African Americans in the Military in WWII
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African Americans in the Military

World War II

A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

A’Nanee Coffie

February 3, 2014

Hour: 6

American History

 

            My topic was African Americans in the Military. Overall African Americans had a hard time overcoming their struggles and this time was no different, but somehow they always managed to find a way to do so. When World War II broke out it turned the United States upside down. We were already in the middle of a depression and were going to add onto that by joining a war. To pull this off we would need the help of everyone. A draft was issued and all men were expected to fight. Although the African Americans were not apart of the draft but they still would volunteer still. Eventually President Franklin D Roosevelt would allow them to enlist in the military and help war efforts officially but it was still segregated. However that did not stop the African American Soldiers it only added fuel to their fire because they were not just fighting one war but two, otherwise know as the Double Victory. the Double V was African Americans fighting overseas and at home for equality for all. World War II would help the Win their Double Victory and open doors to many more opportunities for advancement and achievements.

            At the beginning of the war African Americans were given noncombat roles such as cooks and people who delivered ammunition and carried injured back to base. As time progressed and they showed their loyalty and determination they were given challenging roles and higher ranked positions. All of this lead to the breaking down of barriers because Whites noticed that Blacks were capable of doing the same things as them and began to serve side by side. Although it took several years of hard work African Americans in the Military made a difference and continue to make a difference to this day. They are even being recognized for their accomplishments and are making their way up to bigger and better heights. Not only African American men made a significant difference, but African American Women as well.

 

           

 

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:23 PM
Would have loved for you to use specific examples of units or people that were important in the effort to win WW2 and what they accomplished. Always use evidence to support your writing.
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The History Place - African-Americans in WW II

The History Place - African-Americans in WW II | African Americans in the Military in WWII | Scoop.it
A selection of photos highlighting their achievments.
A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

highlights the many achievements of african american soldiers during this time

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:21 PM
Not enough insight.
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Primary Source Vocabulary

vocabulary words and definitions

A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

1. Noncommissioned Officer: an officer (such as a sergeant or corporal) who has a low rank in the army, air force, or marine corps.

-Once African American soldiers were given more important roles they were moved up to become noncommissioned officers 

2.Battalion is a military unit with 300 to 1,200 soldiers that usually consists of two to seven companies  and is commanded by either a lieutenant colonel or a colonel, if in the United States Army or the United States Marine Corp.

-The 52nd Battalion includes several African Americans.

3. Subsequent: coming after something in time.

-The United States subsequently let African Americans join the military after the attack on pearl harbor.

4.Segragation: separating something apart.

-the military was segregated until 1941.

5.intervened: come between to prevent something

-he acted outside of his authority when he intervened in the assualt

6.Barracks: building or group of buildings used to house soldiers

-when the day is over solders were sent back to there barracks

7.Condemed: particular punishment

-the man was condemned to death for committing the terrible crime

8.jubilation: a feeling of great happiness or triumph

-when the shot down a Japanese fighter plane everyone was jubilant.

9. inland: situated in the country and not on the coast.

-The army fights inland while the navy fights in the ocean.

10.concealment: hiding something

While they were fighting the jungle concealed them.

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:18 PM
Excellent.
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Primary Source 2: The right to fight: African-American Marines in World War II :: World War II - Documents

Primary Source 2: The right to fight: African-American Marines in World War II :: World War II - Documents | African Americans in the Military in WWII | Scoop.it
A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

This is a pamphlet that shows how segregated the military was during this time, how African American soldiers were mistreated and did not receive the same treatment as white soldiers. How Although an enormous amount of african americans volunteered to help the war effort the were accepted in to the military in small numbers and only given jobs as cooks. However in September of 1940 president Franklin D Roosevelt offer and opportunity to advance in the military as an african american. This would begin to slowly change the look of the segregated military into a intgrated military.

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:15 PM
Minor spelling and grammar errors.
Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:17 PM
Next time you'll want to post an image of the pamphlet, which I can show you how to do.
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Connection to Today 2: Blacks still rare in top U.S. military ranks - USATODAY.com

Connection to Today 2: Blacks still rare in top U.S. military ranks - USATODAY.com | African Americans in the Military in WWII | Scoop.it
Blacks have made great strides in the military since it was integrated 60 years ago, but they still struggle to gain a foothold in the higher ranks, where less than 6% of U.S. general officers are African-American.
A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

African Americans have made a tremendous amount of progress in the military and the civilian world. They succeeded in winning their Double Victory, which was for freedom and equality on the homefront and in the military. During World War 2 African Americans were not given any leadership positions. However now, over 60 years later they are now finding more and more African Americans in significantly high ranked positions. Although it is still only less than 10% African Americans in higher ranked positions they still continue to make major contributions and change in the military.

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:14 PM
Good connection.
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Double V

Click here to edit the title

A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

Elaborates on how World War two was a open door to equality for African Americans.

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:21 PM
Not enough insight.
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african-americans-in-world.pdf

A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

During world war II african americans were fighting more than one war. They were fighting overseas to help war efforts but also at home to gain equal rights. this was know as the Double V. it also showed how they were slowly but surely gaining more and more responsibility and opportunities. 

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:20 PM
Grammar and spelling errors.
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Primary Source 3: USSMason.org USS Mason Proudly We Served

Primary Source 3: USSMason.org USS Mason Proudly We Served | African Americans in the Military in WWII | Scoop.it
A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

This is an article that shows that african americans were ready and willing to serve and help war efforts. It also tells that in the cilil war 30% african americans made up Navy but in 1941the navy was whites only. However their effort in the attack on Pearl Harbor lead to the Navy being open to everyone on June1,1942.

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:19 PM
Only his quote is a primary source, needed to chose a more complete one to have a full SOAPs analysis.
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Primary Source 1: Above and beyond the call of duty--Dorie Miller received the Navy Cross at Pearl Harbor, May 27, 1942 / David Stone Martin.

Primary Source 1: Above and beyond the call of duty--Dorie Miller received the Navy Cross at Pearl Harbor, May 27, 1942 / David Stone Martin. | African Americans in the Military in WWII | Scoop.it
A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

This is a poster of a man named Doris "Doris" Miller who was awarded the Navy Cross for his duty during the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1942. Although he was only a mess hall attendant he bravely stepped up to the plate and rescued several of his fellow ship mates and also contributed to taking down the enemy. ultimately for his brave acts he was awarded the Navy Cross "This marks the first time in this conflict that such high tribute has been made in the Pacific Fleet to a member of his race and I'm sure that the future will see others similarly honored for brave acts" 

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connection to today 1: Defense.gov News Article: First Lady Invites Navy Officer to State of Union Address

A'Nanee Coffie's insight:

Michelle Obama invited the first African American Woman to become a Four Star Navy Officer. Michelle J Howard is currently the Deputy Cheif of operations. She was nominated by the President of the United States for her fourth star. Some of the awards she has recieved include: secretary of the Navy/Navy League Captain Winifred Collins award in May 1987 (for outstanding leadership) and some of her major accoplishments are Becoming the first African American woman to command a Navy Ship in 1999. In 2010 she was the maritime task force commander for the Baltic Operations exercise under U.S. 6th Fleet. She is one of many who have showed how far along, not only African American, but African American Women to.

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Erica Benson's comment, February 9, 2014 4:15 PM
Another excellent connection.