African media futures
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African media futures
Collating various resources helpful for exploring the future of media in Africa
Curated by Rudolf Kabutz
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Do you have an unhealthy realtionship with social media?

Do you have an unhealthy realtionship with social media? | African media futures | Scoop.it

In the B2B social media marketing world, it's easy to contract the social media sickness! Do you check social alerts all day? Learn more in this infographic.


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Social TV and second-screen viewing: the stats in 2012

Social TV and second-screen viewing: the stats in 2012 | African media futures | Scoop.it

What does the latest research from Nielsen, Google, Deloitte, Thinkbox, BSkyB mean for the TV industry?


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Mobile media key for future

Mobile devices are rapidly becoming the primary medium to access the Internet across age groups, and across mature and emerging markets. In the United Kingdom (UK), 2012 saw the world’s first truly digital Olympics, with the BBC observing that its content was being consumed across personal computers, mobiles, tablets and connected televisions (TVs) at different times of the day.

 

The Olympic effect is only one factor in driving the use of smartphones, tablets, notebooks and other affordable Web-enabled mobile devices in the UK. Better network coverage, upcoming 4G spectrum auctions, high-speed broadband and Wi-Fi network rollout, and the explosive growth of mobile apps are helping fuel the demand for ubiquitous availability of Internet services.


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14 tools for visual storytelling

14 tools for visual storytelling | African media futures | Scoop.it

A list of just 14 tools that journalists might find useful to tell stories in visual ways.


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streetsmartprof's comment, January 17, 2013 8:10 AM
Some day I would love to hear some stories of your past life as a journalist and how you moved from structure to the flow of story. What I like the most of a good news article, (written by a decent journallist), is the lead. In the B2B world, "having a point" is missed far too often and replaced with fluff words, such as state of the art. In this way, even though both news and B2B content march to a different drummer, as Simon Sinek points out, start with why, the rest will follow. Yet I also firmly belief a good story needs to follow the right flow to connect with and move the listener. On re-invent, no fear, we violently agree, it is a metaphor us engineers use all the time. To re-invent implies we are using things of the past, such as a wheel...
streetsmartprof's comment, January 17, 2013 8:12 AM
Small clarification, on start with why, I do not mean the story starts this way. As Simon points out, the why is in all things one does and helps us build what it is we are trying to achieve.
Karen Dietz's comment, January 17, 2013 4:39 PM
Hi John/Ken -- I love these comments! I was able to move from structure to story flow by taking oral storytelling classes with some of the top folks in the story performance arena. I could myself very lucky to have had those experiences and encourage everyone I can to take some oral storytelling classes. And creating writing classes along the way sure helped too! As you say, lead-ins are so important and so many folks I coach/train struggle with how to open a story. I think my training as a journalist definitely helped there. I totally agree with your points about fluff and starting out with why, and flow. LOL on the re-invent! Great minds think alike :)
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Gen Z takes the digital space by storm

Gen Z takes the digital space by storm | African media futures | Scoop.it

   Generation Z,” or children born between the years of 1994 and 2004, have likely never known life without the Internet, cell phones or YouTube. That makes them the most digitally connected generation ever. Although children aren’t permitted to register for an account on social networking sites such as Twitter, Youtube and Facebook until the age of 13, that’s not stopping them from embracing the digital age.

 

Social Media


Teens ages 13-17 make up 10 percent of total Facebook users, but let’s not discount those younger than 13 who are using social networking sites. Togetherville, also known as “Facebook for kids,” allows children 10 years and younger to play games, acquire virtual gifts and watch YouTube videos with their friends. The site requires parents to sign up their kids and even allows them to monitor their children’s use in real-time. A separate social network called Scuttlepad, or “Twitter for kids,” asserts that it lets children “tell your friends what you're doing (...just like the older kids do!).”


Brands seem to be taking notice of Generation Z’s online interests. Mattel recently launched the Barbie Video Girl, a toy that makes it easy for girls to create and edit their own video and post it on YouTube. They’re also asking consumers to follow them on Foursquare and Twitter as Barbie travels the US for a chance to win a Video Girl doll. Other YouTube channels, such as Sesame Street and Fred, have racked up thousands of views and prove that even pre-schoolers are familiar with social media.

 

Gaming & Web


Children are spending about 17 minutes per day playing online games – that includes even the tiniest of tykes. To meet the growing demand, toy company Fischer-Price offers a collection of educational games for infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers, while PBS’s Sid the Science Kid game teaches children all about antibodies, weather and vocabulary.

 

Going Mobile


In 2009, the average child was given his own cell phone at 9.7 years old; that’s actually down from 10.1 years in 2008. Children are spending this time sending thousands of text messages a month, playing pre-installed games, taking pictures and listening to music. And although Leapfrog’s “baby Blackberry” isn’t actually a phone, it certainly teaches tiny tots how to type on a Qwerty keyboard at a surprisingly young age.

 

Parents are Adapting, Too


It seems that parents are becoming more and more comfortable with their children being active in the digital space and are especially comfortable with it being used as an educational tool. In fact, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, only three-in-10 children have restrictions on media use, and Retrevo.com reports that 31 percent of parents think children under nine are ready to own their first computer.

At this point, it seems there’s no turning back for Generation Z. Whether kids are addicted or just more social, it’s clear that they’re spending more and more time consuming digital media.

-- Christa Keizer, New Media Intern


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Gen Y talent: How to attract and retain the young and the restless - ABC Technology and Games

Gen Y talent: How to attract and retain the young and the restless - ABC Technology and Games | African media futures | Scoop.it
ABC Technology and GamesGen Y talent: How to attract and retain the young and the restlessABC Technology and GamesThe "digital natives" of Generation Y do not know life without technology and the Internet.

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5 Companies That Will Define The Future Of Radio

5 Companies That Will Define The Future Of Radio | African media futures | Scoop.it
Who's forging the future of radio? It's still early, but keep an ear on this handful of businesses already pounding out that future. 

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FAQ: Social media and journalism

The Online Journalism Blog answers the dozen questions you have always wanted to ask about social media and journalism.


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Swedish Radio Future Media Project

Swedish Radio Future Media Project | African media futures | Scoop.it

Mats Svegfors, Director General of Swedish Radio, and SR's Deputy Director General Cilla Benkö have published an interactive book online entitled Journalism 3.0 - Media Ecology and the Future.


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Social media for broadcasters: 5 golden rules

Social media for broadcasters: 5 golden rules | African media futures | Scoop.it

By radiomike

 

1. Less is more

On social media platforms, quality is definitely more important than quantity. One of the biggest mistakes that brands sometimes make is to throw up a lot of content onto Facebook or Twitter in a way that is neither engaging nor connecting.

 

Do not post content unless you believe that it is relevant and that your audience will care. Unless you are providing optimised content that serves a real need, it will not generate more listening or viewing.

 

2. Being there is not enough

"Everyone is on Facebook, so we should be too," is not a social media strategy. Since a compelling and successful presence on social media will require resources, it sometimes helps to think of what you hope to achieve as a ROI (Return On Investment).

 

And it has to be an on-going investment in order to bear fruit. As in the real world, relationships take time to develop and strengthen.

 

Listeners and viewers are happy and often expect to see their favourite channel, station or programme on Facebook and Twitter, but you must acknowledge that they are there.

 

Social media is about conversation, not shouting a message. Listen to what your fans are saying and never stop listening.

 

One of the cardinal sins is to ask questions and then disappear. A comment must be answered, no less than a ringing telephone.

 

It is not enough to give away lots of tickets and prizes. Unless you acknowledge your audience socially, you make them feel that you don't care.

 

Above all, people want to feel that they are part of your channel or brand and that they belong. When you ask them to like you on Facebook or to follow you on Twitter, they think that you are trying to start a conversation and that you care.

 

It is wrong to ask them to do these things unless you are prepared to respond to their comments and ideas.

 

All of this requires specialized training to help journalists and producers to understand the benefits of social media, and to know how to participate effectively.

 

3. You're not the only one with an audience

Nowadays everyone has a voice and the power to influence her or his peers. Everyone who is active on Facebook and Twitter has their own audiences.

 

They are all connected to other people who trust them and respect their opinions. They recommend programmes to each other all the time.

 

Social media allow you to interact with a group of listeners or viewers who are emotionally connected to your brand and are motivated to share the content that you provide. If you listen to your fans or followers, they can generate the higher mind share that you will need to achieve higher ratings.

 

Your audience will share content with their individual audiences, who will in turn recommend it to their friends and followers.

 

It is part of human nature that none of us want to feel as though we are excluded from a conversation. Live TV has demonstrated the power of social media when used the "second screen" to enhance the TV experience and to foster TV-based communities.

 

4. Behave as you would in the real world

Everyday rules of etiquette and good behaviour also apply in the world of social media. Furthermore, if something is not interesting in real life there is no reason to think people will care when they see it on your Facebook page.

 

What you had for breakfast will be of little interest or importance to your show's followers unless you are a celebrity presenter. In real life, we would not shout to everyone in a room that someone has paid us a compliment, so why re-tweet vapid praise?

 

It is annoying and clogs up feeds with irrelevant content. If nothing else works, stop and ask yourself, would I be interested if somebody said that to me in real life?

 

5. It's a lot of work - is it worth the effort?

Public service media invest a great deal of resources into creating compelling news programmes, light entertainment , music and fiction. Maximizing visibility is not only a matter of common sense, many see it as an essential part of their remit.

 

Social media help to raise the profile of station or programme brands and to increase rating for linear radio and TV. This happens by making it easier to discover content in several different ways .

 

Firstly, there is the process of recommendation within a peer group. Secondly, hashtags are proving another very effective way of reaching people who are not part of your community.

Thirdly, Google and other search engines rank results from Twitter very high up in search results.

 

In the end, though, it is a question of future survival. We are heading towards a very fragmented future will become increasingly comfortable with choosing which content they want to consume when and where.

 

Gone are the days when broadcasters could shout from the top of the hill to a grateful audience. The Internet is educating listeners and viewers to use their voices and to expect broadcasters to listen and to respond.


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Radio needs to understand what the automakers are thinking

The average age of a car in the U.S. is now 11 years old – and that means that in the next year or so, many Americans will be in the market for a new vehicle. And many of these consumers will purchase one that is equipped with a system like Ford’s SYNC and Toyota’s Entune. This is significant because as we learned in Techsurvey8, a majority of our 57,300 respondents say the lion’s share of the broadcast radio listening takes place behind the wheel.


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When will such cars come to Africa when the average lifespan of cars on the continent is most likely more than 20 years?

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In-car net radio becomes a reality

In-car net radio becomes a reality | African media futures | Scoop.it

Ford has announced a new developer program which will allow radio stations gain space on a vehicle’s digital screen via apps. The SYNC© AppLink™ already includes a way to listen to the radio via smartphones, with Pandora, Stitcher smart radio and iHeartRadio on board, but now Ford is opening it up to any station – regardless of whether the station is online, AM, FM, or digital.


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Fourth Wall does the 'Dirty Work' of innovation

Fourth Wall does the 'Dirty Work' of innovation | African media futures | Scoop.it
"We're building a studio of the future that has the pieces in place to pick up where Hollywood is dropping the ball," said Lee. "We're saying this is what the future of storytelling looks like. This is how you engage with audiences on not just one platform, but across multiple platforms."

 


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Future possibilities for media in communication.

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A Multi-Screen Future

A Multi-Screen Future | African media futures | Scoop.it

The number of adults in Britain watching TV on demand via TV sets and mobile devices is growing, whilst on demand viewing via a desktop or laptop computer has peaked, according to newly released research from Kantar Media.


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Multi-tasking in the age of the tablet

Multi-tasking in the age of the tablet | African media futures | Scoop.it

Media and multi-tasking is nothing new, and that's especially true of tablet owners, according to newly released research by GfK MRI's iPanel. Given the portability of the devices and all the capabilities they offer, it's no wonder tablet owners are voracious multi-taskers—in fact, fully 90 percent of them do something else while using their tablets, and multi-tasking accounts for 40 percent of their tablet time. A particularly big percentage of that multi-tasking time is spent watching TV, with 63 percent of tablet owners using their tablets for that purpose, and 41 percent of their total TV-watching time spent using their tablets at the same time.


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Multitasking impacts TV's dominance

Multitasking impacts TV's dominance | African media futures | Scoop.it

TV gathers more total consumers than all other media, but audience fragmentation and multitasking make these results less clear. A new report claims that consumers’ attention is more divided than ever as media multitasking becomes the norm.


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The human algorithm

The human algorithm | African media futures | Scoop.it

The onslaught of real-time social, local, mobile (SoLoMo) technology is nothing short of overwhelming. Besides the gadgets, apps, social networks and appliances that continue to emerge, the pace of innovation is only outdone by the volumes of data that each produce. Everything we share, everywhere we go, everything we say and everyone we follow or connect with, generates valuable information that can be used to improve consumer experiences and ultimately improve products and services.


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[Study] How digital natives use the Internet

[Study] How digital natives use the Internet | African media futures | Scoop.it
Ofcom’s Media Literacy report, released in Oct 2012, reveals an interesting picture of children’s use of the Internet. According to the report, many parents readily admit that their children know m...

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The Rebirth Of Radio | TechCrunch

The Rebirth Of Radio | TechCrunch | African media futures | Scoop.it
Since Pandora’s IPO a year ago, the online audio story has been something of a broken record.

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Young Listeners Turn Off Broadcast, Tune Into Internet Radio [STUDY]

Young Listeners Turn Off Broadcast, Tune Into Internet Radio [STUDY] | African media futures | Scoop.it
A recent study has found that Internet radio listenership is on the rise -- and while digital device usage may have something to do with this increase, it's harder to tell social media's role.

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10 questions for Cilla Benkö

10 questions for Cilla Benkö | African media futures | Scoop.it

Cilla Benkö is Director General of Swedish Radio and a member of the EBU's Executive Board. She took up her appointment as Director General in October 2012, after sharing the responsibility of running one of the EBU's most dynamic and innovative member organisations with her predecessor, Mats Svegfors, since 2009.

Cilla is an experienced journalist, radio producer and manager. In a career spanning more than 20 years, she has held a number of senior positions, including stints as head of news at Swedish Radio and at Swedish Television.

Cilla Benkö is the joint author of the interactive web book project, Journalism 3.0 - Media Ecology and the Future, along with SR's former DG, Mats Svegfors.

The web book discusses key issues relating to the way media and journalism are evolving. It is descriptive rather than prescriptive, with the stated aim of stimulating a debate by exchanging knowledge and insight.


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Radio's multi-platform future

Radio appears to be at pretty good health: 90% of the audiences in the UK listen to the radio at least once a week. "Radio is massive", James Cridland (Media UK, managing director radio futurologist) says. People still discover music mainly through radio, either on AM/FM or on the web. Why could "Wired" be so wrong?


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Radioplayer makes Hybrid Radio

Radioplayer makes Hybrid Radio | African media futures | Scoop.it

A new type of radio was unveiled at The Radio Festival by Radioplayer – a single radio unit which brings together all radio platforms.


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A beta strategy for radio

The internet is changing society and human behaviour in fundamental ways. Even the English language is not immune from the effects of online culture.

In media, the internet has transformed not only the way that we distribute content, but also the way that audiences engage and interact with content.

The culture of agile software development is now influencing the way that broadcasters create new programmes. For the first time, programme makers are experimenting with their very own beta development strategy, which means launching new products that are feature complete, but are not yet fully debugged or "road tested".


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BMW Wants To Make Your Next Car A Truly Mobile 4G LTE Hotspot | TechCrunch

BMW Wants To Make Your Next Car A Truly Mobile 4G LTE Hotspot | TechCrunch | African media futures | Scoop.it
BMW has rolled out a new feature that will let riders stay connected, by adding 4G LTE WiFi connectivity to its cars.

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Great new opportunities for media and communication on the road.

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