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The EU’s Carbon Footprint Is Bigger Than You Think | Human Nature - Conservation International Blog

The EU’s Carbon Footprint Is Bigger Than You Think | Human Nature - Conservation International Blog | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Since 1990, the EU has massively increased its imports of carbon-intensive products. (Did you know? Since 1990, the EU has decreased carbon emissions 8%, but massively increased carbon imports.
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Aggregate Demand and Supply
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ECB cuts growth and inflation outlook

The European Central Bank (ECB) has cut its inflation and growth forecasts for 2015 and the next two years. It expects inflation in the eurozone to remain "very ...
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US trade deficit smallest in five months - CNBC

US trade deficit smallest in five months - CNBC | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
The Commerce Department said on Thursday the trade gap narrowed 7.4 percent to $41.9 billion.
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Biggest food and drink companies found to be ignoring impact on climate

Biggest food and drink companies found to be ignoring impact on climate | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
CDP analysis finds fewer than a quarter of food, beverage and tobacco brands report agricultural emissions
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Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from Developments in the UK Economy
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Newton Aycliffe's Hitachi train plant opens - BBC News

Newton Aycliffe's Hitachi train plant opens - BBC News | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
An £82m factory for manufacturing high-speed Intercity trains is officially opened in County Durham.

Via Geoff Riley
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Geoff Riley's curator insight, September 3, 12:40 PM

This is another boost to the economic fortunes of the North East. Hot on the heels of a new £100m investment in car manufacturing from Nissan, Hitachi have opened their train plant at Newton Aycliffe in County Durham. The factor will employ over 700 people directly and there will be (we hope) strong multiplier effects from the gains in disposable income from these jobs and from extra employment among Hitachi's main contractors. 

 

Long term of potentially more significance is a rebound in highly-skilled manufacturing work for a region that has suffered grievously over the last thirty years or more. If the Northern Powerhouse plan is to become a reality we need more of these landmark investment projects to arrive in the North East and help address the gap in per capita incomes and persistently higher unemployment.

 

The arrival of fresh private sector jobs will also tilt the balance of employment a little further away from a heavy dependence on public sector jobs in the region. 

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Lucky Britain to win 21st century jackpot from carbon capture - Telegraph.co.uk

Lucky Britain to win 21st century jackpot from carbon capture - Telegraph.co.uk | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Once tougher UN climate rules come into force, rare storage sites for carbon will be worth more than unburnable oil and gas reserves
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Low growth, low wages, low exports: GDP figures are no laughing matter - The Guardian

Low growth, low wages, low exports: GDP figures are no laughing matter - The Guardian | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Joe Hockey’s clowns comment may come back to haunt him as defence and housing sector were the only bright spots in a gloomy picture of the economy
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Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from Microeconomics: Pre-U Economics
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Booker given green light for Budgens and Londis deal

Booker given green light for Budgens and Londis deal | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
The Competition and Markets Authority has approved Booker's £40m takeover of the grocery chains

Via Graham Watson
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Graham Watson's curator insight, September 3, 3:33 AM

An interesting merger: vertical forward integration, as Booker gets CMA approval for its takeover of budget chains, Londis and Budgens. You might start to think about what the potential reasons for such a merger are as well as the potential benefits of the move.

 

There are also potential drawbacks too: however, I suspect that the companies are probably a pretty good fit in many regards.

Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from Macroeconomics: UK economy Pre-U Economics
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Nissan invests £100m in Sunderland plant - BBC News

Nissan invests £100m in Sunderland plant - BBC News | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Japanese carmaker Nissan announces it will invest £100m in its UK plant at Sunderland to build the new Juke model.

Via Graham Watson
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Graham Watson's curator insight, September 3, 3:08 AM

Proof, if it were needed that the UK motor industry is in good health, although, of course, unlike 30 years ago it's all foreign-owned. This article highlights a significant inward investment by Nissan to a relatively low income region and thus there is the potential for positive multiplier effects.

 

Of course, those with an eye for industrial history will be amused by the fact that British car factory workers are the most productive in Europe - but only under foreign management. Under British management, the industry was plagued by industrial unrest. However, we're now producing on such as scale that "according to Prof David Bailey from Aston Business School, Nissan's Sunderland plant makes more cars than the whole of the Italian car industry." A remarkable fact.

Claudia Gasparro's curator insight, September 4, 4:29 PM

Interesting that the UK is attracting foreign investments, such as a hugely well known company like Nissan was attracted, as usually it isn the other way around. Therefore this will attract further investment which will eventually create more jobs for many unemployed  people in Britain. These knock on effects will gradually grow Britain's economy, making it a popular country for foreign investment. However, a lot of money will be taken out of the UK as the TNC, in this case Japan, will be taking almost all of the profits made from this investment. 

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Tesco to pay farmers more for milk used in cheese production

Tesco to pay farmers more for milk used in cheese production | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Farmers’ union welcomes move by UK’s biggest retailer to pay price based on cost of production as significant

Via Graham Watson
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Graham Watson's curator insight, September 2, 1:15 PM

More movement in the dairy sector where Tesco has agreed to increase the price that it pays for milk used in cheese. Is this indicative of the oligopolistic nature of the market, given that others have adopted this strategy? What else might be motivating Tesco?

 

Perhaps one thing that might be making a difference at the margin is that fact that the supermarkets have been making sizeable profit on cheese sales. Up until recently milk prices were falling but supermarkets were successful in maintaining or even increasing the price of cheese.

 

You might think about the nature of information within the market - consumers won't have much information about factor costs, and supermarkets might have been able to spin the yarn about higher energy and other costs as a reason for increases in the price of cheese. And if you want proof that it's highly profitable, have a good look at your supermarket dairy aisle. Certainly, there have been a number of cheese promotions at Tesco in the last year.

Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from Macroeconomics: UK economy Pre-U Economics
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UK exports and business investment help second-quarter GDP growth

UK exports and business investment help second-quarter GDP growth | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
ONS data shows net trade made its biggest contribution to growth in four years, as 0.7% increase in GDP is confirmed

Via Graham Watson
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Graham Watson's curator insight, August 28, 10:26 AM

The Guardian take on the 'recovery': another lovely example of why it's important to be aware of the political leanings of the press. This article is keen to point out the lack of growth in manufacturing and highlights quite a remarkable fact - GDP per capita is still beneath the pre-downturn peak of 2008. 

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Second-quarter UK growth steady at 0.7% - BBC News

Second-quarter UK growth steady at 0.7% - BBC News | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it

GDP UK economic growth for the second quarter of the year was unrevised at 0.7%, official figures have shown.


Via Graham Watson
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Graham Watson's curator insight, August 28, 8:00 AM

UK GDP continues to head in the right direction - the figure for Q" remains unrevised at 0.7% and this is a clear indication that the economy is on the right track in this regard, with the recovery likely to be sustained.

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How China's economic slowdown could weigh on the rest of the world

How China's economic slowdown could weigh on the rest of the world | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
China’s faltering economy is the destination for large proportions of many countries’ export sectors, in some cases for substantial proportions of GDP.
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George Osborne: UK 'not immune' to China turmoil - BBC News

George Osborne: UK 'not immune' to China turmoil - BBC News | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
George Osborne says the UK needs to be "better prepared" for global shocks but Labour accuses him of "complacency".
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China poses threat to global growth, IMF warns - BBC News

China poses threat to global growth, IMF warns - BBC News | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Slower growth in China and continuing stock market uncertainty pose a threat to global economic growth, the International Monetary Fund has warned.
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Pizza Express reverses policy of taking 8% cut from staff tips - The Guardian

Pizza Express reverses policy of taking 8% cut from staff tips - The Guardian | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Pizza chain becomes latest restaurant to change its policy following a union campaign against the practice
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Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from Developments in the UK Economy
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Economic growth will not be the answer to the UK's housing crisis

Economic growth will not be the answer to the UK's housing crisis | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Britain’s economy is likely to grow but so too will house prices and rents, prolonging the country’s crisis of unaffordable housing

Via Geoff Riley
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Geoff Riley's curator insight, September 3, 12:16 PM
Vicky Pryce is a vastly experienced economist with a strong reputation for her work in competition policy. In this piece for the Guardian, Pryce returns to a familiar theme for students aware of how a lack of new house-building acts as a constraint on economic growth. The shortage of properties raises average prices which is goo news for those already established on the housing ladder, but awful for millions of (mainly) young people who simply cannot afford to buy. And rising prices also lead to an increase in property rents (the main substitute for buying) which eats into the effective disposable income of people. Pryce argues that sorting out the housing crisis will be a three-parliament project, how dispiriting and even that will require political will that seems to be in short supply in Westminster these days.
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UK construction growth edges higher in August - The Guardian

UK construction growth edges higher in August - The Guardian | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Positive PMI data raises hopes that building sector can make stronger contribution to economic growth
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Why low-income families will be worse off with George Osborne's minimum wage

Why low-income families will be worse off with George Osborne's minimum wage | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
A family with two children, with two adults over 25 working 35 hours a week on the national minimum wage is set to lose £1,615 a year
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Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from Business Studies
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What The Heck Is GDP?

GDP, GNP – what does it all mean? Jonathan explains what economists mean when they bring up these common economic indicators. Learn more at ...

Via GCS Business Studies
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Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from Microeconomics: Pre-U Economics
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Will you benefit from increases in the minimum wage?

Will you benefit from increases in the minimum wage? | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Women, pensioners and part-time workers stand to gain most from increases in the minimum wage, new research shows. Are you one of them?

Via Graham Watson
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Graham Watson's curator insight, September 3, 3:30 AM

Just the byline Szu Ping Chan should be enough to suggest a student-friendly take on an economic issue, and this piece on the living wage is no different. Lots of lovely data...enjoy.

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South African team may have solved solar puzzle even Google couldn't crack

South African team may have solved solar puzzle even Google couldn't crack | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it

Pioneering technology to deliver the cheapest, small-scale concentrated solar power plants in the world could revolutionise the renewable energy market 

 

The idea behind the design – so-called Concentrated Solar Power or CSP – is simple. A field of mirrors on the ground tracks the sun and concentrates its rays on to a central point which heats up. That heat is converted into electricity. 

 

“We are developing plonkable heliostats. Plonkable means that from factory to installation you can just drop them down on to the ground and they work.”


So no costly cement, no highly-trained workforce, no wires, just two workers to lay out the steel frames on the ground and a streetlight-style central tower.

 

 
Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, September 2, 1:40 PM

Concentrated solar uses the energy-rich infrared band of solar radiation and it has great promise, but it depends on simple and cheap tech being developed to capture and convert that heat to electricity.

Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from Macroeconomics: UK economy Pre-U Economics
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Young face a bleak future in UK’s flawed jobs market

Young face a bleak future in UK’s flawed jobs market | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
More than half of Britain’s graduates are in non-graduate jobs. Apprentice pay is pitifully low. The outlook is becoming truly disheartening

Via Graham Watson
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Graham Watson's curator insight, August 31, 9:30 AM

Another supply-side bottleneck - the issue of getting the young into appropriate work is covered in this Katie Allen piece in the Observer. It starts with the contention that a large proportion of graduates are in non-graduate jobs and then broadens the discussion to look at other areas where the education system appears to be generating sub-optimal outcomes.

 

Again, there's a lot of interest here - can the student loan scheme be viable with such a high level of non-payment? If so, is this an example of government failure?

 

Equally, can we be clear about any 'graduate'/'non-graduate' dividing line? Surely, there are some degree courses where being a 'graduate' is an imperfect signal regarding skills and so on. (Perhaps you might argue it is closer to perfect signalling if it is these people who are precluded from getting jobs!)

 

Add in reflecting about potential solutions to the problem of youth unemployment, immigration and you've got a lot of labour market/unemployment issues to think about.

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Chain store prices are far from the biggest rip-off in our hospitals - The Guardian

Chain store prices are far from the biggest rip-off in our hospitals - The Guardian | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Phone charges are finally on the way down, but those for a personal television are still too high – assuming you can work the controls

Via GCS Business Studies
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Rescooped by Bruce Fellowes from #Econ1 Intro Economics and The Market Mechanism
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Supply: Another Commodity Down: Sugar Falls to Six-Year Low

Supply: Another Commodity Down: Sugar Falls to Six-Year Low | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it

Via Matt Smith
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China's slowdown and cheap oil - BBC News

China's slowdown and cheap oil - BBC News | Aggregate Demand and Supply | Scoop.it
Andrew Walker looks at China's slowdown and the impact of the drop in the oil price across the world.

Via Graham Watson
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Graham Watson's curator insight, August 26, 3:23 PM

This BBC article allows for another, more nuanced perspective on the current chaos in China. In this case, it considers the oil industry - appropriately, given that China is the world's largest importer.

 

Given the reduction in Chinese demand, combined with increases in supply, the price has collapsed: however, what that means for different economies, and different economic agents differs depending upon the perspective that you adopt. And when you factor in the prospect of Iran being permitted to start exporting oil, the prospects for oil prices and most exporters aren't good.