks. Our study on the GFP can shed lights on understanding the interplay between network structure and node characteristics in complex networks.


Via Bernard Ryefield
António F Fonseca's insight:

Maybe a good metric to characterize people on social networks, to have more or less friends than the average of their friends.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Papers
Scoop.it!

Epidemics on social networks

Since its first formulations almost a century ago, mathematical models for disease spreading contributed to understand, evaluate and control the epidemic processes.They promoted a dramatic change in how epidemiologists thought of the propagation of infectious diseases.In the last decade, when the traditional epidemiological models seemed to be exhausted, new types of models were developed.These new models incorporated concepts from graph theory to describe and model the underlying social structure.Many of these works merely produced a more detailed extension of the previous results, but some others triggered a completely new paradigm in the mathematical study of epidemic processes. In this review, we will introduce the basic concepts of epidemiology, epidemic modeling and networks, to finally provide a brief description of the most relevant results in the field.

 

Epidemics on social networks
Marcelo N. Kuperman

http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.3838


Via Complexity Digest
António F Fonseca's insight:

A good review about epidemic models in social networks, SIS, SIR, etc ...

more...
Marco Valli's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:08 AM

Basics of SIS/SIR models of spreading epidemics, and their relations to social networks.

Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

US Military Scientists Solve the Fundamental Problem of Viral Marketing | MIT Technology Review

US Military Scientists Solve the Fundamental Problem of Viral Marketing  | MIT Technology Review | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it
Network theorists working for the US military have worked out how to identify the small “seed” group of people who can spread a message across an entire network

Via Spaceweaver
António F Fonseca's insight:

It was already seaked by other groups, they only got sub-modularity properties defining the scope of greedy algorithm's search, these guys seem to be on the right track.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Evolutionary perspectives on collective decision making: Studying the implications of diversity and social network structure with agent-based simulations

Collective, especially group-based, managerial decision making is crucial in organizations. Using an evolutionary theory approach to collective decision making, agent-based simulations were conducted to investigate how collective decision making would be affected by the agents' diversity in problem understanding and/or behavior in discussion, as well as by their social network structure. Simulation results indicated that groups with consistent problem understanding tended to produce higher utility values of ideas and displayed better decision convergence, but only if there was no group-level bias in collective problem understanding. Simulation results also indicated the importance of balance between selection-oriented (i.e., exploitative) and variation-oriented (i.e., explorative) behaviors in discussion to achieve quality final decisions. Expanding the group size and introducing non-trivial social network structure generally improved the quality of ideas at the cost of decision convergence. Simulations with different social network topologies revealed that collective decision making on small-world networks with high local clustering tended to achieve highest decision quality more often than on random or scale-free networks. Implications of this evolutionary theory and simulation approach for future managerial research on collective, group, and multi-level decision making are discussed.

 

Evolutionary perspectives on collective decision making: Studying the implications of diversity and social network structure with agent-based simulations
Hiroki Sayama, Shelley D. Dionne, Francis J. Yammarino

http://arxiv.org/abs/1311.3674


Via Complexity Digest, Shaolin Tan, NESS
António F Fonseca's insight:

Some problems may only be solved through agent-based simulation.

more...
Audiref Cía.'s curator insight, December 28, 2013 11:01 AM

Especialmente el grupo de base, la toma de decisiones colectiva, de gestión es fundamental en las organizaciones. El uso de un enfoque de la teoría evolutiva para la toma de decisiones colectiva, se llevaron a cabo simulaciones basadas en agentes para investigar cómo la toma de decisiones colectiva se vería afectada por la diversidad de los agentes en la comprensión y / o comportamiento en la discusión de problemas, así como por su estructura de red social. Resultados de la simulación indican que los grupos con entendimiento problema constante tienden a producir valores de utilidad más altos de las ideas y muestran una mejor toma de convergencia, pero sólo si no había ningún sesgo a nivel de grupo en la comprensión colectiva problema. 

Scooped by António F Fonseca
Scoop.it!

Super Bowl Ad Chart: Who's Buying What in Super Bowl 2014

super bowl xlviii: ad age's chart of every advertiser in the upcoming super bowl, their creative plans and the agencies behind the scenes.
António F Fonseca's insight:

The 30 second most expensive advertising time should happen today.

Human attention costs money. From the attention needed for the caring in early childhood to the needed attention to convince a consumer, human attention may be the scarcest resource of humanity.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by António F Fonseca
Scoop.it!

Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems

António F Fonseca's insight:

Just before ECCS2014 in September and also in Italy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by António F Fonseca
Scoop.it!

SFI working paper picked as a top business article in 2013

SFI working paper picked as a top business article in 2013 | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it
António F Fonseca's insight:

The paper aims to analise the foundations of economics as a complexity science.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from e-Xploration
Scoop.it!

Le compost de l'intelligence collective | #CI Intelligence Collective Holomidale

Le compost de l'intelligence collective | #CI Intelligence Collective Holomidale | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it
Luc Schuiten, les villes de demain   Il ne faut pas opposer l'ancien système de l'intelligence pyramidale, mourant, à celui, naissant, de l'intelligence collective holomidale. J'entends tout l...

Via Nathalie Carpentier, Claude Emond, luiy
António F Fonseca's insight:

Powerful idea : all new regimes only evolve from and within old ones not ab initio.

more...
luiy's curator insight, January 26, 2014 7:49 AM

Il ne faut pas opposer l’ancien système de l’intelligence pyramidale, mourant, à celui, naissant, de l’intelligence collective holomidale. J’entends tout le temps des gens dire que même s’il y a une innovation sociale indéniable, les outils demeurent le monopole des organisations à intelligence collective pyramidale, faites pour faire du profit et pour contrôler. Les gens qui disent cela opposent des systèmes politiques dans une vision intellectuelle des idéologies. Mes recherches se contentent d’observer l’évolution, pas d’argumenter si tel ou tel système politique devrait prévaloir. De manière pragmatique et concrète, on a une loi du vivant : tout nouvel écosystème doit pousser sur l’ancien. L’ancien, tout en rejetant le nouveau, lui offre les briques fondamentales ainsi que le compost issu de sa propre décomposition. Ses manifestations paroxystiques –plus de concentration des pouvoirs et de l’argent, plus de normalisation, etc– provoquent également une dynamique d’évolution pour ceux qui veulent s’extraire de cette matrice. Ainsi l’intelligence collective holomidale, en attendant de devenir un écosystème social autonome, pousse-t-elle sur le terreau de l’intelligence collective pyramidale. Il y a un processus fractal, complexe et non-linéaire.

 

 

Claude Emond's comment, January 26, 2014 8:25 AM
Le mécanisme décrit (bâtir sur les anciennes fondations) est celui décrit dans la «spyrale dynamique» de Graves, Beck et récupéré par Wilber dans les stages de développement de son modèle du monde AQAL. Je vais vous scooper quelques sites et ouvrages là dessus, au cas où c'est un peu nouveau pour vous :)
Dominique Marot's curator insight, February 7, 2014 5:12 AM

Les grands changements passent par une petite minorité...

Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Complexity & Systems
Scoop.it!

▶ On the Nature of Causality in Complex Systems, George F.R. Ellis - YouTube

Big Bang cosmology, chemical and biological evolutionary theory, and associated sciences have been extraordinarily successful in revealing and enabling us to understand the development of the universe from the Planck era to the present, as well as the emergence of complexity, life, and consciousness here on Earth. After briefly sketching this amazing story, and the key characteristics of nature, this paper will reflect on the different types and levels of causality involved -- stressing the important and pervasive role of highly differentiated and dynamic relationships and networks of relationships. Philosophical considerations build on and enrich scientific ones to probe these relationships. They also take us beyond the limits of strictly scientific methodology to consider and model -- however inadequately -- the ultimate sources of existence and order. This is the issue of creation, which introduces another very different -- and transcendent -- level of causality. We show that this is compatible with the -- and even essential to -- the causalities operative in nature, including those of quantum cosmology, if we acknowledge the limits of physics.

This lecture was delivered by George Ellis during the 16th Kraków Methodological Conference "The Causal Universe", May 17-18, 2012.


Via Bernard Ryefield
António F Fonseca's insight:

Very interesting from the philosophical point of view.

more...
Andrew Glynn's curator insight, January 14, 2014 8:37 AM

As I keep repeating ad nauseum, bottom up causality doesn't work when you go from things of a lower genera (subsystems) to things of a higher genera (system, which may themselves be subsystems of even higher genera).

Zaphod Beeblebrox's curator insight, January 30, 2014 1:39 PM

This really brings up the question - what is the nature of choice inherent in the universe?  If causality defines itself as the operation of a cause onto a single, definable effect, then how does it relate to the POSSIBILITES that exist as a consequence of probability and human limitation?  In other words, can physics be the perpatrator of - and therefore the potential predictor of - what can be viewed as choice as an inexorable consequence of the surrounding conditions?

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 25, 2014 10:59 PM

I've said it several times before.

 

It's going to take a change in the logic of politics, a different program, as it were, to operate and produce a new base level of hardware.  We are bound by some of the lower levels of physics, biology and psychology and the realities of the economic market.  These are the lower level, mechanistic laws that have to be obeyed first, in order to realize what ought to be a common goal of leading relatively happy, prosperous, sustainable and resilient lives.

 

But the politics, by engaging in a different logic that's not meant to benefit only the well to do, will ultimately save itself from collapse and destruction (ironically, the big goal for conservatives, who are so keen on implementing these boot-licking, elite worshipping and poor-punishing programs and policies) and produce a new effect from the established lower level laws that could, potentially, mitigate against major economic and social collapses that, ultimately, ruins the politics as well.

 

Way cool stuff here.  Very relevant for government and governing policy.

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Complex World
Scoop.it!

Twitter Trends Help Researchers Forecast Viral Memes

Twitter Trends Help Researchers Forecast Viral Memes | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it

What makes a meme— an idea, a phrase, an image—go viral? For starters, the meme must have broad appeal, so it can spread not just within communities of like-minded individuals but can leap from one community to the next. Researchers, by mining public Twitter data, have found that a meme's “virality” is often evident from the start. After only a few dozen tweets, a typical viral meme (as defined by tweets using a given hashtag) will already have caught on in numerous communities of Twitter users. In contrast, a meme destined to peter out will resonate in fewer groups.

 


Via Claudia Mihai
António F Fonseca's insight:

Impressive amount of data extracted in only one month, impressive algorithm implementation with such amount of data, not so impressive conclusions.

more...
june holley's curator insight, January 23, 2014 8:31 AM

Some important ideas here for people interested in change.

Premsankar Chakkingal's curator insight, January 30, 2014 8:58 AM

Forecasting the Future Twitter Trends in hashtags

Christian Verstraete's curator insight, February 3, 2014 4:48 AM

Twitter, what happens when things go viral?

Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

How Can the Study of Complexity Transform Our Understanding of the World?

How Can the Study of Complexity Transform Our Understanding of the World? | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it

The “study of complexity” refers to the attempt to find common principles underlying the behavior of complex systems—systems in which large collections of components interact in nonlinear ways. Here, the term nonlinear implies that the system can’t be understood simply by understanding its individual components; nonlinear interactions cause the whole to be “more than the sum of its parts.”

 

How Can the Study of Complexity Transform Our Understanding of the World?

Melanie Mitchell

https://www.bigquestionsonline.com/content/how-can-study-complexity-transform-our-understanding-world


Via Complexity Digest, Complejidady Economía, NESS
António F Fonseca's insight:

Wonderful and clarifying text.

more...
Lorien Pratt's curator insight, January 22, 2014 11:20 PM

One of my favorite complexity authors.  An excerpt: "In the past it was widely assumed that such phenomena are hard to predict because the underlying processes are highly complex, and that random factors must play a key role.  However, Complex Systems science—especially the study of dynamics and chaos—have shown that complex behavior and unpredictability can arise in a system even if the underlying rules are extremely simple and completely deterministic.  Often, the key to complexity is the iteration over time of simple, though nonlinear, interaction rules among the system’s components."


This insight is at the core of Decision Intelligence, which adds an understanding of these emergent behaviors to the usual big data/predictive analytics/optimization stack.

Rescooped by António F Fonseca from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

ECCS'14 European Conference on Complex Systems

ECCS'14 European Conference on Complex Systems | Aggregate Intelligence | Scoop.it

ECCS’14 will be a major international conference and event in the area of complex systems and interdisciplinary science in general. It will offer unique opportunities to study novel scientific approaches in a multitude of application areas. Two days of the conference, 24 and 25 of September, are reserved for satellite meetings, which will cover a broad range of subjects on all aspects of Complex Systems, as reflected by the conference tracks.

 

ECCS'14 European Conference on Complex Systems

Lucca, Italy

2014-09-22:26

http://www.eccs14.eu


Via Complexity Digest
António F Fonseca's insight:

The major conference in Complex Systems this year will be held in Lucca.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by António F Fonseca
Scoop.it!

22. Emergence and Complexity - YouTube

(May 21, 2010) Professor Robert Sapolsky gives a lecture on emergence and complexity. He details how a small difference at one place in nature can have a hug...
António F Fonseca's insight:

A long but very interesting lecture about Emergence and Complexity from Stanford.

more...
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from CxBooks
Scoop.it!

Guided Self-Organization: Inception (Emergence, Complexity and Computation): Mikhail Prokopenko

Is it possible to guide the process of self-organisation towards specific patterns and outcomes? Wouldn’t this be self-contradictory? After all, a self-organising process assumes a transition into a more organised form, or towards a more structured functionality, in the absence of centralised control. Then how can we place the guiding elements so that they do not override rich choices potentially discoverable by an uncontrolled process?
This book presents different approaches to resolving this paradox. In doing so, the presented studies address a broad range of phenomena, ranging from autopoietic systems to morphological computation, and from small-world networks to information cascades in swarms. A large variety of methods is employed, from spontaneous symmetry breaking to information dynamics to evolutionary algorithms, creating a rich spectrum reflecting this emerging field.
Demonstrating several foundational theories and frameworks, as well as innovative practical implementations, Guided Self-Organisation: Inception, will be an invaluable tool for advanced students and researchers in a multiplicity of fields across computer science, physics and biology, including information theory, robotics, dynamical systems, graph theory, artificial life, multi-agent systems, theory of computation and machine learning.


Via Complexity Digest
António F Fonseca's insight:

A potpourri about self organization, maybe good ideas for new theories.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by António F Fonseca from Non-Equilibrium Social Science
Scoop.it!

Eric Berlow: Simplifying complexity

Ecologist Eric Berlow doesn't feel overwhelmed when faced with complex systems. He knows that more information can lead to a better, simpler solution.

Via NESS
António F Fonseca's insight:

"Complexity is not allways complicated"

more...
No comment yet.