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How To Teach Critical Thinking Using Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic

How To Teach Critical Thinking Using Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic | African futures insight | Scoop.it
You can now easily integrate Bloom's Taxonomy into the teaching of critical thinking skills in your classroom using a fabulously simple chart!

Via David Mainwood / EFL SMARTblog, Dennis T OConnor, Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

Thanks, dear Fabienne, this is really insightful.

In teaching one might want to progressively move from one level to the next, yet I would expect that one could work on all levels simultaneously.

How much more would children learn when they ask their 3-year-old, "What do you think ..."

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Vannessa MissoVeness's curator insight, October 1, 2013 4:10 PM

Always good to be reminded of how to do something despite my teaching experience.

Dovid's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:12 PM

Bloom's Taxonomy simplified for developing thinking skills!

Cassandra's curator insight, October 11, 2013 8:57 AM

Good information for teaching or treatment plans.

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The ONE Question To Ask When You Don't Know What To Do as a Leader | careynieuwhof.com

The ONE Question To Ask When You Don't Know What To Do as a Leader | careynieuwhof.com | African futures insight | Scoop.it
What do you do when you don't know what to do as a leader? Asking this ONE simple question can clarify so much and get you unstuck.
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

Projecting yourself and your situation into the future and back-casting is really powerful to explore the issues of today. This way the long-term implications of our present actions come into the right perspective, and the long-term visions and desires pull us to take appropriate action today.

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Timeline of the Future

Many tech companies have already planned out their roadmaps for the next several decades. What do we have to look forward to? What's complete science fiction?
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

This graphic timeline helps to sketch out some of the technological developments to think about and to look out for.

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What does the future look like and how can technology help us get there?

What does the future look like and how can technology help us get there? | African futures insight | Scoop.it
Freemavens were able to get a glimpse of what this might entail from speakers across medicine, academia, change management, design, energy and business at the London Futurists conference Anticipati...
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

Continuous affordable energy supply is critical for the development of the economy and society in Africa. Here are some glimpses from the London Futurists conference 2014.

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10 'Star Trek' Technologies That Actually Exist

10 'Star Trek' Technologies That Actually Exist | African futures insight | Scoop.it
These technologies got their start in the scripts, but they're now as real as the Higgs boson and its attendant field.
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How To Teach Critical Thinking Using Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic

How To Teach Critical Thinking Using Bloom's Taxonomy - Edudemic | African futures insight | Scoop.it
You can now easily integrate Bloom's Taxonomy into the teaching of critical thinking skills in your classroom using a fabulously simple chart!

Via David Mainwood / EFL SMARTblog, Dennis T OConnor, Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

Thanks, dear Fabienne, this is really insightful.

In teaching one might want to progressively move from one level to the next, yet I would expect that one could work on all levels simultaneously.

How much more would children learn when they ask their 3-year-old, "What do you think ..."

more...
Vannessa MissoVeness's curator insight, October 1, 2013 4:10 PM

Always good to be reminded of how to do something despite my teaching experience.

Dovid's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:12 PM

Bloom's Taxonomy simplified for developing thinking skills!

Cassandra's curator insight, October 11, 2013 8:57 AM

Good information for teaching or treatment plans.

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International Futures Forum

International Futures Forum

Via Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

FF is developing a body of ideas and philosophy about how to make sense of today’s complex world. We share that thinking widely as a contribution to the global intellectual commons. We hold events to exchange ideas and experience, and members of IFF’s international clanstay in touch online and meet together as often as possible.

 

We embody our evolving insights in designed processes, tools, products, practices and ways of working that allow for their application in the context of specific challenges: IFF method.

 

We take on real challenges with partners in business, government and communities – the kinds of challenges that tend otherwise to reside in the ‘too difficult’ tray. Some of this work is written up in our programme pages.

 

The experience of tackling real issues feeds back into our thinking and our developing practice in a robust and dynamic cycle of social learning.

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8 Visionaries on How They Spot the Future | Wired Business | Wired.com

8 Visionaries on How They Spot the Future | Wired Business | Wired.com | African futures insight | Scoop.it
Wired editors pick the brains of Paul Saffo, Esther Dyson, and Joi Ito (and five others) for insight into how to see the future.

Via Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT
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Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT's curator insight, March 17, 2013 3:05 AM

Please, read the 1st comment to this paper from Inigo • There are three very simple principles to apply in knowing the future. Isn't there some truth in this pessimistic vision? If so, how to turn it into a positive vision?

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Help Neal Stephenson Engineer Create a New World of Sci-Fi

Help Neal Stephenson Engineer Create a New World of Sci-Fi | African futures insight | Scoop.it

 

Last week Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination, where I serve as director, officially launched the Hieroglyph Project, an effort to get science fiction writers talking with scientists and engineers about the future.  (Disclosure: Future Tense is a partnership of ASU,Slate, and the New America Foundation). The goal is to break out of our dystopian rut and get some ambitious new ideas on the table, and we need your help to do it.

Sci-fi great Neal Stephenson founded Hieroglyph with the idea that we need more optimistic visions of the future—visions that are still grounded in real science and technology. As Stephenson haspointed out, a good science fiction story can save us from hundreds of hours of meetings and PowerPoint presentations by immediately getting everyone on the same page about a potential breakthrough.

 

This sounds great in theory, but the entertainment landscape is crowded with evidence of what can go wrong when you try to substitute idealism for good storytelling. On the one hand, it would be a terrible mistake to try and impose optimism on every idea. That way lies the Kitchen of the Future, Brook Farm, and some of the creepier episodes of the Twilight Zone. At best, true utopias make for boring and implausible stories.

 

On the other undulating, Cthulhu-esque appendage, your standard-issue dystopia isn’t going to help much either. Survival narratives in the post-apocalyptic ashes like The Road generally reinforce the notion that the details of scientific progress are unimportant since the endgame is inevitable and wretched. The more nuanced genre of Orwellian nightmare scenarios (Children of Men, for example) is a little better, since it reminds us of everything we have to lose, but the moral of these stories usually suggests that no uplifting technology can match the destructive power of human folly.

How can we use Hieroglyph to create convincing stories about a better future, tales with conflict and resolution, with believable characters, with a compelling mixture of hope and irony? Well, while we have set of guidelines for our collaborators, there’s no expectation that every story will have a happy ending. A story where people make mistakes and things don’t work out exactly as planned—that’s pretty much every human story worth hearing. Some of the optimism in Hieroglyph might rely on the simple claim that we can build a better world if we set our minds to it, even if our hero dies or the mistakes along the way are painful ones.

 

Second, we aim to draw a few lessons from the golden age of science fiction without succumbing entirely to that worldview, which at its worst imagines every future problem can be solved by chisel-jawed white guys with engineering degrees wielding the weapons of Science. At their best, stories like “Requiem” by Robert Heinlein, and Isaac Asimov’s “It’s Such a Beautiful Day” were technologically optimistic without sacrificing a credible sense of humanity. The spirit of adventure, of boundless promise, was tempered with human conflicts that illustrated the importance of understanding our tools both technically and culturally.

 

A big part of what gives these stories their frisson, the fresh chill of a new future, is the gap between our world and the fictional universe in question. There’s a kind of intellectual vertigo at play: The author has made some kind of grand imaginative leap and asks us to follow along. What distinguishes Hieroglyph is that we seek to radically extend our idea of what is possible in the present, not a distant future, by drawing on real, cutting-edge research.

And we’re doing it online. Of course we’d really like to invite every writer and researcher involved to spend a few weeks at some serene resort with a well-stocked bar, but then we wouldn’t be able to invite the whole world to participate in these conversations. So instead we built hieroglyph.asu.edu, a site for social collaboration based on WordPress and Commons in a Box, a suite of tools designed for just this kind of work.

 

Hieroglyph is an experiment in mapping out the current field of human potential—stuff we could do if we just set our minds to it, but that is so alien to conventional wisdom that it creates that familiar science fiction vertigo.

Through the interactions these incredible thinkers will have on the Hieroglyph site, I hope we will also put a much larger group of people in conversation with different ideas about the future. And that’s where you come in: this experiment is only going to work if we use these ideas to start a bigger conversation. Come on over and help us build this thing.


Via James Keith, Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT
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Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT's curator insight, April 23, 2013 11:42 PM

please,if your ideas are really innovative, contribute!!! We are suffering such a failure of imagination, here, in old EU....

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Why Estonia Has Started Teaching Its First-Graders To Code

Why Estonia Has Started Teaching Its First-Graders To Code | African futures insight | Scoop.it
It's already ahead in getting public services online, now tiny Estonia is launching a nationwide scheme to teach school kids to write programs.

 

Estonia, a small country with a population of 1.3 million people, punches above its own weight when it comes to advancements in tech. It was the birthplace of Skype, one of the first countries to have a government that was fully e-enabled, and now it has launched a nationwide scheme to teach school kids from the age of seven to 19, how to write code. The idea isn’t to start churning out app developers of the future, but people who have smarter relationships with technology, computers and the Web .

 

So why start so early? “We want to change thinking that computers and programs are just things as they are. There is an opportunity to create something, and be a smart user of technology.” says Ave Lauringson, the coordinator of the project.

 

By Parmy Olson

 

Full article: http://www.forbes.com/sites/parmyolson/2012/09/06/why-estonia-has-started-teaching-its-first-graders-to-code/


Via Katia Frolova
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Laura Goodrich's curator insight, June 14, 2013 7:30 AM

Estonia, a small country with a population of 1.3 million people, punches above its own weight when it comes to advancements in tech.

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A new vision for the future role of the military - Washington Post

A new vision for the future role of the military
Washington Post
Are Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen.
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

The US is realizing that future national threats may cannot necessarily be confronted by conventional weapons. How can we address future threats in Africa - cyber attacks on people that are new to digital media, fresh collonization by different nations, exploitation of dwindling natural resources by powerful global companies???

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MediaFuturist: A conversation with fellow Futurist Anton Musgrave (audio)

MediaFuturist: A conversation with fellow Futurist Anton Musgrave (audio) | African futures insight | Scoop.it
Anton Musgrave is a fellow futurist from South Africa and co-founder of Future World, and a great chap to talk to. This conversation is about what futurists do and what we don't do:) Check it out.
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

This interesting conversation between two futurists give a practical perspective for future thinking.

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accessible "foresight" publications – Open Access Theses and Dissertations (OATD)

accessible "foresight" publications – Open Access Theses and Dissertations (OATD) | African futures insight | Scoop.it

Open Access Theses & Dissertations with keyword search on 'foresight'.

(Thanks to Jay Gary for the link)

http://bit.ly/14s1iov

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The Future Is Not Accelerating

The Future Is Not Accelerating | African futures insight | Scoop.it
I have some bad news and some good news for you about the future. First, the bad news. The future is not coming at us any faster than it ever has. We will not become immortal cyborgs with superintelligent computer friends in the next twenty years.

Via Vasily Gatov
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Take Hold of the Future, Six Faces of Global Change - Patrick Dixon, at USI - YouTube

 

How to be Futurewise: Stay ahead of the competition with agile leadership, rapid innovation, and smart insight to deliver true customer magic. This fast-moving keynote covers a wide range of vital trends that will transform our world—and reveals a single word that will drive the future for the next 30-40 years.

Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

Significant global trends affect our organisations and our personal lives. By exploring the impact of global trends on our strategies, we can become more agile for being relevant with our products and services in the future.

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EmPowering Africa | Worldwatch Institute

EmPowering Africa | Worldwatch Institute | African futures insight | Scoop.it
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

In sub-Saharan Africa, seven out of ten people lack reliable access to electricity. A sustainable energy economy can change the future by boosting the quality of education, helping erradicate illness and disease, and facilitating economic growth across the region.

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SA’s economy ‘set to muddle on like Bafana Bafana’

SA’s economy ‘set to muddle on like Bafana Bafana’ | African futures insight | Scoop.it
Most likely scenario for SA’s economic and political trajectory until 2030 is to ‘muddle along’ as a ‘chronic underachiever’, says paper on future scenarios
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

Three alternative scenarios of the future can help South Africans move ahead pro-actively.

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The FOURS V's of Big Data - How can this data be used to explore the future?

The FOURS V's of Big Data - How can this data be used to explore the future? | African futures insight | Scoop.it
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

As global societies are becoming increasingly connected, Big Data can be come a valuable tool not just for exploring the present, but also for anticipating the future.

Tackling the Big Data can be done through Deep analysing, Deep thinking, Deep questioning, and Deep connecting.

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Photos from the future show that the world in 2050 may not be so bad after all

Photos from the future show that the world in 2050 may not be so bad after all | African futures insight | Scoop.it
Science fiction books usually portray dark dystopias. But these renderings show an alternative future: an optimistic story that depicts a world where...
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Kurzweil discusses future of tech

Kurzweil, inventor of the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, founder of Singularity University and the “rightful heir to Thomas Edison,” according to Forbes, compared medical advances to other technological advances, arguing that...

Via Spaceweaver, Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT
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What if? Visions of the future - imagining the future without words. BBC News

What if? Visions of the future -  imagining the future without words. BBC News | African futures insight | Scoop.it
A global season of features about the future

We asked you to send us your visions of the future; hundreds of you did and now two winners have been chosen

We set the global BBC audience the challenge of imagining the future without words. We received more than 800 stills and videos from all corners of the world.

Eventually a panel of international judges representing five continents chose their favourites and from those just two winners were selected.

The competition is part of the What If? season looking into the future.


Via Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT
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Who Controls the Education Industry? FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey

Who Controls the Education Industry? FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey | African futures insight | Scoop.it
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

My recommendation to the youth for preparing to become educated for the workplace of the future:
1. select the general direction into which you want to be moving,
2. define the types of skills you anticipate you could use,
3. search for personal study material that will help you acquire such skills,
4. define work opportunities where you can experiment with and try out these skills,
5. find online study courses that will help to explore these skills with others,
6. build a network of like-minded students, teachers and professionals, and then also
7. explore which tertiary education could help provide some of these skills,

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How The Human Face Might Look In 100,000 Years

How The Human Face Might Look In 100,000 Years | African futures insight | Scoop.it

100,000 years from now, Kwan believes the human face will reflect "total mastery over human morphological genetics. This human face will be heavily biased towards features that humans find fundamentally appealing: strong, regal lines, straight nose, intense eyes, and placement of facial features that adhere to the golden ratio and left/right perfect symmetry," he says.

 

Eyes will seem "unnervingly large" -- as least from our viewpoint today -- and will feature eye-shine and even a sideways blink from the re-introduced plica semilunaris to further protect from cosmic ray effects.

 

There will be other functional necessities: larger nostrils for easier breathing in off-planet environments, denser hair to contain heat loss from a larger head -- features which people may have to weigh up against their tastes for what's genetically trendy at the time. Instead of just debating what to name a child as new parents do today, they might also have to decide if they want their children to carry the most natural expression of a couple's DNA, such as their eye-color, teeth and other features they can genetically alter.

Excessive Borg-like technological implants would start to become untrendy, though, as people start to increasingly value that which makes us look naturally human. That "will be ever more important to us in an age where we have the ability to determine any feature," Kwan says.


Via Gary Schmidt
Rudolf Kabutz's insight:

Would humans really change so much over time, or would they actually look pretty much like they look today???

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Tracking the Future just got better

Tracking the Future just got better | African futures insight | Scoop.it

Dear Friend!

 

Tracking the Future is a news syndication hub where we explore the rapid advancement of technology and its long term impact on society

I'd like to invite you to explore the magazine with the upgraded category filters.

Thank you for following and spreading the message!

 

You can follow Tracking the future on other platforms too:

 

the video board on Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/trackingthe/future/


the tumblr page: http://trackingthefuture.tumblr.com/


the wordpress page: http://trackingthefuture.wordpress.com/


on google plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/104526639588787227921/posts

 

on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/trackingthefuture

 

or you can follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/szabolcs_kosa

 

 


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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hedgeshandy's comment, October 17, 2013 3:30 AM
Thats superb...
Karen Bale's curator insight, May 11, 7:53 PM

Follow the links to further information on the future impact of rapidly developing technology on society.

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27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2012

27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2012 | African futures insight | Scoop.it
We may never have our flying cars, but the future is here. From creating fully functioning artificial leaves to hacking the human brain, science made a lot of breakthroughs this year.

Via Clare Treloar
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Clare Treloar's curator insight, December 21, 2012 10:28 PM

For the speculative fiction unit

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The Human Race to the Future: What Could Happen - and What to Do: Daniel Berleant: Amazon.com: Kindle Store

The Human Race to the Future: What Could Happen - and What to Do: Daniel Berleant: Amazon.com: Kindle Store
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Rudolf Kabutz's comment, May 12, 2013 10:08 AM
Get the Kindle version of "The Human Race to the Future: What Could Happen -- and What to Do" free before Monday 12 May 8:00 am. UTC
Laura Goodrich's comment, May 15, 2013 8:23 AM
I got it! Thanks for the suggestion Rudolf!
Rudolf Kabutz's comment, May 15, 2013 11:47 AM
Great, @Laura Goodrich, I hope you still got the free versionin time - it looks like a very interesting read!