age demographics
54 views | +0 today
Follow
age demographics
Workforce age demographics and cross-generational perspectives to sell products and services to Boomers, Millennials, Gen x, Gen Y.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Marilyn Moats Kennedy
Scoop.it!

Boomers' retirement confidence sinks - MarketWatch (blog)

Boomers' retirement confidence sinks - MarketWatch (blog) | age demographics | Scoop.it
Boomers' retirement confidence sinks MarketWatch (blog) According to an IRI survey of 802 Americans ages 50 to 66, which will be released on April 8–to kick off National Retirement Planning Week, in case you were wondering –the percentage of baby...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marilyn Moats Kennedy
Scoop.it!

The status of baby boomers' health in the United States: the healthiest ... - Dentistry IQ

The status of baby boomers' health in the United States: the healthiest ... - Dentistry IQ | age demographics | Scoop.it
Dentistry IQ
The status of baby boomers' health in the United States: the healthiest ...
Dentistry IQ
As baby boomers move into their 60s and 70s, it is projected that they will utilize the healthcare system more than ever before.
Marilyn Moats Kennedy's insight:

A must read. Note the stats on boomer health

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marilyn Moats Kennedy from #HR #RRHH Making love and making personal #branding #leadership
Scoop.it!

7 Surprising Ways To Motivate Millennial Workers - Forbes

7 Surprising Ways To Motivate Millennial Workers - Forbes | age demographics | Scoop.it

There are an estimated80 million young Americans who belong to the so-called millennial generation, roughly ages 18 to 35. By next year, they are expected to comprise 36% of the U.S. workforce, and by 2020, millennials will be nearly half of all workers.

While millennials are the most educated and culturally diverse of any generation before them, they’re also notorious job-hoppers who dislike bureaucracy and distrust traditional hierarchies—leaving many business leaders scratching their heads. What motivates this rising cohort? How do you keep them engaged, earn their trust and get the most out them? Leadership and millennial experts weighed in with a few surprising—and surprisingly easy—ways to inspire millennial workers.

Explain The Company Vision

“If you can explain the whole picture, it connects the meaning to the person,” says Jeremy Kingsley, leadership expert and author of Inspired People Produce Results. Millennial workers are more likely to look for meaning and impact in their work and aren’t satisfied simply punching a clock. Helping them understand their role in a larger plan gives them a clearer sense of purpose. ”It makes them feel valued, which in turn boosts productivity,” says Kingsley.

 

Prioritize Community Service

A comprehensive study by the Pew Research Center in 2010 found that millennials place a higher priority on helping people in need (21%) than having a high-paying career (15%). Dan Epstein, the CEO of business consultancy ReSource Pro who has a staff comprised of 90% millennials, says allowing employees to form committees and use company resources or time to organize their causes meets their desire for social consciousness. Whether it’s weekends with Habitat for Humanity or time off to run in charity marathons, the company’s encouragement helps them feel good about the company. “In order to tap into their creative energy,” Epstein says, “we need to be respectful of the things they care about.

Develop In-Between Steps And Titles

More than their Baby Boomer parents or Gen X older siblings, millennials are especially eager to progress in their careers and less willing to wait three to five years for a promotion. “By developing in-between steps and titles, managers can meet their desire for career progression,” says Epstein. “It also provides incremental training and experience that will aid them later with larger career advancement opportunities.

Give Encouragement And Regular Feedback

“This generation responds well to encouragement and immediate feedback,” says Kingsley. “People need to know they’re being noticed.” The good news? It’s free. A simple “thank you,” “congratulations” or honest, supportive feedback from a manager can make all the difference, fueling their motivation to produce results. While the millennial generation has been criticized as being needy or wanting undue rewards, Kingsley says there’s a balance to be found. Make it clear from the beginning that you reward good work, and then keep an open line of communication to let them know how they’re doing and how they can improve.

 

Offer More Flexibility

Work-life balance is one of the most significant drivers of employee retention among millennials. This tech-savvy generation is essentially able to work anytime from anywhere with an Internet connection. Thus, seemingly arbitrary work hours or having to sit at a desk all day is less appealing to them. A 2012 study of the generation by Griffith Insurance Education Foundation discovered that millennials will sacrifice pay for increased vacation time and the ability to work outside the office. Offering flexible scheduling, occasional telecommuting or even unlimited vacation time—provided performance remains consistent—can meet their desire for flexibility while also showing your trust.

Provide Education And Professional Development

According to a 2012 survey by staffing agency Adecco, 68% of recent graduates identified good opportunities for growth and development as one of their top professional priorities. “Most in this group are hungry and want to advance,” says Kingsley. “If you do not provide development, it’s like a slap in the face.” Assigning stretch projects, bringing in speakers or sending employees to leadership conferences will be especially helpful for those millennial workers interested in learning and growing their skills.

 

Give Them Time For Personal Projects

“On a regular basis, allow team members to work on whatever they want,” says Tim Elmore, the founder and president of Growing Leaders, a non-profit dedicated to youth leadership development. Progressive companies like 3M and Google have had success offering employees time to work on a project of their choosing, helping them feel more engaged and in control and also boosting innovation within the company. “This allows young employees to take initiative, be creative and produce something on their own.”


Via Laura Goodrich, David Hain, Ricard Lloria
more...
Laura Goodrich's curator insight, March 14, 2013 9:54 PM

By 2020, millennials will comprise nearly half of the U.S. workforce.

ManpowerGroup France's curator insight, March 18, 2013 7:03 AM

Les jeunes ont la mobilité dans le sang ! Près des trois quarts (71%) des natifs de la « génération Z » (ou, "Millenial Workers", nés entre 1995 et 2000) souhaitent connaître une expérience professionnelle à l’international afin de développer leurs compétences. Les entreprises devraient donc préparer dès maintenant des « stratégies de mobilité des talents » (talent mobility strategies) pour soutenir l’attractivité de leur marque employeur. Elles devront se montrer pro-actives, agiles et capables de se réinventer constamment.


http://www.manpowergroup.fr/infographie-du-mercredi-mobilite-en-2020-un-marche-mondial-des-talents/

Rescooped by Marilyn Moats Kennedy from Mesurer le Capital Humain
Scoop.it!

As Boomers Retire, Look to Leadership Development - Associations Now

As Boomers Retire, Look to Leadership Development - Associations Now | age demographics | Scoop.it
As Boomers Retire, Look to Leadership Development
Associations Now
As Boomers Retire, Look to Leadership Development. By Rob Stott / Mar 13, 2013.

Via Andrée Laforge
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marilyn Moats Kennedy
Scoop.it!

Baby Boomers Start Over With New Careers - Monroe Evening News

Baby Boomers Start Over With New Careers - Monroe Evening News | age demographics | Scoop.it
Baby Boomers Start Over With New Careers
Monroe Evening News
In their fifth and sixth decades, many baby boomers are finding a surprising twist to what they had envisioned for their lives.
Marilyn Moats Kennedy's insight:

Find real world examples of Boomers who feel under employed if not shut out of the job market entirely reinventing themselves.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marilyn Moats Kennedy
Scoop.it!

Move Over Baby Boomers, Generation Y Will Usher in the Next Investing Boom ... - Yahoo! Finance (blog)

Move Over Baby Boomers, Generation Y Will Usher in the Next Investing Boom ... - Yahoo! Finance (blog) | age demographics | Scoop.it
Move Over Baby Boomers, Generation Y Will Usher in the Next Investing Boom ...
Yahoo! Finance (blog)
"The Generation-Y or Millenial generation is 19 to -35 years old and makes up 27% of the U.S.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marilyn Moats Kennedy from #HR #RRHH Making love and making personal #branding #leadership
Scoop.it!

The Talent Paradox: Despite High Unemployment, Two-Thirds Of Your Employees Are Ready To Bail | Fast Company

The Talent Paradox: Despite High Unemployment, Two-Thirds Of Your Employees Are Ready To Bail | Fast Company | age demographics | Scoop.it
Unemployment has been high for far too long, and voluntary turnover has slowed to a crawl in just about every sector of the economy. So why are employers worried about a talent shortage?

Unemployment has been high for far too long, and voluntary turnover has slowed to a crawl in just about every sector of the economy. So why are employers worried about a talent shortage? 

That's the paradox Deloitte has been tracking since 2010 in its longitudinal survey series, "Talent Edge 2020." The latest report, released in January 2012, asked executives to list their three most pressing concerns about talent. The top concern for corporate leaders was brain drain--over 70% were highly concerned about retaining critical talent over the next year; two-thirds expressed the same concerns about high-potential employees.

These worries are well founded. Only about one-third of employees at larger companies expect to stay with their employers when the recession ends. Of course, employees with mission-critical leadership skills don't even need to wait for the economic tide to turn, and many are not. 

And leadership is key. As Good to Great author Jim Collins has demonstrated, leadership drives great business performance; the absence of leadership doesn’t just invite poor performance, it actually creates risk.

Creating Leaders

People often describe certain individuals as “natural-born leaders,” but the truth is that business leaders are made, not born--shaped through the assignments they receive and the experiences they have. That formation can happen by accident or by design. Leaving leadership development to chance can be chaotic and unpredictable; organizations that want to ensure that they have the leaders they need, now and in the future, would do well to embrace leadership development by design.

Most of the executives in the latest survey agreed that leadership development is a high priority at their companies, but few believe their organization’s capabilities are up to the challenge. And while over half the companies surveyed identified leadership development as an important priority, there remains a large disparity in how they put this into action. 

Some companies remain reluctant to invest heavily in training because chances are that some of the people they’re investing in may eventually take their newly honed skills elsewhere. Turnover is a fact of life in business today, but by investing in employees, by demonstrating a genuine concern for their career development, by enhancing their skills, we can create and retain more high-performing, high-potential leaders.

Though some will inevitably leave, it is important that the investment in them is not seen as a loss. These individuals become valued alumni--some of whom may return in time--and potential clients, who can appreciate firsthand the benefits that accrued from the organizations where the focus was on education and development. It’s a strong value proposition for businesses, and it’s attracting a lot of attention.

At Deloitte, the centerpiece of our leadership development and retention strategy is Deloitte University in Westlake, Texas, where we help our people build the capabilities to better deliver valuable insights and to address our clients’ most critical and complex business challenges.

Not every organization is going to be willing or able to make such a massive investment--nor is it a quick fix, and the talent paradox is a challenge that must be addressed immediately. There are steps a business can take right now to prevent the impending brain drain.

Immediate Steps for Developing Tomorrow’s Leaders 

If two out of three members of the workforce are considering leaving their jobs once the economy improves, it implies a deep reservoir of personal dissatisfaction across the entire corporate sector.

Here are a few thoughts businesses should take into consideration to ensure high-performing talent feels a combination of purpose, impact, and mastery in their current jobs--and are ready, willing, and able to serve as the leaders of the future.

1. Identify your next generation of leaders--and then ask them to step up.  Leadership should not wait for the best talent to come to them--at that point, they may already be on the way out the door. Instead, prioritize and reach out to the people that demonstrate the most leadership potential. Create a plan together that aligns their goals and career satisfaction with the overall business strategy. Whether they are members of the Boomer generation, Gen X, or Gen Y, employees across the board say promotion and job advancement is the number one thing that would keep them with a company. Employees are eager to step up and lead, they just need the right support.

2. Align the work with the purpose.  Just as companies must provide products or services that are needed and relevant in the marketplace or their client matrix, every person within an organization wants to feel that the work they are doing is meaningful, their role is important, and they have the power to affect the company, their community, and importantly, their own career. 

3. Then, give them the capabilities to go do it.  Once you’ve identified future leaders and ensured they feel satisfied with their position and future potential, empower them with the skills and tools to do their jobs well. That means providing training opportunities, mentoring, networking, stretch assignments, and on-the-job learning that will enhance their professional development. At Deloitte University, we’ve designed state-of-the-art classrooms for cutting-edge simulations that put our professionals in real-world client scenarios. Whether it’s in-person or virtual, learning is critical to attracting top talent and keeping them satisfied.

Yes, even in a recession--even with high unemployment--companies that rely on highly skilled leaders risk losing them. Practice leadership development by design, and become an organization that leaders seek out...and stay with.

Diana O'Brien and Alice Kwan of Deloitte Consulting are coauthors of this article. O'Brien is principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP, and Managing Principal, Deloitte University; Kwan is principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP, and U.S. Talent Services Leader.


Via Laura Goodrich, Ricard Lloria
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marilyn Moats Kennedy from Diversity & Inclusion in Business
Scoop.it!

Getting the most from Gen Y: Research delves into the Millennial mindset ‹ Diversity Insight

Getting the most from Gen Y: Research delves into the Millennial mindset ‹ Diversity Insight | age demographics | Scoop.it
Diversity Insight: Strategies for building a diverse, multi-cultural workplace (#MTV research on #millennials at work: Half prefer NO JOB vs.

Via Kasia Hein-Peters
more...
Kasia Hein-Peters's curator insight, March 19, 2013 5:23 PM

Generational differences